Announcing the SBYIR Research Symposium!

Attention all undergraduate students! If you have participated or are currently participating in faculty-mentored research, we at the Stony Brook Young Investigators Review understand that it has been difficult for you to participate in conferences and showcase your work. To give you an outlet by which you can not only present your research, but also gain insightful feedback from faculty on your work and presentation, … Continue reading Announcing the SBYIR Research Symposium!

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2020 Young Investigators Writing Competition Winners

The Stony Brook Young Investigators Review (SBYIR) is pleased to announce the results of the 2020 Young Investigators Writing Competition! Our competition invited high school students from Long Island to write brief articles in newspaper or literature review format to describe and engage the public in scientific societal controversies. Specifically, students entering grades 10-12 explored dilemmas regarding experimental therapy, neutral algorithms, environmental policy, and sustainable … Continue reading 2020 Young Investigators Writing Competition Winners

Fears and How Priming Can Help Overcome Them

Yukta Kulkarni ’22 Some of the most important topics covered by neuroscience research encompass memory retention. This type of research helps explain how much information brains can retain and how easily it is learned. However, does prior learning affect the ability to learn in the future? To answer this, Cole et al. blocked protein-kinase A (PKA) and extracellular signal-related mitogen-activated protein-kinase (ERK/MAPK) within the basolateral … Continue reading Fears and How Priming Can Help Overcome Them

Child anxiety disorders and symptoms closely associated with specific maternal anxiety disorders

Priyanshi Patel ’22 Social anxiety disorder (SAD) is one of the most prevalent and disabling anxiety disorders with an onset age of 13 years. SAD is a chronic disorder with adverse psychiatric, social, and educational outcomes, which is why it is important to prevent it by understanding its risk factors. One known risk factor is behavioral inhibition (BI), the withdrawal from unfamiliar situations, environments, and … Continue reading Child anxiety disorders and symptoms closely associated with specific maternal anxiety disorders

Effects of distractive and target stimuli on auditory neurons within mice brains

Joyce Chen ’23 Biological organisms are naturally stimulated by their environment. To avoid being overstimulated, animals use selective attention. By simply focusing on one thing, humans and other animals can essentially drown out other irrelevant stimuli. This phenomenon requires sensory regulation, especially auditory. To gain insight on how auditory neurons react to both irrelevant and target stimuli, Stony Brook University researcher Pan-tong Yao and his … Continue reading Effects of distractive and target stimuli on auditory neurons within mice brains

Diagnosis and management of Guillain–Barré syndrome in ten steps

Sabah Bari ’24 Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS) is a rare autoimmune disease characterized by an overactive immune system that causes damage to peripheral nerves, leading to loss of sensorimotor function starting at the extremities and spreading to the torso. Some symptoms of GBS are potentially fatal, such as respiratory failure, cardiac arrhythmias, blood pressure instability, which are all directly involved with the autonomic nervous system. The … Continue reading Diagnosis and management of Guillain–Barré syndrome in ten steps

Ageing: The Role of Ageism

Thumyat Noe ’23 Although the global average life expectancy has increased, there is little evidence to support that quality of life for older people has improved. Older adults are believed to be experiencing better health worldwide due to improvements in medical, psychological, and social resources, but the role of ageism in determining healthy aging is often disregarded. Ageism is a form of prejudice in which … Continue reading Ageing: The Role of Ageism

Melittin: A Natural Peptide from Bee Venom Which Induces Apoptosis in Human Leukemia Cells

Thumyat Noe ’23 Past research has shown that honeybee’s venom has the potential to treat various diseases such as arthritis, chronic pain, cancer, and atopic dermatitis. The venom mostly consists of peptides and low molecular weight compounds such as sugars and amino acids. Melittin is one of the peptides found within honeybee’s venom and possesses the most bioactive properties among all the compounds in the … Continue reading Melittin: A Natural Peptide from Bee Venom Which Induces Apoptosis in Human Leukemia Cells

The Impact of Pubertal Development on Anxiety Risk and Startle Habituation

Aditi Kaveti ‘23 As children begin pubertal development, they experience a host of changes that may contribute to feelings of anxiety, including increases in weight and height, changes in body shape, and hormonal fluctuations. In a study done in part by Felicia Jackson of the Department of Psychology at Stony Brook University, researchers examined the relationship between mean startle, startle habituation, pubertal development, behavioral inhibition … Continue reading The Impact of Pubertal Development on Anxiety Risk and Startle Habituation

Loss of Sense of Smell Caused by COVID-19

Aditi Kaveti ‘23 The coronavirus pandemic has changed our lifestyles as we knew it. As we find ways to stay safe during the pandemic, research continues to bring us new information about COVID-19. One of the earliest and most commonly reported indicators of COVID-19 is the temporary loss of smell, or anosmia. Olfactory cells are the body’s smell nerve cells that are stimulated by the … Continue reading Loss of Sense of Smell Caused by COVID-19

The Impact of Patient Intellectual Disability on Organ Transplantation Candidacy

Gwenyth Mercep ’22 Disqualifying patients with intellectual disabilities (ID) from receiving organ transplantation is an unfortunate reality in healthcare. Compared with the evidence-based criteria used to determine transplant eligibility, the ID model has the potential to be discriminatory and subjective [1]. The use of ID in transplant candidacy may stem from perceived worse adherence and outcomes for patients with ID, concern of penalties to transplant … Continue reading The Impact of Patient Intellectual Disability on Organ Transplantation Candidacy

Localization, Authenticity, & Intersectionality – Ingredients to the Effective Implementation of Environmental Policies

Lauren Avilla, Grade 12 The key to unlocking success in environmental policy has always been guided by the singular concept of sustainability. It has proven the backbone of many federal environmental policies such as the Clean Water Act (CWA), Clean Air Act (CAA), and the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA). Conceptually, the practice of fulfilling the needs of now while simultaneously maintaining resources for the … Continue reading Localization, Authenticity, & Intersectionality – Ingredients to the Effective Implementation of Environmental Policies

Humanity and Technological Innovation

Jillian Martin, Grade 12 Continual innovation is crucial within the scope of engineering and the advancement of society as a whole. Innovative ideas have the potential to improve living standards, increase efficiency, and provide overwhelming opportunities to those it reaches. Whether it be indoor plumbing, electricity, vaccines, automobiles, or smartphones, technological innovation has shaped every industry and facet of life. However, all things come at … Continue reading Humanity and Technological Innovation