The Usage of Electromagnetic Waves as Water Sanitizers as Opposed to Traditional Methods of Water Sanitation

Kavindra Sahabir ‘21 One of the biggest challenges for animal breeding on farms is assuring the highest quality of the drinking water afforded to said animals. The goal is to prevent contamination from pathogens in order to ensure optimal animal health, and lower the risk disease. Currently, the system that most farms use is a physical method of filtration along with different chemical treatments. However, … Continue reading The Usage of Electromagnetic Waves as Water Sanitizers as Opposed to Traditional Methods of Water Sanitation

Solar Cells Could Power Medical Implants

  By Rideeta Raquib ‘19 Electronic implants are usually powered by batteries. Rechargeable batteries, which are rare, require continuous charging and primary batteries require implant replacements if they are completely used up. Thus, lead researcher Dr. Lukas Bereuter, and his research team at the University of Bern in Switzerland investigated whether sunlight could serve as an alternative source of energy to power medical implants.   Models … Continue reading Solar Cells Could Power Medical Implants

Improved Batteries in the Human Body

by Michael D’Agati   The field of bioelectronics, which produces implantable devices for sensing and therapeutics, has recently become a popular field. There is high promise in the collaboration between biology and electronics, but in order for these new innovations to work, a power source, such as implantable batteries, must be present to supply the energy needed. Currently, implantable batteries require bulky metal cases to keep … Continue reading Improved Batteries in the Human Body

The Exploration of Stone Tools

by Lillian Pao (’18) Stone tools have been around for millions of years. It is a technology that has evolved with the hominin phenotype. About three million years ago, flake-making was mastered by the African hominins, followed by handaxes 1.75 million years ago, and custom complex stone reductions by 1.6 million years ago.  Professor Mark W. Moore from the University of New England and a … Continue reading The Exploration of Stone Tools

The Many Advantages of Almonds

by Julia Newman (’19) Oilseeds are incredibly valuable in our society because they are applicable to a wide array of industries. Currently, soybeans, sunflowers, and rapeseeds are the most commonly used plants for their oils due to their high nutritional value, ability to reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease, and large quantity of oil extracted per plant. However, it was recently discovered by Dr. Sorkheh … Continue reading The Many Advantages of Almonds

Bio-Diesel Enhances the Flow of Emulsions in Pipelines

by Jenna Mallon (’18) Emulsions, mixtures containing two immiscible liquids, are used in a variety of industries including food, paint, pharmaceutical, cosmetic, and oil/gas. Emulsions play a large role in petroleum production since they exist at every stage of production, from crude oil to the refined petroleum. Issues arise when it comes to the transport of petroleum: the emulsions in the petroleum may contain solids … Continue reading Bio-Diesel Enhances the Flow of Emulsions in Pipelines

Application of Psychology in Emails Could Lead to More Effective Communication

By Lee Ann Santore ’19 In this age of technology, email is employed as a fundamental form of communication capable of creating and strengthening both casual and professional relationships. Researchers from the USC Viterbi School of Engineering, having studied 16 billion emails sent by 2 million users, were able to identify several key patterns. The results revealed that most emails are responded to within an hour, … Continue reading Application of Psychology in Emails Could Lead to More Effective Communication

Computers Can Learn Like Humans

By Cerise Carey ’16 Scientists have created an algorithm that allows computers to recognize and draw simple visual concepts, such as handwritten characters. A research group under the guidance of Dr. Brenden Lake, a Moore-Sloan Data Science Fellow at New York University, devised an algorithm that serves to shorten the time it takes for computers to “learn” new concepts and replicate types of pattern recognition … Continue reading Computers Can Learn Like Humans

Determining the Sex of a Fingerprint

By Shannon Bohman ’19 An new innovative test may help determine whether a fingerprint comes from a man or a woman. Certain amino acids are twice as prevalent in women than in men, meaning that testing for amino acid concentration found in fingerprints can determine the gender of the person they belong to. For more than a century, fingerprints have been analyzed as if they … Continue reading Determining the Sex of a Fingerprint

Optimization of a Lithium Flow Battery to Increase Energy Storage

By Meghan Bialt-DeCelie Image acquired from: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wind_power_in_New_Zealand Figure 3: Windmills need reliable large-scale flow batteries to effectively store energy for later use.   The flow battery is a development in large-scale, renewable battery technology. It is often found attached to solar panels and windmills to collect the energy produced. However, it is unable to cost-effectively store large amounts of energy. Dr. Qing Wang, of the University … Continue reading Optimization of a Lithium Flow Battery to Increase Energy Storage