NSC-Derived Antibody Proves a Selective NSC Marker

Vignesh Subramanian ’24 Neural stem cells (NSCs) are multipotent cells capable of differentiating into the major types of mature cells in the central nervous system (CNS) – neurons and glia – and giving rise to unlimited generations of those cells. Alongside progenitor cells, which are descended from NSCs and differentiate into specific target cells, NSCs are critical in advancing neurogenesis, the development of neurons from … Continue reading NSC-Derived Antibody Proves a Selective NSC Marker

Labeling High-ranking ADHD Genes for Future Diagnosis and Treatment

Yukta Kulkarni ’22 Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is a common disorder prevalent in both children and adults with symptoms such as inattention, hyperactivity, and impulsiveness. The identification of certain genes associated with ADHD can improve both the understanding of the neural mechanisms that transpire and the ability to accurately diagnose and treat people with ADHD. By researching and integrating data from various research publications, … Continue reading Labeling High-ranking ADHD Genes for Future Diagnosis and Treatment

The Future of Synthetic Biology

Aditi Kaveti ‘23 Natural genetic processes can lose their function over long-term evolution if that function requires too many resources to continue throughout generations. Scientists have been studying evolutionary reversibility, which is the ability to regain a lost function, in order to repair natural systems that have lost such valuable evolutionary processes. To this end in the field of synthetic biology, researchers employ and manipulate … Continue reading The Future of Synthetic Biology

Neuroanatomical Variation in Dogs

Panayiota Siskos ’23 The selective breeding of dogs by humans has led to variation in the brain across different breeds. Selectively breeding dogs for traits and abilities has been a recent occurrence  in evolution, and genetic research shows behavioral variation is heritable. Behavioral specializations depend on neural specializations, and strong selection pressure exhibits that brain differences between dog breeds correlate with differences in behavior. Selection … Continue reading Neuroanatomical Variation in Dogs

The EMS Project

Wendy Wu ’22 Microbial life is usually associated with bacteria and archaea, often overlooking the existence of protists, eukaryotic microbes. Recent research has shown protists to play vital roles in their environment, especially in driving marine biogeochemical cycles and food webs. The ocean, which spans 70% of Earth’s surface, is home to a variety of microbial life. Despite this fact, there is a lack of … Continue reading The EMS Project

Live Imaging of Cell Cycle State in Metazoa

Gaurav Sharma ’22 An important part of development of any organism is differential regulation of the cell cycle since it leads to cell specification and differentiation. The cell cycle states and their coordination are already well-studied, but the mechanistic connection between the cell cycle and differentiated cell behavior is still to be determined. The challenge is finding a reliable live cell imaging tool that can … Continue reading Live Imaging of Cell Cycle State in Metazoa

Activating the Enzyme of Youth

Ashley Goland ’23 The cause of aging has long been one of mankind’s favorite mysteries to entertain, and as science advances, its secrets are gradually being stripped away. Studying chromosome structure revealed sections called telomeres, sequences of repeated nucleotides on the ends of a chromosome that serve to prevent its deterioration, and from this discovery came a revelation about age. Aging-related diseases such as dementia, … Continue reading Activating the Enzyme of Youth

Anchor-Cell Invasion Regulation Network Discovered

Gaurav Sharma ’22 Invasion through the basement membrane is essential to many cellular and biological processes such as embryonic development, immune response, tissue development, and metastasis. The components and mechanism of basement membrane invasion is known. There are four transcription factors that regulate anchor-cell invasion; fos-1, hlh-2, nhr-67, and egl-43. The Matus Lab at Stony Brook University sought to answer the question of how all … Continue reading Anchor-Cell Invasion Regulation Network Discovered

Inactivated Gene Linked to Kidney Cancer and Tumor Development in Mice

Gaurav Sharma ’22 The epigenetic components pertaining to the onset of cancer have been of interest for many years due to the hope of developing approaches to delay the onset of cancer in the future for an individual. Recently, a tumor suppressor family has been discovered, called Ras-Association Domain Family (RASSF) which epigenetically inactivated breast, lung, skin, and thyroid cancers. Neither RASSF10’s in-vivo function nor … Continue reading Inactivated Gene Linked to Kidney Cancer and Tumor Development in Mice

The Disappearance of the Y Chromosome (And Other Chromosomes)

Wendy Wu ’22 The Y-chromosome is quite unlike its homologue, the X-chromosome. With a relatively lacking number of genes, the Y-chromosome is the only chromosome inessential for life; its major function is to determine the sex of offspring. How did this come to be the case? A part of the reason is that the Y-chromosome does not occur as a pair; it does not have … Continue reading The Disappearance of the Y Chromosome (And Other Chromosomes)

Genetic factors may be involved in disease risk of early-onset autoimmune thyroid disease

Panayiota Siskos ’23 Autoimmune thyroid diseases, such as Graves’ disease and Hashimoto’s disease, are often characterized by the infiltration of T cells and B cells in the thyroid as well as the production of antibodies specific to thyroid antigens. Genes including human leukocyte antigen (HLA), cytotoxic T lymphocyte-associated factor 4 (CTLA-4), CD40, and protein tyrosine phosphatase-22 (PTPN-22) have been previously associated with susceptibility to autoimmune … Continue reading Genetic factors may be involved in disease risk of early-onset autoimmune thyroid disease

Different Types of Anesthesia can Impact Breast Cancer Metastasis.

Priyanshi Patel ‘22 Metastasis refers to the surgical removal of solid tumors and metastasis is the main cause of cancer death. Previously, not much was known about the role anesthetics play in cancer metastasis. Complete surgical removal of solid tumors offers the possibility of a cure and is the basic treatment provided. Despite surgery, recurrent metastasis in vital organs does reoccur and is a major … Continue reading Different Types of Anesthesia can Impact Breast Cancer Metastasis.