Solar Cells Could Power Medical Implants

  By Rideeta Raquib ‘19 Electronic implants are usually powered by batteries. Rechargeable batteries, which are rare, require continuous charging and primary batteries require implant replacements if they are completely used up. Thus, lead researcher Dr. Lukas Bereuter, and his research team at the University of Bern in Switzerland investigated whether sunlight could serve as an alternative source of energy to power medical implants.   Models … Continue reading Solar Cells Could Power Medical Implants

Stem Cells Successfully Generate a Fully Functional Liver

    by Rideeta Raquib Approximately 30 million people are affected by liver disease globally, and the quest to find donors for liver transplants is difficult. There is a lack of functional livers available compared to the liver disease patient population. In some cases, a portion of the liver from a living donor is sufficient for regular function. Stem cells are unspecialized cells that can differentiate … Continue reading Stem Cells Successfully Generate a Fully Functional Liver

A Promising Therapeutic Compound for Huntington’s Disease

By Jalwa Alfroz There is currently no available treatment that can promisingly cure the neurodegenerative disorder Huntington’s disease (HD). HD is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder caused by an inherited defect in a single gene encoding the highly conserved protein, Huntington. It is also an autosomal dominant defect, which means that a person only needs one copy of the defective gene to develop the disorder. The … Continue reading A Promising Therapeutic Compound for Huntington’s Disease

Emotional Self-Awareness in Children with Autism

by Amanda Ng (’17) Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) is one of the most common developmental disorders found in children, and while there has been progress in research since its first diagnosis, there is still much that remains to be discovered. Individuals with ASD have trouble communicating and interacting, and even the highest-functioning ASD patients can have trouble picking up social cues or others’ emotions. However, … Continue reading Emotional Self-Awareness in Children with Autism

Long Term Trends for Wind Speed

by Jenna Mallon (’18) Wind speed is an important area of climate study because it has lasting effects on climate variations. In the Southern Hemisphere, studies involving wind speed are unavailable, despite there being research on air temperature and precipitation. As a result, Luiz Felipe N. Cardoso from the Department of Meteorology at the Federal University of Rio de Janeiro and a team of researchers … Continue reading Long Term Trends for Wind Speed

Complexin induces a conformational change of the SNARE complex

by Aaron Gochman (’18) Intercellular communication in the central nervous system occurs at a synapse, the gap between two neurons. The presynaptic neuron releases a chemical messenger known as a neurotransmitter, which diffuses across the synapse and relays the signal to the postsynaptic cell. The process of releasing the neurotransmitter from the presynaptic cell is quite complicated. The mechanism includes packing the neurotransmitter inside a … Continue reading Complexin induces a conformational change of the SNARE complex

The Secret Behind Increased Wisdom

by Lillian Pao (’18) There is no concrete definition of wisdom. However, there are some repetitive themes that encompass the idea of wisdom, such as the use of knowledge from an experience, careful decision-making, and lowered anxiety during complex situations. In a recent study, professors of the University of Chicago concluded that there may be a connection between somatic, or physical, practices and wisdom. Although … Continue reading The Secret Behind Increased Wisdom

How Childhood Trauma May Be Surmounted

by Julia Newman ’19 Past studies display that children exposed to traumatic experiences, such as death of a family member, are prone to developing not only mental issues, but also issues concerning their physical health. However, more recent research proves that these traumas, also known as adverse childhood experiences (ACEs), and their effects can be overcome if the children are living in a healthy environment. This study, conducted by … Continue reading How Childhood Trauma May Be Surmounted

DNA Packing Mechanisms in Viruses Revealed

by Julia Newman ’19 New studies on the packing of DNA in viruses show that it sometimes behaves like a fluid and other times like a solid, similar to a tube of toothpaste or a cup of sand. For this reason, it was difficult in the past for scientists to determine how DNA is packed within a viral shell. However, it turns out that viruses actually have a … Continue reading DNA Packing Mechanisms in Viruses Revealed

More Than a Structural Component: The Vast Biological Functions of Sphingolipids

By Ashwin Kelkar Introduction What constitutes a cell?  In a very general sense, the first successful cell-like structures necessitated a biological barrier that would mediate the flow of molecules into and out of their “bodies.”  What developed was the phospholipid bilayer, a semi-permeable membrane intermeshed with various proteins to regulate the passage of important bioactive molecules – ones that regulate cellular responses – in order … Continue reading More Than a Structural Component: The Vast Biological Functions of Sphingolipids