A New Model for Group Decision-Making

By Anna Tarasova ’19 Making a decision in a group requires integrating individual and group beliefs. It has been previously demonstrated that one is more likely to assign greater credibility to the beliefs of a larger group than to those of a smaller group. Prior researchers have also theorized that the adoption of group beliefs by individuals is driven by a desire to mitigate potential … Continue reading A New Model for Group Decision-Making

Caption: Imagining oneself in another person’s shoes helps lead to a better emotional understanding.

Inferring Perspective Versus Getting Perspective

Ericka Berman Two strategies used to study mental-state inference are theorization, inference through behavior, and simulation, self-projection, but effectiveness varies based on biases in people’s intuitions. Haotian Zhou Ph.D. et al. of Shanghai Tech University predicted the bias in favor of theorization because people assume behavior is reflective of the mind. In the first experiment, twelve “experiencers” viewed emotional pictures. Experiencers reported their feelings ranging … Continue reading Inferring Perspective Versus Getting Perspective

Figure 1: Understanding student-teacher relationships is important in understanding factors affecting learning.

Creating Birds of Similar Feathers: Leveraging Similarity to Improve Teacher-Student Relationships and Academic Achievement

Ericka Berman Having thriving student-teacher relationships (TSR) is important in academic success. In studying the improvement of TSR, schooling, positive youth development, and social motivation are of great interest to researchers. Dr. Hunter Gehlbach and his team of researchers carried out this study using a sample of 315 ninth graders and 25 teachers from a high school in the southwestern United States. Students were assessed … Continue reading Creating Birds of Similar Feathers: Leveraging Similarity to Improve Teacher-Student Relationships and Academic Achievement

Figure 1. Online dating apps, such as Tinder, are becoming increasingly popular and scientists have recently set out to determine the motivation behind using the apps.

Motivations to Use Tinder

By Megan Y. Tan ’19 With at least 10 million active users a day, Tinder is one of the most popular dating apps. It is easy to set up, by connecting it to Facebook, and easy to use, by just swiping left when presented with an undesirable profile, and swiping right when presented with a desirable profile. Although it is such a popular app, not … Continue reading Motivations to Use Tinder

Figure 1. Four-year-old children develop the ability to understand others.

Four-Year-Old Children and Their Ability to Understand Others

By Rideeta Raquib ’19   One of the key components of human cognition is understanding mental states of others and recognize that people around the world may have differing perspectives. This concept, referred to as the theory of mind, plays an important role in human communication and cooperation. Children initially pass false belief tests at the age of three or four years old. These tests … Continue reading Four-Year-Old Children and Their Ability to Understand Others

Figure 1. Ancient Egyptian women were considered equal to Ancient Egyptian men.

History Can Affect Gender Roles

By Megan Y. Tan ’19 Gender role inequality, which has several severe disadvantages and discriminations in a variety of countries, is a highlighted and debated societal issue. For instance, in western societies, women’s salary is 20% lower than males who work in the same field. Social attitudes, economic pressure, and conservative structural forces to maintain the status quo are a couple of reasons for the … Continue reading History Can Affect Gender Roles

Figure 1. Consumers view all-natural products more positively despite no formal definition existing for the term.

The “All-Natural” Marketing Label and its Effect on Consumers

By Megan Tan ’19 The “All-Natural” label is extensively used to market consumer products. However, this label is not regulated or defined by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) since it is deemed a marketing label to influence consumers’ purchases. As such, little research has been done to analyze the effect that that label has on consumers’ perceptions of “all natural” food quality, nutritional content, … Continue reading The “All-Natural” Marketing Label and its Effect on Consumers

Gender Role Congruence and Attractiveness in Online Dating

By Megan Tan ’19 Online dating platforms are becoming more commonly used to meet and start a romantic relationship. A previous study has indicated that more than one-third of marriages in America began online. However, little research has been done on the effect of gender roles and attractiveness in the online dating scenario. Kelsey C. Chappeta and Dr. Joan M. Barth from the Institute for … Continue reading Gender Role Congruence and Attractiveness in Online Dating

The Self-Fulfilling Prophecy of Wishful Thinking

by Amanda Ng (’17) While love for most people is a positive experience, what is often desired above all is to have that love reciprocated. This desire can sometimes be so strong that it can alter perceptions of a platonic encounter to a romantic one. These perceptions can cause individuals to exhibit more romantic behaviors, such as flirting or physical affection, that can change their … Continue reading The Self-Fulfilling Prophecy of Wishful Thinking

Romanticism May Increase Rates of Partner Violence

by Amanda Ng (’17) In terms of their romantic beliefs, people are under a variety of influences, some of which stem from the entertainment industry. Many books, movies, and television shows showing jealous and controlling behaviors as signs of love and commitment in heterosexual relationships have inspired a similar belief in young women. Previous studies have shown that these romantic beliefs can endanger one’s well-being … Continue reading Romanticism May Increase Rates of Partner Violence