Our Attachment Styles Can Be an Indicator for Anxiety

Ayesha Azeem ‘23 Anxiety is one of the most prevalent diagnosed mental illnesses in the world as well as one of the leading causes of poor health and increased mortality across all mental disorders. Thus, researching and learning about the contributing factors and etiology of anxiety is very important for many clinical psychologists like Dr. Kristen Bernard at Stony Brook University, who seeks to study … Continue reading Our Attachment Styles Can Be an Indicator for Anxiety

To Hide A Body

Wendy Wu ’22 From podcasts to documentaries, the world has an odd fascination with violent crime. Even decades after they occur, grisly murders are picked apart by the media and public. Another group with particular interest in murders are forensic psychologists. Their research has delved into the psyche of murderers and the factors that lead up to them committing crime. This has helped in developing … Continue reading To Hide A Body

The Effects of Mental Health of Young Children on their Adolescent Functioning

Yukta Kulkarni ’22 Psychopathology is the study of mental disorders, which can be prevalent in all age groups. In fact, children can be tested and diagnosed as early as preschool. It has been observed that young children who show symptoms of disorders  may endure the same symptoms at an exacerbated level in later childhood or even adolescence. However, little is known about how these disorders … Continue reading The Effects of Mental Health of Young Children on their Adolescent Functioning

Collective Narcissism and Its Social Consequences

Sabah Bari ’24 Narcissism is a personality disorder in which individuals exaggerate their self importance and believe they deserve excessive attention and admiration. This disorder can be prevalent within a group, creating collective narcissism. With collective narcissism, the group seeks validation from external support. This group is typically formed by individuals who share similar beliefs such as their political viewpoints. Since members of this group … Continue reading Collective Narcissism and Its Social Consequences

Visual processing in adults with dyslexia is determined by duration of fixation periods

Joyce Chen ’23 Our fascinating ability to read is often overlooked and taken for granted. Reading requires a high level of cooperation between the eyes and the brain. The eyes are immediately able to formulate words and meanings out of the letter combinations by pausing over the text. This pause is a vital part of reading. Dyslexia is a condition in which individuals have difficulty … Continue reading Visual processing in adults with dyslexia is determined by duration of fixation periods

The Gratitude Visit: Student Reflections on a Positive Psychology Experiential Learning Exercise

Thumyat Noe ’23 Positive psychology is the study of human strengths and virtues, which includes psychological factors that enhance quality of life and various social experiences. Positive psychology has become a popular topic of research due to possible associations with enhancing mental health. In particular, positive psychology interventions that promote gratefulness appear to be successful in fostering good mental health. Gratefulness is a well-studied construct … Continue reading The Gratitude Visit: Student Reflections on a Positive Psychology Experiential Learning Exercise

Visual cues aid in perceiving accented speech

Priyanshi Patel ’22 Previous research has shown that lip reading helps understand difficult speech. However, little research has been conducted on the role of visual information in perceiving accented speech, a type of difficult speech. Communication between native and nonnative English speakers is very common, especially on university campuses. There often exists a language barrier between native students and international students or instructors or teaching … Continue reading Visual cues aid in perceiving accented speech

The importance of first impressions

Joyce Chen ’23 When it comes to meeting someone new, a first impression is especially significant. Naturally, humans want to create an everlasting effect or influence on others from their very first impression; However, there are several drawbacks, one of which being dominance. A study conducted by Laura Clark at the University of Lincoln aims to investigate the judgments of people based on the facial … Continue reading The importance of first impressions

Threatening cues have a larger effect on perception than neutral cues

Panayiota Siskos ’23 The theory of predictive coding states that the brain continuously creates a mental model of the surrounding environment using prior knowledge from memory. This mental model is then used to predict sensory input, such as anticipating a smell, a sound, or a touch.  A group of researchers from Stony Brook University and Columbia University studied the effect of threatening cues on sensory … Continue reading Threatening cues have a larger effect on perception than neutral cues

Examining the Benefits of Unique Coloration for Male Trinidad Guppies

Fatin Chowdhury ’20 The predisposition of organisms in seeking certain phenotypic traits in mates is an oft-observed aspect of the natural world, with sexual selection being a well-studied phenomenon. However, unique coloration specifically often seems to be more linked to lessened survivability (due to an inability to camouflage in environments), or phenomena such as aposematism, where unique colors serve as a warning for predators. In … Continue reading Examining the Benefits of Unique Coloration for Male Trinidad Guppies

How Do We Recognize Dog Emotions?

Ayesha Azeem ‘23 We humans are very complex creatures. When we spend a lot of time in close association with a species, we tend to treat them as if they are humans as well, and we can decipher their emotions clearly. With the expression of emotions, we can communicate our motivations, responses and needs to others. Recognizing animals’ emotions can be beneficial, as it may … Continue reading How Do We Recognize Dog Emotions?

Increased Levels of Gray Matter in the Brain May Lead to Psychopathic Qualities

Joyce Chen ’23 Psychopathy is a genetic mutation in the brain that causes individuals to have egotistical tendencies. Such tendencies can lead to unwarranted actions such as crime or even murder, as psychopaths do not keep the wellbeing of others in mind. However, some psychopaths are capable of keeping their dark thoughts hidden very well, thereby having seemingly socially acceptable behavior. Recently, researchers from the … Continue reading Increased Levels of Gray Matter in the Brain May Lead to Psychopathic Qualities