Figure 1. Dogs produced isolated facial expressions that did not resemble human emotions.

Facial Expressions Of Humans And Dogs Are Not The Same

By Maryna Mullerman ’20 Mammalian facial expressions are known to correlate with animals’ internal states. Substantial similarities have been previously identified between chimpanzees and humans, but facial expression similarities between more distant mammalian species is unknown. Caeiro Cátia and researchers from the University of Lincoln in the United Kingdom investigated whether domestic dogs produced certain…

Figure 1. White participants took more time to mentally connect a black hand with a white body schema.

The Effects Of Implicit Racial Bias On Hand Ownership Experience

By Maryna Mullerman ’20 Rubber hand visual-tactile illusion (RHI) experiments involve multisensory exposure, allowing participants to experience ownership over realistic rubber hands. Precise stimulation technique and positioning induce people to believe that a rubber hand is an integral part of their body. Marilia Lira and researchers from the Mackenzie Presbyterian University in Brazil investigated skin…

Figure 1. Older students were more successful at university curriculum than their younger peers.

Age Is No Barrier For Academic Success

By Maryna Mullerman ’20 Many studies have explored academic success predictors in young adults. In recent years, however, more people over the age of 60 have undertaken university educations. Abbie-Rose Imlach and researchers from the University of Tasmania in Australia hoped to identify cognitive, psychological, social, and genetic factors that influenced academic performance in older…

Figure 1. Caffeine affects heart rate variability in the first five minutes of recovery after physical exercise.

Running on Caffeine

By Maryna Mullerman ’20 Caffeine is a stimulant often found in coffee, energy drinks, and medicine. Many researchers have analyzed its physiological effects, but caffeine’s impact on post-exercise recovery is not widely understood.  Doctor Luana Almeida Gonzaga and researchers from São Paulo State University in Brazil conducted a study focusing on cardiovascular parameters, such as…

Figure 1. Sex-linked distinctions in light perception affect sleep and cognition in humans.

Sex Differences Affect Light Perception And Sleep

By Maryna Mullerman ’20 Artificial light and technology have been known to affect human sleep patterns. Scientists think that the circadian clock — physiological 24-hour cycle — might shift in the future. Sarah L. Chellappa and researchers from Harvard Medical School aimed to understand how chronic exposure to light at night affects human health and…