Announcing the SBYIR Research Symposium!

Attention all undergraduate students! If you have participated or are currently participating in faculty-mentored research, we at the Stony Brook Young Investigators Review understand that it has been difficult for you to participate in conferences and showcase your work. To give you an outlet by which you can not only present your research, but also gain insightful feedback from faculty on your work and presentation, … Continue reading Announcing the SBYIR Research Symposium!

The Earliest Human Appearances in the Americas

Yukta Kulkarni ’22 Humans have been populating Earth for hundreds of thousands of years, mainly inhabiting areas in East and South Africa. It was thought that humans had first arrived in the Americas around 15,000 years ago. However, new findings from excavations at Chiquihuite Cave in central-northern Mexico provide evidence that humans could have been present thousands of years earlier than originally predicted, an estimation … Continue reading The Earliest Human Appearances in the Americas

Ethnic Diversity and Recall: Is there a connection?

Yukta Kulkarni ’22 People spend thirteen years of their lives, from around five to eighteen years old, in school, where they learn both academic content and social etiquette. They may then go on to university and reinforce these skills and knowledge. Thus, students require not only a good memory, but also the ability to collaborate with others. However, not all students benefit equally from working … Continue reading Ethnic Diversity and Recall: Is there a connection?

X-ray diffraction provides new gateway to analyze mummies

Sooraj Shah ’24 Since the 20th century discovery of the tomb of King Tutankamun, the excitement around discovering mummies has been a topic of controversy, particularly regarding how the mummies are handled once they are discovered. Unwrapping and disrupting the mummies’ final resting place is considered to be invasive. A study by Dr. Stuart Stock, a professor within the cell and molecular biology department at … Continue reading X-ray diffraction provides new gateway to analyze mummies

The preservation of proteins and lipids in mammoth rib bones

Joyce Chen ’23 Despite significant technological advances in the past decade, a great deal of mystery still surrounds the ancient animals that once roamed the earth. In order to learn about these organisms, biologists study the biomolecules that are found within fossils. Biomolecules include proteins and lipids, and their preservation allows scientists to understand and trace evolution. Due to a lack of research on the … Continue reading The preservation of proteins and lipids in mammoth rib bones

Dramatic pretend play games uniquely improve Emotional Control in young children

Thumyat Noe ’23 Social-emotional development is important in preschool children as these skills can predict children’s school readiness, school adjustment, and social functioning in the future. Furthermore, lack of social-emotional skills is often associated with aggression, low achievement, bullying, and substance abuse during adolescence. In an effort to prevent such associations, many schools have created programs that focus on fostering positive social-emotional development in children. … Continue reading Dramatic pretend play games uniquely improve Emotional Control in young children

Overexpression of FABP3 contributive to Aging Skeletal Muscle via ER stress

Sooraj Shah ’24 Sarcopenia is a disease which leads to the loss of muscle mass and function by skeletal muscle. According to Dr. Stephan von Haehling (2), a professor at Charité Medical School, the disease affects nearly 5-13% of adults 60-70 years of age, and rises to 11-50% of adults 80 years of age and older. While Sarcopenia is known to be caused by factors … Continue reading Overexpression of FABP3 contributive to Aging Skeletal Muscle via ER stress

Hyposalivation and its effect on oral health in elders

Panayiota Siskos ’23 The co-existence of systemic diseases and multiple medications causes elders to be more vulnerable to oral issues. Lower salivary flow (hyposalivation) is a common issue and may be due to xerostomia (when there is the feeling of having a dry mouth). Even though saliva production and composition are mostly age-dependent, medications can also influence salivary flow. Decrease of salivary flow may disrupt … Continue reading Hyposalivation and its effect on oral health in elders

Spring 2021 Journal Theme: Mysterious, Lost, and Hidden Science

During the 4.6 billion years since its formation, Earth has undergone constant change that has been accompanied by the evolution and extinction of several species and civilizations. Many scientists have dedicated their lives to studying the loss of biodiversity, the hidden secrets of mummies and archeology, or even the lost remedies and scientific knowledge of past civilizations. Hidden science is not just historical or buried … Continue reading Spring 2021 Journal Theme: Mysterious, Lost, and Hidden Science

Differences of Cognitive Offloading Usage among Individuals Performing Short Term Memory Tasks

Sooraj Shah ’24 Recalling a lot of information at one time is possible, but not feasible. Writing information down on a paper during a class or in the grocery store, for instance, are ways to reduce the strain of memorization within an individual. This concept is further defined as cognitive offloading, which can assist in overcoming the cognitive restraints in mentally retaining information. A study … Continue reading Differences of Cognitive Offloading Usage among Individuals Performing Short Term Memory Tasks

Neural Population Code Organization in Mouse Visual System

Panayiota Siskos ’23 While mice are useful for investigating components of visual perception, this research is limited by insufficient knowledge of the organization of the visual cortex of the mice. Visual information is processed via computations while traveling from the retina to lateral geniculated nucleus and visual cortices. The early visual system processes complex visual stimuli by encoding various stimulus attributes by individual neurons while … Continue reading Neural Population Code Organization in Mouse Visual System

Presence of Seizure-Inducing Lesions Observable with Brain Tonometry

Vignesh Subramanian ’24 Cortical dysplasia (CD) is a congenital disorder involving improper organization of layers of the brain, which generates pathological lesions on the organ’s surface and renders developing neurons unable to mature and connect with one another. Lesional tissue significantly increases risk of refractory epilepsy (seizures not responsive to medication) in the pediatric population, and complete surgical resection of this deformed tissue is a … Continue reading Presence of Seizure-Inducing Lesions Observable with Brain Tonometry

Hearing Loss and Cognition: The Role of Hearing Aids, Social Isolation and Depression

Sabah Bari ’24 Individuals with hearing loss have been correlated with low cognitive functioning and incident dementia. Cognitive impairment includes problems with memory, having trouble with learning new tasks, concentrating or making decisions that affect their everyday life. Dementia is a form of cognitive impairment, in the sense of, loss of memory, language and problem solving. Both conditions can limit an individual’s function and interfere … Continue reading Hearing Loss and Cognition: The Role of Hearing Aids, Social Isolation and Depression