Adélie penguins are at risk of extinction by climate change

By Melanie Karniewich, Class of 2025 Climate change is becoming more alarming at an increasing rate across the globe, affecting humanity and other life. Associate professor of ecology and evolution Heather Lynch and other researchers at Stony Brook University traveled to visit Adélie penguin colonies in Penguin Point, Devil Island, Vortex Island, and Cockburn Island. Comparing the population sizes with the severity of climate change … Continue reading Adélie penguins are at risk of extinction by climate change

Title: A genetic change delivered via gel treatment for Epidermolysis bullosa patients shows promise

By Melanie Karniewich, Class of 2025 Epidermolysis bullosa (EB) is a rare genetic condition that causes serious blisters to the skin from minor occurrences like rubbing or scratching the skin. In severe cases, blistering can happen inside the body like the mouth or lining of the stomach. Mutations in EB disable genes for the specific proteins that allow the layers of someone’s skin and the … Continue reading Title: A genetic change delivered via gel treatment for Epidermolysis bullosa patients shows promise

Title: EEG Analysis Reveals Association Between Parkinson’s Disease with Visual Hallucinations and Epileptic Discharges

By: Jessica George, Class of 2024 Figure 1: Psychosis in Parkinson’s Disease (PD) is characterized by visual hallucinations (VHs). Psychosis in Parkinson’s Disease (PD) is characterized by visual hallucinations (VHs). These VHs have a significant impact on patient’s lives and serve as a reliable predictor for future nursing home institutionalization. Several disorders such as Charles Bonnet syndrome and temporal lobe epilepsy have similar features to … Continue reading Title: EEG Analysis Reveals Association Between Parkinson’s Disease with Visual Hallucinations and Epileptic Discharges

Title: Exercise was successfully able to restore brain insulin responsiveness in overweight and obese individuals living a sedentary life.

By: Jessica George, Class of 2024  Figure 1: Exercise is a natural and cost effective option to improving health, unlike certain medications. When the brain is resistant to insulin, the body tends to gain weight and distribute fat unfavorably. Resistance to insulin is one of the main characteristics of disorders such as type 2 diabetes and obesity. Today, it is unknown whether it is possible … Continue reading Title: Exercise was successfully able to restore brain insulin responsiveness in overweight and obese individuals living a sedentary life.

Title: Listen to Your Heart: The Risk of Spatial Environmental Factors on CVD-related and All-cause Mortality.

By Peter Gillespie, Class of 2025 Figure 1 Spatial environmental factors, such as an individual’s exposure to air pollution, may increase one’s risk of mortality. Recent research from Dr. Paola Boffetta and his colleagues suggest that spatial and environmental factors around us can negatively affect our well-being. Dr. Boffetta and his team conducted a study that assesses how spatial environmental factors (SEF), or our proximity … Continue reading Title: Listen to Your Heart: The Risk of Spatial Environmental Factors on CVD-related and All-cause Mortality.

Title: Increased Movement of Cancer Cells in Fluids of High Viscosity Hints at Possible Control Mechanism

By Sooraj Shah, Class of 2024 Figure 1 Observing activity of cancer cells in fluids of increasing viscosity may provide a mode of treatment via limiting this activity  With more than 1.9 million individuals in the US being diagnosed with cancer each year, research revolving around the behavior of cancer cells is an important aspect of the search for better treatments. The study of cancer … Continue reading Title: Increased Movement of Cancer Cells in Fluids of High Viscosity Hints at Possible Control Mechanism

Title: As the Covid Pandemic Grew, Concern for Climate Change Shriveled

By Sooraj Shah, Class of 2024 Figure 1 As Covid-19 pandemic grows, concerns for climate change dwindle The COVID-19 pandemic has been featured on every television and newspaper since early 2020. Social media platforms were also covered with news about the virus including deaths, cases, and variants. As COVID grew, the coverage revolving around other public concerns seemingly took a back seat, one of these … Continue reading Title: As the Covid Pandemic Grew, Concern for Climate Change Shriveled

Title: Investigating the Metabolism of Cancer

By Julia Chivu, Class of 2024 Figure 3 Woman ingesting a pill. A new drug has been developed to target the metabolism of cancer. Associate Professor Paul M. Bingham and Research Assistant Professor Zuzana Zachar from Stony Brook University developed a unique class of anticancer drugs–including the first-in-class and FDA-approved drug CPI-613. A first-in-class drug produces new treatment options or outcomes by exploring an unprecedented … Continue reading Title: Investigating the Metabolism of Cancer

Title: Heart Medication as Potential Treatment for Alcohol Use Disorder 

By Julia Chivu, Class of 2024 Figure 2 Cervical cancer cells. Heart medication may serve a different purpose than its intended use. According to the National Institute of Health and other research partners, spironolactone may treat alcohol use disorder. Alcohol use disorder (AUD) is a brain disorder associated with chronic alcohol abuse, often causing increased rates of morbidity, mortality, and poverty. Since there are limited … Continue reading Title: Heart Medication as Potential Treatment for Alcohol Use Disorder 

Brief Digital Interventions Can Alleviate Adolescent Depressive Symptoms

Vignesh Subramanian ’24 Depression is a mood disorder involving persistent feelings of dejection or hopelessness, difficulty with control of emotions, and loss of interest or pleasure in regular activities. As depressive disorders are increasingly recognized as a legitimate medical issue and treatment is destigmatized, younger generations in the United States have consistently reported higher rates of experiencing such conditions. However, less than half of afflicted … Continue reading Brief Digital Interventions Can Alleviate Adolescent Depressive Symptoms

Novel Form of Noninvasive Neurosurgery Selectively Lesions Faulty Neural Circuitry

Vignesh Subramanian ’24 A number of movement disorders and motor neuron diseases, including focal epilepsy, Parkinson’s disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, progressive muscular atrophy, and multiple sclerosis, are recognized as medically intractable or capable of becoming so. Intractable conditions lack known etiologies and have no established courses of treatment, with those in the neurological sphere often characterized by resistance to neural activity-suppressing medications (e.g. muscle relaxants, … Continue reading Novel Form of Noninvasive Neurosurgery Selectively Lesions Faulty Neural Circuitry

The Impact of Intestinal Microorganisms Should Not be Underestimated: Western-Style Diets May Lead to a Higher Risk of Colorectal Cancer

Zhifei Zeng ’23 Diet and nutrition are considered to be key factors in the development of colorectal cancer. Previous experiments have shown that a Western diet—with high intake of red and processed meats, sugar, and refined grains, and low intake of vegetables—can induce systemic and intestinal inflammation. These intestinal inflammations may alter populations of intestinal microorganisms. Many intestinal bacteria have been found to cause colorectal … Continue reading The Impact of Intestinal Microorganisms Should Not be Underestimated: Western-Style Diets May Lead to a Higher Risk of Colorectal Cancer