The Role of Vegetables in Cancer Therapy

By Allan Mai ‘20 It’s no secret that eating vegetables improves your health in more ways than one. A recent study is adding to the repertoire of already known health benefits; benzyl isothiocynate (BITC), a compound found in cruciferous vegetables such as cabbage, broccoli, and cauliflower, is showing indications of a role in decreasing hepatic…

Focused Ultrasounds Increase Chemotherapy Drug Uptake

By Allan Mai ‘20 The blood-brain barrier (BBB) protects the brain from infections that enter through the bloodstream. However, this barrier also poses an enormous challenge for researchers developing drugs to specifically target the brain via the blood vessels. For brain tumors specifically, a current method for chemotherapy delivery are Gliadel Wafers: surgeons resect the…

Lasers, micro-needling, and platelet-rich plasma

By Ellie Teng ‘21 Advances in skin treatments have expanded to laser therapy, micro needling, and platelet rich plasma to restore and reverse the effects of aging and scarring or pigmentation. Restoring tone and reversing the effects of environmental and genetic aging through non surgical modalities have attracted a great deal of attention for their…

Mediterranean Diets and SGA

By Ellie Teng ‘21 Known for its appealing and delectable taste, the Mediterranean diet is very rich in nutrients. Olive oil, a main component of the Mediterranean diet, benefits the human health when consumed directly or indirectly, and is the main source of healthy fat in the diet. This study tests the effects of olive…

Stem cells in Dermatology and Anti-aging skin care

By Ellie Teng ‘21 Aging is a biological process that every organism must experience. It’s evident, however, that humans are especially concerned about the physical features associated with aging, which include fine lines and wrinkles on the face and skin. Many anti-aging skin treatments contain ingredients such as stem cells, which are advertised to prevent…

Clinical study confirms another benefit of eating crickets

By Nita Wong ‘21 While crickets are not a staple in the average American diet, more than 2 billion people around the world regularly consume insects, which are known to be rich in protein, vitamins, minerals, and healthy fats. A recent study conducted at the University of Wisconsin-Madison Nelson Institute for Environmental Studies and published…