Discovery of Mass Tyrannosaurus rex Fossil Sites Indicates Social Interaction Rather Than Isolation

Sooraj Shah ’24 The image of the lone Tyrannosaurus rex fossils sitting in a museum is based on the stereotype that they hunted in solidarity. It has long been debated whether these creatures even had the brain capacity to form communities until recently. A study conducted by Alan Titus, a paleontologist for the U.S. Bureau of Land Management, focused on a new mass grave whose … Continue reading Discovery of Mass Tyrannosaurus rex Fossil Sites Indicates Social Interaction Rather Than Isolation

Brain Imaging May Prevent Obesity and Linked Psychological Behaviors

Sooraj Shah ’24 Obesity rates in the United States, approaching almost 70% for men and 62% for women, are concerning, especially since obesity is associated with several other conditions such as heart attacks and diabetes. While the classic solution is exercise and proper diet maintenance, the ability to predict and prevent obesity has become a topic of research. A study led by Dr. Anat Biegon, … Continue reading Brain Imaging May Prevent Obesity and Linked Psychological Behaviors

Discovery of Plant Fossils Beneath Greenland Ice Sheet Hints at Danger from Global Warming

Sooraj Shah ’24 The devastating impact of global warming on the human race is a frightening possibility, which may be more imminent than expected. Recent evidence suggests that the rising atmospheric carbon dioxide levels are not the only factor to blame, but that the surface of Earth itself may also be a contributing factor. A study conducted by Dr. Andrew Christ, professor in the department … Continue reading Discovery of Plant Fossils Beneath Greenland Ice Sheet Hints at Danger from Global Warming

Lightning Strikes May Have Been a Key Ingredient in the Creation of Life on Earth

Sooraj Shah ’24 It has been long believed that the requirements for life on Earth were set into motion solely by a plethora of meteorites, which contained vital minerals for the foundation of living organisms. While this is true, recent evidence suggests that lightning may have played just as large of a role. A study conducted by Benjamin Hess, a PhD student at Yale University, … Continue reading Lightning Strikes May Have Been a Key Ingredient in the Creation of Life on Earth

Evolution of avian brain sizes: The uncovered connection with body size

Sooraj Shah ’24 It is a common belief that the cumulative size of an individual’s fists taken together results in an approximate size of that individual’s brain. By this interpretation, individuals with larger hand sizes should thus have bigger brains. On the contrary, towards the end of the Cretaceous era, the relative brain size of both small avians (birds) and massive non-avians (dinosaurs) were the … Continue reading Evolution of avian brain sizes: The uncovered connection with body size

A Once Thought Extinct Species of Mice Repopulates after an Explosion

Sabah Bari ’24 Mount Pinatubo was known for being a quiet volcano located on the most populated Island of Luzon in the Philippines. However, the calmness of Mount Pinatubo came to a halt on June 15, 1991 when the volcano erupted. The destruction of the explosive volcano negatively affected the wildlife on Luzon, except two main species of the Philippine forest mice. Upon the eruption, … Continue reading A Once Thought Extinct Species of Mice Repopulates after an Explosion

X-ray diffraction provides new gateway to analyze mummies

Sooraj Shah ’24 Since the 20th century discovery of the tomb of King Tutankamun, the excitement around discovering mummies has been a topic of controversy, particularly regarding how the mummies are handled once they are discovered. Unwrapping and disrupting the mummies’ final resting place is considered to be invasive. A study by Dr. Stuart Stock, a professor within the cell and molecular biology department at … Continue reading X-ray diffraction provides new gateway to analyze mummies