Repairing Damaged Vocal Cords

Aditi Kaveti ’23 Human vocal cords are structures in the larynx, just above the trachea, that vibrate to create a buzzing tone that becomes what we know as the human voice. This vibration works through resonance, which is the shaping and amplification of sound waves. In patients with laryngeal cancer, vocal cords are at risk due to the mass forming on the glottis. Signs of … Continue reading Repairing Damaged Vocal Cords

How do Stem Cells Transduce Signals Sensed by Mechanical Vibration?

Aditi Kaveti ’23 The field of medicine was revolutionized by the discovery of induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) techniques and the remarkable ability of these cells to solve various limitations in cell culture, including cellular proliferation and potency. Bioengineers are working to take advantage of the ability of these cells to improve cellular manufacturing and mechanization efficiency. A recent field of interest has been the … Continue reading How do Stem Cells Transduce Signals Sensed by Mechanical Vibration?

Fall 2021 Journal is Published!

Link to Journal: https://issuu.com/younginvestigatorsreview/docs/sbyir_fall_2021_journal_final_for_issuu_2 Every semester, SBYIR publishes a science journal highlighting research and topics in STEM. This journal is a culmination of effort from our writers and three branches– editorial, layout, and cabinet. This year’s journal theme is the Science of Wellbeing.  Wellbeing is defined as the state of being healthy, happy, and comfortable. When we consider our own wellbeing, we consider what is in … Continue reading Fall 2021 Journal is Published!

Muscle Preservation and Metabolism-Associated Genes Show Activity During Diapause

Joyce Chen ’23 As time progresses, all living organisms will age, decay, and perish. However, there are certain animal species that can halt their biological clocks and no longer develop. This state is known as diapause. The African Killifish are known organisms that can undergo diapause in order to survive unfavorable conditions, such as dry periods in the environment. Many of these fish remain in … Continue reading Muscle Preservation and Metabolism-Associated Genes Show Activity During Diapause

How the Motor Cortex Plays a Role in Parkinson’s Disease

Ayesha Azeem ’23 Parkinson’s Disease is a brain disorder that leads to shaking, stiffness, and difficulty with walking and balance. The symptoms gradually begin and get progressively worse over time. Although neuroscientists understand the role of neuron and dopamine loss in Parkison’s Disease, little is known about how dopaminergic modulation affects brain regions that are involved in the control of voluntary movement. In the primary … Continue reading How the Motor Cortex Plays a Role in Parkinson’s Disease

Elastin-like, Polypeptide-Based Bio-Ink: The Future of Bioprinting

Daphne Siozios ’23 3-D bioprinting is a novel field that continues to pave the way in establishing alternative forms of medicine to otherwise traditional techniques of tissue remodeling. Bio-ink, the material used to produce artificial live tissue through three-dimensional means, must meet certain requirements in resolution, shape, and biocompatibility (the material must not cause an adverse response in the host organism). While certain biomaterials used … Continue reading Elastin-like, Polypeptide-Based Bio-Ink: The Future of Bioprinting

Investigating the Efficacy of Blue-Light Lenses in Reducing Eye Strain

Robyn Rutgers ’24 Computer usage is integral to daily life; however, prolonged electronic usage is associated with vision-related problems, or “computer vision syndrome.” Symptoms include blurred vision, dry eyes, redness, and headaches. Some have hypothesized that computer vision syndrome is a result of exposure to blue light emitted from computer screens, causing businesses to market blue-light-blocking lenses as a potential solution. However, a lack of … Continue reading Investigating the Efficacy of Blue-Light Lenses in Reducing Eye Strain

High-Fat Diets in Combination With Triclosan Linked to Non-alcoholic Liver Disease

Daphne Siozios ’23 NAFLD, more commonly known as nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, is one of the most prominent chronic liver conditions in the country and is characterized by the accumulation of fat in hepatocytes (liver cells). A cousin of NAFLD, nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), is a condition that both encompasses the deposition of fat in the liver and inflammation of the organ. Fibroblast growth factor 21 … Continue reading High-Fat Diets in Combination With Triclosan Linked to Non-alcoholic Liver Disease

CaCl2-CaO Mixtures May Decrease Radioactivity Levels in Contaminated Nuclear Wastes

Thumyat Noe ’23 On March 11th, 2011, an earthquake in northeastern Japan caused leakage of radionuclides from the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power plant. Fukushima now stores the radioactive waste in designated locations, but there is an immediate need to decrease the radioactivity levels present in the stored wastes to prevent other accidents. Among the radionuclides present in contaminated wastes, scientists have determined radioactive cesium as … Continue reading CaCl2-CaO Mixtures May Decrease Radioactivity Levels in Contaminated Nuclear Wastes

Building a Better Battery: An Alternative to Lithium Ion Batteries

Robyn Rutgers ’24 Due to the negative effects of nonrenewable energy, scientists and environmentalists are trying to shift to cleaner energy sources, such as wind and solar power. One obstacle that engineers face in designing clean-energy solutions is the inefficiency of storing the generated energy, often resulting in large amounts of wasted energy. However, the development of advanced batteries would allow for more efficient storage … Continue reading Building a Better Battery: An Alternative to Lithium Ion Batteries

Can We Control Our Dopamine?

Aditi Kaveti ’23 Dopamine is a notorious molecule, with effects ranging from heightened sense of happiness and increased energy, to anxiety and difficulty sleeping. It is involved in cognitive processing related to reward and pleasure. Research into this molecule offers a wide range of study as scientists attempt to understand the dynamics and neuromodulation that occurs in the brain. Conrad Foo, a graduate student at … Continue reading Can We Control Our Dopamine?

Deep(ly) Learning About Deep Learning

Ishmam Khan ’25 Machine learning is the ability of artificial intelligence to build a model based on previously collected data and use it to identify patterns in a way that simulates human behavior. Many applications branch off from machine learning, such as bioinformatics, the intersection of technology and biology. Recently, researchers at Stony Brook University studied a process called deep learning, a subset of machine … Continue reading Deep(ly) Learning About Deep Learning