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Neural Timescales as a Possible Autism Diagnostic Tool

Annamaria Cavaleri ‘22 Takamitsu Watanabe and his research team in the RIKEN Center for Brain Science in Tokyo, Japan, found that neural ‘time windows’, the limited time during which development can be accomplished, in certain areas of the brain play a role in the cognitive symptoms of autism. A brain imaging study involving adults was used to observe the severity of autistic symptoms and how … Continue reading Neural Timescales as a Possible Autism Diagnostic Tool

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Positive Attitudes During Pregnancy Impact Child Development

Annamaria Cavaleri ‘22 A recent longitudinal study, conducted at the University of Bristol, suggests that having a positive attitude during pregnancy has a strong impact on child development later in life. Researchers used data from Bristol’s “Children of the 90s” study, which involved a questionnaire given to over 1600 pregnant women. The researchers also administered specially designed tests to study the mathematical and scientific problem-solving … Continue reading Positive Attitudes During Pregnancy Impact Child Development

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How audio training can impact the spatial cognition of visually impaired children

By Kavindra Sahabir ‘21 One of the biggest challenges for helping anyone with a sensory impairment is training the brain in making up for the missing sense. In the case of people born with a sensory impairment, it is easier to undergo such training successfully at earlier ages due to the plasticity of the brain, which allows for changes to take effect quicker. A study … Continue reading How audio training can impact the spatial cognition of visually impaired children

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The effect of diabetes on fingernail quality

By Kavindra Sahabir ‘21 In our current public understanding, Type 2 diabetes (T2D) is associated with the need for sugar-free foods and blood sugar monitors. Beyond a high blood sugar level however, it also causes chronic degradation and damage to nerves, joints, and other bodily tissues. A study done by Dr. Silhota and team endeavored to determine whether the fingernail could be a useful site … Continue reading The effect of diabetes on fingernail quality

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Edible Hydrogel Pill as Alternative to Implantation

By Mariam Malik ‘22 Hydrogels are known for absorbing significant amounts of water and having a high biocompatibility, while also possessing a high level of mechanical conformity and the ability to self-heal. Devices that physiologically monitor the body are usually made from materials with a high biocompatibility, including certain metals, silicon, and ceramics. But installing these devices require intrusive procedures. However, researchers at the Massachusetts … Continue reading Edible Hydrogel Pill as Alternative to Implantation

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Social Interactions Possibly Linked to Cerebellum

By Mariam Malik ‘22 The cerebellum, a five-centimeter wide part of the hindbrain, was initially thought of as having one major function: coordinating motor functions and balance. But new research on mice from the Albert Einstein College of Medicine in New York City shows that the remarkable cerebellar cortex may play a part in our social interactions as well. Kamran Khodakhah and colleagues were aware … Continue reading Social Interactions Possibly Linked to Cerebellum

Cancer Cells Hijack Immune Cells

By Allan Mai ‘20 A sure sign of the progression of cancer occurs when tumor cells from the initial site of development breaks off and enters the bloodstream, invading other healthy tissue. A recently published study conducted by Barbara Szczerba and her team from the Cancer Metastasis Lab at the University of Basel found that circulating tumor cells (CTCs) are associated with white blood cells, … Continue reading Cancer Cells Hijack Immune Cells

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Global Disease Outbreaks Linked to El Niño

By Allan Mai ‘20 El Niño is a complex series of weather patterns that occurs off the coast of South America. While the last El Niño occurred three years ago, the unusually warm weather and nutrient-poor water caused a series of events that continues to affect plant and animal and life, especially those that are responsible for transmitting a disease from one organism to another. … Continue reading Global Disease Outbreaks Linked to El Niño

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The Unlikely Relation Between Gut and Brain

By Allan Mai ‘20 With the high selectivity of the blood-brain barrier, it appears unlikely that microorganisms in the stomach could ever be able to reach the brain. However, past studies that have suggested major correlation between depression and specific gut bacteria and even correlation between social behavior and the activities of certain gut bacteria have sparked intense research regarding the “gut-brain” axis. Among these … Continue reading The Unlikely Relation Between Gut and Brain

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Protecting You from Yourself: The Function of Interleukin-22 Against Genotoxic Stress

By Riya Gandhi ‘22 Genotoxic stress is defined as an agent that disrupts or impairs genetic information within a cell and leads to mutations. If not repaired, these mutations often develop into cancer. Within epithelial stem cells, for example, there is a pathway called the DNA damage response (DDR) that halts the cell cycle and induces DNA repair or destruction of impaired cells through apoptosis. … Continue reading Protecting You from Yourself: The Function of Interleukin-22 Against Genotoxic Stress