Tfh13: The Cells Involved In An Allergic Reaction

Mariam Malik ’22 Anaphylaxis is the biological reaction of the body to an allergy, in which airways are constricted and blood pressure suddenly drops. Anaphylactic shock can result from various allergies, including food and insect stings. Previous research has shown that during an allergic reaction, the immune system releases high levels of high-affinity Immunoglobin (IgE) antibodies, which then strongly bind to allergens to form an … Continue reading Tfh13: The Cells Involved In An Allergic Reaction

The Genetic Role of Left-Handedness

Ellie Teng ’21 90% of the population are right- handed, so what is different about individuals who are left- handed? Handedness was previously known to be partially affected by the genome; twin studies showed that genes account for about 25% of the variation in handedness. Researchers at the University of Oxford sought to connect the genetic difference to areas of the brain that control language. … Continue reading The Genetic Role of Left-Handedness

The Use of Focused Ultrasound for Enhanced Delivery of Gene Therapy Across the Blood-Brain-Barrier

Jorge Pincay ‘20 Huntington’s disease (HD) is an autosomal dominant neurodegenerative disease that results in the degradation of nerve cells in the brain over time. This disease is the result of a DNA mutation — a cytosine-adenine-guanine (CAG) trinucleotide repeat expansion– that occurs in the gene that encodes for the huntingtin (Htt) protein. This repeat expansion causes a highly toxic form of the Htt protein … Continue reading The Use of Focused Ultrasound for Enhanced Delivery of Gene Therapy Across the Blood-Brain-Barrier

Enhanced mRNA Gene Therapy for Critical Limb Ischemia

Jorge Pincay ‘20 Critical limb ischemia (CLI) is a cardiovascular condition characterized by severely narrowed arteries resulting from the buildup of plaque. This narrowing of the arteries  significantly reduces blood flow to the hands, feet, and legs and may lead to amputation of the affected limbs. Most patients suffering from CLI need to undergo some form of a revascularization procedure in order to combat this … Continue reading Enhanced mRNA Gene Therapy for Critical Limb Ischemia

Glutamate Receptor GLR-3 Encodes for Evolutionary Cold-Sensing Receptor

Simran Kaur ’20 The capacity to detect cold temperatures is essential for many living organisms because cold temperatures can cause detrimental effects like severe soft-tissue damage and hypothermia. Some organisms have evolved the presence of thermoreceptors, which are specific nerve endings that are sensitive to changes in temperature and exist in the skin, skeletal muscle, and the hypothalamus. Thermoreceptors relay electrical signals to the central … Continue reading Glutamate Receptor GLR-3 Encodes for Evolutionary Cold-Sensing Receptor

Role of Mitochondrial Gene TFAM in The Progression of Renal Disease

Simran Kaur ‘20 Kidney fibrosis, the accumulation of excess tissue, is the last pathway in end-stage renal failure. Examination of kidneys afflicted with renal disease in both animal and human models has shown a defect in the function of mitochondria. Mitochondria are responsible for the production of energy (ATP) in the cell, funding the processes of toxic waste removal from the blood and the regulation … Continue reading Role of Mitochondrial Gene TFAM in The Progression of Renal Disease

HIV Successfully Removed from Animal Genomes

Ellie Teng ‘21 The human immunodeficiency virus type one (HIV-1) is responsible for infecting millions worldwide. Currently, antiretroviral therapy (ART) is being used to slow HIV progression; however, as soon as this treatment is stopped, HIV-1 is reactivated and progresses to acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). The reactivation of HIV-1 following the cessation of ART is as a result of the virus’ ability to integrate its … Continue reading HIV Successfully Removed from Animal Genomes

Reductions in Complete Rat Serum Yields Promising Results in Whole Embryo Culture

Nomrota Majumder ‘21 Whole Embryo Culture (WEC) came about in the 1950s as a way to observe patterns in mammalian development, investigate birth defects, and analyze explanted organogenesis-stage rodent embryos. Since then, it has been a very treasured technique in biological research methods. Since WEC is conducted in vitro, a serum properly suited for an embryo is crucial to the process, and ever since its … Continue reading Reductions in Complete Rat Serum Yields Promising Results in Whole Embryo Culture

Invasion of the Gboxins: Inhibiting the Proliferation of Glioblastoma Cells

By Riya Gandhi ‘22 The aggressive proliferation of glioblastoma cells is characteristic of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), a fatal cancer of the brain. As much as treatments may help, patients with this cancer typically relapse. Furthermore, radiotherapy and chemotherapy unintentionally target and poison normal proliferating cells, thereby harming the wellbeing of the patients. However, under principle investigator Dr. Yufeng Shi, researchers at the Cancer Biology & … Continue reading Invasion of the Gboxins: Inhibiting the Proliferation of Glioblastoma Cells

Metabolic Reactions Activated During 58-hour Fasting

By Ellie Teng ‘21 Fasting is an ancient component in numerous religions and cultures. Individuals seeking weight loss often practice fasting, making it a prominent topic in the nutrition field. A team of scientists from the Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology Graduate University and Kyoto University recently found that fasting comes with innumerable health benefits. Blood samples from four healthy individuals who fasted for … Continue reading Metabolic Reactions Activated During 58-hour Fasting