The Role of Gene Expression Variation in the Development of Mammalian Drug Resistance

Simran Kaur ‘20 Designing drugs is often challenging because identical cells within a specific network will exhibit varying genetic expression (noise), resulting in drug resistance. The source of this variation is most often stochastic, accumulations of random fluctuations occurring during transcription, translation, and post-translational regulation. Gene expression noise currently poses as the greatest barrier in finding a cure for cancer and Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV). … Continue reading The Role of Gene Expression Variation in the Development of Mammalian Drug Resistance

Chloroquine as a Promising Anti-Viral Drug in Immunocompromised Patients Amidst the COVID-19 Pandemic

Simran Kaur ‘20 SARS-CoV-2, a new type of coronavirus, is responsible for a global pandemic that currently has infected hundreds of thousands of individuals worldwide. The virus belongs to the same family of viruses responsible for certain cases of the common cold, Middle East Respiratory Syndrome, and Sudden Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS). The virus is incredibly contagious, spreading through respiratory droplets and exploiting commonly-found human … Continue reading Chloroquine as a Promising Anti-Viral Drug in Immunocompromised Patients Amidst the COVID-19 Pandemic

Different Types of Anesthesia can Impact Breast Cancer Metastasis.

Priyanshi Patel ‘22 Metastasis refers to the surgical removal of solid tumors and metastasis is the main cause of cancer death. Previously, not much was known about the role anesthetics play in cancer metastasis. Complete surgical removal of solid tumors offers the possibility of a cure and is the basic treatment provided. Despite surgery, recurrent metastasis in vital organs does reoccur and is a major … Continue reading Different Types of Anesthesia can Impact Breast Cancer Metastasis.

CRISPR-Edited Stem Cells as a Potential Therapeutic Target for Cancer in Immunocompromised Individuals

Simran Kaur ‘20 CRISPR-Cas9 technology has been used to edit the mammalian genome for decades, allowing scientists to remove, add, and change sections of DNA sequences. The human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) does not have a cure that exists, but studies have shown that allogeneic transplantation of STEM cells into diagnosed patients can eradicate the virus. CCR5 is the coreceptor for the entry of HIV into … Continue reading CRISPR-Edited Stem Cells as a Potential Therapeutic Target for Cancer in Immunocompromised Individuals

Study Reveals Ability of Human Cartilage to Regenerate

Mariam Malik ‘22 Cartilage is malleable soft tissue meant to prevent excess friction from joints rubbing against one another. Located in numerous parts of the body, such as the larynx, respiratory tract, and the septum, human cartilage is the most malleable and widespread at birth, eventually being replaced by bone. For a long time, scientists believed that cartilage in joints could not be regrown; however, … Continue reading Study Reveals Ability of Human Cartilage to Regenerate

Cannabis as a Beneficial Alternative for Frequent Opioid Users with Chronic Pain

Priyanshi Patel ’22 The number of opioid-related deaths has continued to rise in  the United States and Canada. In regions where drug overdoses were declared a public health emergency, synthetic opioids in drug markets had caused large increases in death. Many people who use drugs lack access to adequate pain management through their healthcare system, thereby experiencing high rates of pain. More research is needed … Continue reading Cannabis as a Beneficial Alternative for Frequent Opioid Users with Chronic Pain

Can a Reduction in Carbohydrate Consumption Produce Adverse Effects?

Jorge Pincay ’20 Low carbohydrate  diets (LCD) have been adopted by many patients as a means of battling diseases such as cancer, diabetes, obesity, and many other metabolic disorders. This type of diet is even widely used by the general population for maintaining and/or losing weight. However, not many studies  have investigated the adverse health effects that may result from a sudden halt in carbohydrates … Continue reading Can a Reduction in Carbohydrate Consumption Produce Adverse Effects?

Potential for Enhanced Cancer Therapy by Allosteric Inhibition of Phosphoglycerate Mutase

Jorge Pincay ’20 Phosphoglycerate mutase 1 (PGAM1) is a gene known to promote rapid tumor growth and invasiveness in several cancers, including non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). PGAM1 encodes for an enzyme that catalyzes the conversion of 3-phosphoglycerate to 2-phosphoglycerate in the glycolytic pathway,  a compound that coordinates anabolic biosynthesis. In many forms of cancer, including NSCLC, urothelial bladder cancer, and hepatocellular carcinoma, upregulation of … Continue reading Potential for Enhanced Cancer Therapy by Allosteric Inhibition of Phosphoglycerate Mutase

Common Fungi May Drive Pancreatic Cancer

Nicole Zhao ’20 Pancreatic cancer is the seventh leading cause of cancer-related deaths worldwide and occurs more frequently in developed countries (1). What makes pancreatic cancer even more alarming is that patients seldom exhibit symptoms until an advanced stage of the disease when little can be done for them (1). Therefore, techniques in early detection and risk assessment are crucial in the prognosis of a … Continue reading Common Fungi May Drive Pancreatic Cancer

A Long-Term Solution for Individuals Living With Peanut Allergies

Aditi Kaveti ’23 Peanut allergies affect 6% to 8% of children around the world. Living with severe allergies is extremely dangerous and requires close monitoring of the ingredients in packaged foods and at restaurants. Many packaged products warn that the food was manufactured in a facility that processes peanuts or tree nuts. These trace amounts seem inconsequential, but they can lead to severe allergic reactions. … Continue reading A Long-Term Solution for Individuals Living With Peanut Allergies

Enhanced mRNA Gene Therapy for Critical Limb Ischemia

Jorge Pincay ‘20 Critical limb ischemia (CLI) is a cardiovascular condition characterized by severely narrowed arteries resulting from the buildup of plaque. This narrowing of the arteries  significantly reduces blood flow to the hands, feet, and legs and may lead to amputation of the affected limbs. Most patients suffering from CLI need to undergo some form of a revascularization procedure in order to combat this … Continue reading Enhanced mRNA Gene Therapy for Critical Limb Ischemia

The Effect of Follistatin on the Browning of Fatty Tissue in Obese Mice

Kavindra Sahabir ‘21 A major myth in health and fitness circles is that all fat and fatty tissue is “bad” and contributes to obesity. While it is true that fatty tissues such as white adipose tissue play a major role in the development of obesity, diabetes, and related diseases, brown adipose tissue, another type of fatty tissue, can actually stimulate a decrease in body weight … Continue reading The Effect of Follistatin on the Browning of Fatty Tissue in Obese Mice