Targeted Treatment to the Thalamus Can Have Successful Results in Patients with Traumatic Brain Injuries

Melanie Karniewich ’25 Brain injuries are becoming more common, but there are still a lot of unanswered questions that are asked in the aftermath of a traumatic brain injury (TBI). One issue researchers are trying to resolve is whether a patient will awaken after a TBI, and if so, how long awakening takes. Assistant professors Sima Mofakham (Department of Surgery and the Department of Electrical … Continue reading Targeted Treatment to the Thalamus Can Have Successful Results in Patients with Traumatic Brain Injuries

Neuronal Firing in Thalamus is Key to Restoring Post-TBI Consciousness

Vignesh Subramanian ’24 Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a form of acquired brain disability caused by an external force exerted against the head. The causative trauma is typically severe enough to result in loss of consciousness and the conditions under which consciousness returns remain unclear. Clinical practice uses complex electroencephalography (EEG) activity to predict its return and level, predicated on the assumption that neuronal firing … Continue reading Neuronal Firing in Thalamus is Key to Restoring Post-TBI Consciousness

Selective Striatal Neuron Degeneration in HD Linked to Autophagy Impairment

Vignesh Subramanian ’24 Huntington’s disease (HD) is an inherited neurodegenerative disease that causes the progressive breakdown of neurons over time, resulting in the development of involuntary movements (chorea), psychiatric disorders, and cognitive decline. HD is caused by the dominant mutation of the HTT gene encoding huntingtin, a protein whose normal function is unknown but is linked to projection neuron death in the striatum of the … Continue reading Selective Striatal Neuron Degeneration in HD Linked to Autophagy Impairment

Optimizing Retention in Mental Health Interventions

Lydia Wang ’26 With rising rates of mental health disorders in adolescents, it has become increasingly important to ensure that the right treatment is available for them. Many adolescents do not receive proper mental health care because of structural or psychological barriers. For example, insurmountable costs and transportation fees, as well as the stigma associated with mental health may pose potential barriers. With the advent … Continue reading Optimizing Retention in Mental Health Interventions

Uncovering the Nuances of Mental Disorders and their Impact on the Brain

Lydia Wang ’26 When referencing common medical conditions, heart disease and high blood pressure are often grouped together, as one usually implies the other. Such groupings—the simultaneous presence of two or more medical conditions—are known as comorbidities. Comorbidities in mental health are common; more than half of individuals with mental disorders have more than one. Their occurrence has been dismissed as coincidence and ignored in … Continue reading Uncovering the Nuances of Mental Disorders and their Impact on the Brain

AI-Assisted Readings May Greatly Improve Fracture Diagnosis

Sooraj Shah ’24 The detection of fractures via radiography is one of the most highly used practices in clinical settings such as the emergency room, urgent care, orthopedic and rheumatology offices. The missed fracture diagnosis rate is between 1-3%, accounting for almost 1,200 of every 100,000 patients. A major cause of missed fractures is erroneous initial readings by residents or non-radiologists, which are only corrected … Continue reading AI-Assisted Readings May Greatly Improve Fracture Diagnosis

The Role of Robots in Mental Health Detection For Children

Figure 1: Young female holding the hand of a humanoid robot. Julia Chivu ’24 Children may be more open to robots than humans when it comes to their mental health. The growing rate of anxiety and depression among children in the United Kingdom motivated researchers to utilize this unique technology as they sought out better mental health resources in the wake of the COVID-19 pandemic. … Continue reading The Role of Robots in Mental Health Detection For Children

Use of Retinoid Therapy May Restore Vision in Blind Adults

Sooraj Shah ’24 Leber congenital amaurosis (LCA) is a family of retinal disorders, which result in severe vision loss from birth. LCA is one of the most common causes of childhood blindness, affecting approximately 2-3 infants for every 100,000 births. Currently, no direct cure for LCA exists, but recent developments in gene replacement therapy have shown promise in partially restoring retinal light-sensing ability with variability … Continue reading Use of Retinoid Therapy May Restore Vision in Blind Adults

Not A Coincidence: Adolescent Women Are More Likely To Suffer From Depression

Figure 1: Cambridge University research team finds adolescent women’s brain development and genes may make them more likely to suffer from depression. Zhifei Zeng ’23 Women are often perceived to be more prone to being sentimental. This apparent connection may not be coincidental, but rather related to the biological makeup of the female brain. Adolescence is a time of critical brain development, but it is … Continue reading Not A Coincidence: Adolescent Women Are More Likely To Suffer From Depression

COVID-19 Causes Increased Anxiety In Lung Cancer Patients

Figure 1: Stony Brook University research team finds significant increase in psychological stress among lung cancer patients during pandemic. Zhifei Zeng ’23 COVID-19, which has ravaged the world, is still a public health concern and there are multiple theories about the cause of severe COVID-19 infection in young people. Previous research on genetic factors associated with severe COVID-19 has been limited to the gene pool … Continue reading COVID-19 Causes Increased Anxiety In Lung Cancer Patients

Accidental EEG Recording of Dying Patient Offers Tentative Glimpse into Our Final Moments

Jessica George ’24 In our relentless pursuit for knowledge, perhaps one of the most perplexing questions to humankind is what happens when we die. Several individuals who have undergone near-death experiences (NDE) describe their “life flashing before their eyes.” There is also the classical theory of a hypoactive brain during the end stages of life, where the brain ceases all electrical activity. Contrary to this … Continue reading Accidental EEG Recording of Dying Patient Offers Tentative Glimpse into Our Final Moments