Social Evaluation and Anxiety Can Affect Perception of Threats

Ayesha Azeem ’23 When we make decisions, a multitude of cognitive processes occur. One such factor involved is social evaluation, which may either enhance or hinder perceptual decisions. Perceptual decision-making is defined as choosing one option out of a set based on available sensory information. It is often observed when one perceives threatening stimuli, a response conserved through evolution. Thus, the determination of threatening stimuli … Continue reading Social Evaluation and Anxiety Can Affect Perception of Threats

Ivory Poaching in Elephants Is Causing Tusklessness in Elephants

Yukta Kulkarni ’22 Poaching is defined as the illegal hunting of animals, especially when some part of an animal is profitable. This type of wildlife exploitation has been occurring for years, harming multiple species and causing unforeseen evolutionary consequences. A prominent example of this is habitual ivory poaching, or the killing of both male and female elephants for their extremely valuable ivory tusks. In fact, … Continue reading Ivory Poaching in Elephants Is Causing Tusklessness in Elephants

Immunomodulatory Therapies Improve Long-Term Visual Outcomes Amid Optic Neuritis Preceding Late-Stage MS

Vignesh Subramanian ’24 Optic neuritis (ON) is a condition involving inflammation of the optic nerve that can cause its demyelination, or the destruction of the fatty tissue known as myelin that insulates and protects nerves. Although relatively rare, ON first manifests in young adulthood and can cause diminished visual acuity or blurriness, poor pupillary constriction, ophthalmalgia (eye pain), and the inability to see out of one … Continue reading Immunomodulatory Therapies Improve Long-Term Visual Outcomes Amid Optic Neuritis Preceding Late-Stage MS

Formation of Night Clouds on Venus May Have Prevented Earth-like Conditions

Sooraj Shah ’24  Venus shares many similarities with Earth, including approximate size and mass. Venus’ surface temperature, however, is much hotter and contains a much thicker atmosphere consisting of carbon dioxide. For years, scientists have made estimates that Venus once was a thriving planet containing the resources for life like Earth. A research study led by astrophysicist Martin Turbet, in collaboration with the University of … Continue reading Formation of Night Clouds on Venus May Have Prevented Earth-like Conditions

Deforestation May Affect Worker Productivity in Rural Communities

Ayesha Azeem ’23 Trees are known for their cooling services through shade and evapotranspiration, the process by which water is transferred from land to the atmosphere through evaporation. Unfortunately, tropical deforestation has accelerated exponentially in the past century, leading to the elimination of these cooling services in low latitude countries. Without such cooling services, local temperatures can increase over a single season, which affects not … Continue reading Deforestation May Affect Worker Productivity in Rural Communities

Investigating the Efficacy of Blue-Light Lenses in Reducing Eye Strain

Robyn Rutgers ’24 Computer usage is integral to daily life; however, prolonged electronic usage is associated with vision-related problems, or “computer vision syndrome.” Symptoms include blurred vision, dry eyes, redness, and headaches. Some have hypothesized that computer vision syndrome is a result of exposure to blue light emitted from computer screens, causing businesses to market blue-light-blocking lenses as a potential solution. However, a lack of … Continue reading Investigating the Efficacy of Blue-Light Lenses in Reducing Eye Strain

Dopamine Circuits: Investigating Relationships Between Dopamine Dysregulation and Midbrain Circuits

Daphne Siozios ’23 Dopamine (DA) is a behavioral neuromodulator that controls the function of the central nervous system through a variety of roles from memory processing and perception to learning and habit formation. The mesolimbic DA pathway, which travels specifically through the midbrain, has been linked to neural deficits caused by a lack of dopamine neurons in the striatum. While research regarding DA’s dysregulation has … Continue reading Dopamine Circuits: Investigating Relationships Between Dopamine Dysregulation and Midbrain Circuits

Money Matters: Investigating Neural Responses to Monetary and Social Feedback

Thumyat Noe ’23 Depression and social anxiety disorders are two of the most common psychopathologies in adults. One way to identify these disorders is by looking at event-related potentials (ERPs) which are measurable brain responses to stimuli. “Reward positivity” is an event-related potential that reflects neural positivity toward rewards and activation of a reinforcement learning system. Previous studies suggest that smaller reward positivity potentials correlate … Continue reading Money Matters: Investigating Neural Responses to Monetary and Social Feedback

Familial Economic Well-Being In Relation to Children’s Personal Development

Ishmam Khan ’25 According to the Federal Ministry for Family Affairs, Senior Citizens, Women and Youth, almost 20% of German children are part of a single-parent household or stepfamily. Previous research has shown the relationship between the “complexity” of a child’s family– specifically, the degree of deviance from a traditional nuclear family– and a child’s mental well-being. There has also been a scientifically noted connection … Continue reading Familial Economic Well-Being In Relation to Children’s Personal Development

High-Fat Diets in Combination With Triclosan Linked to Non-alcoholic Liver Disease

Daphne Siozios ’23 NAFLD, more commonly known as nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, is one of the most prominent chronic liver conditions in the country and is characterized by the accumulation of fat in hepatocytes (liver cells). A cousin of NAFLD, nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), is a condition that both encompasses the deposition of fat in the liver and inflammation of the organ. Fibroblast growth factor 21 … Continue reading High-Fat Diets in Combination With Triclosan Linked to Non-alcoholic Liver Disease

CaCl2-CaO Mixtures May Decrease Radioactivity Levels in Contaminated Nuclear Wastes

Thumyat Noe ’23 On March 11th, 2011, an earthquake in northeastern Japan caused leakage of radionuclides from the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power plant. Fukushima now stores the radioactive waste in designated locations, but there is an immediate need to decrease the radioactivity levels present in the stored wastes to prevent other accidents. Among the radionuclides present in contaminated wastes, scientists have determined radioactive cesium as … Continue reading CaCl2-CaO Mixtures May Decrease Radioactivity Levels in Contaminated Nuclear Wastes

Using Modified Guide Strands to Broaden Therapeutic Use of miRNAs for Breast Cancer

Ishmam Khan ’25 Triple-negative breast cancers (TNBCs) are a type of breast cancer that does not respond to traditional hormonal therapy. Despite TNBCs encompassing 10-20% of all breast cancers, TNBCs are significantly more aggressive than other breast cancers and have worse overall survival rates.  These cancers often offer patients a poor prognosis due to their high rates of proliferation and chemoresistance. A research group at … Continue reading Using Modified Guide Strands to Broaden Therapeutic Use of miRNAs for Breast Cancer