The Ketogenic Diet’s Effects on Cancer Patients

Thumyat Noe ’23 Researchers determined that diet plays a crucial role in increasing or decreasing the risk of cancer. For instance, previous studies show that high levels of insulin and glucose in the blood can increase the risk of colorectal cancer. Therefore, cancer researchers are interested in developing diets that can improve the well-being and prognosis of cancer patients. A ketogenic diet, which consists of … Continue reading The Ketogenic Diet’s Effects on Cancer Patients

Similar but Different: The Potential Role of Spatial Differentiation in Memory Retrieval

Robyn Rutgers ’24 Researchers have long been interested in establishing how the brain remembers spatial environments and avoids confusion in similar environments, such as in a new supermarket. A recent study from University of Arizona researchers investigates how the processes of spatial memory retrieval are implemented in the brain and how the brain differentiates memory representations that involve overlapping features. The study recruited 27 participants … Continue reading Similar but Different: The Potential Role of Spatial Differentiation in Memory Retrieval

Improving Cognitive Functions in World Trade Center Responders

Thumyat Noe ’23 Individuals who responded to the World Trade Center attacks on September 11th, 2001 experienced a great deal of trauma and distress. Researchers from Stony Brook University who study well-being and cognitive abilities discovered that these responders are at an elevated relative risk of developing aging-related cognitive impairment. In particular, lower cognitive function is correlated with higher levels of exposure to trauma in … Continue reading Improving Cognitive Functions in World Trade Center Responders

Inhibition of Sterylglucosidase May Lead to Improved Class of Antifungal Agents

Robyn Rutgers ’24 Upon entering the lungs, the fungal pathogen Cryptococcus neoformans (CN) disseminates through the bloodstream and can cause life-threatening meningitis in immunocompromised patients. Currently, there are a number of major drawbacks in current antifungal agents such as high toxicity, limited availability, and a narrow spectrum of activity. Therefore, the development of new pharmacological agents is critical in combating fungal pathogens such as CN. … Continue reading Inhibition of Sterylglucosidase May Lead to Improved Class of Antifungal Agents

The Effect of Electrotherapy on Brains Addicted to Video Games

Ishmam Khan ’25 Although video games may represent a sanctuary from the stresses of daily living, young people, especially teens, are susceptible to becoming addicted to gaming platforms. According to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Internet Gaming Disorder (IGD) results in an irresistible compulsion to play video games, which may lead to declining mental health and daily function. Currently, one common technique … Continue reading The Effect of Electrotherapy on Brains Addicted to Video Games

Exosomes: A Surprising Key to Spinal Injury Recovery

Alex Moir ’23 Exosomes, which carry biomolecular cargo around the body, are a group of vesicles secreted by almost all human cells. Exosomal delivery is also cell-specific, as the outer membrane surface of exosomes contains molecules that only bind with target recipient cell membranes. Recent research has suggested exosomes may play a role in wound healing and cell repair at sites of tissue damage, positioning … Continue reading Exosomes: A Surprising Key to Spinal Injury Recovery

Recalling Common Ground Depends on the Mode of Communication

Aditi Kaveti ’23 Communication between conversation partners can be performed in a multitude of ways, including spatial, visual, linguistic, aural, and gestural. These different modalities can affect the way information is transferred and interpreted, as well as the way the information is later recalled and referenced. Above all, communication between partners establishes a common ground between the two as they create a shared experience. Dr. … Continue reading Recalling Common Ground Depends on the Mode of Communication

Does Ethnicity Influence Memory Recall in Social Settings?

Daphne Siozios ’23 Collaborative learning occurs when a group of individuals works together to remember shared information and events. Not much is known about how the collaborative learning process and a social setting aids memory formation, analysis, and recollection since past research in the field has mainly focused on studying individuals in isolation. Professor Suparna Rajaram at Stony Brook University works to examine the effect … Continue reading Does Ethnicity Influence Memory Recall in Social Settings?

Optimizing Movement-Based Behavior Networks in Artificial Intelligence

Ishmam Khan ’25 Deep learning involves the use of machinery to simulate biological phenomena, especially human behavior. Researchers have developed two systems of programming that proved useful in mimicking movements: convolutional neural networks (CNNs), which are based on virtual imagery and spatial information, and recurrent neural networks (RNNs), which adapt long-short term memory (LSTM) to model long term contextual information of temporal sequences.  When used … Continue reading Optimizing Movement-Based Behavior Networks in Artificial Intelligence

Elastin-like, Polypeptide-Based Bio-Ink: The Future of Bioprinting

Daphne Siozios ’23 3-D bioprinting is a novel field that continues to pave the way in establishing alternative forms of medicine to otherwise traditional techniques of tissue remodeling. Bio-ink, the material used to produce artificial live tissue through three-dimensional means, must meet certain requirements in resolution, shape, and biocompatibility (the material must not cause an adverse response in the host organism). While certain biomaterials used … Continue reading Elastin-like, Polypeptide-Based Bio-Ink: The Future of Bioprinting

Electrical Impulses May Be The Best Way to Treat Mental Illnesses

Aditi Kaveti ’23 Mental illnesses span a wide range of health conditions, including disorders that affect one’s mood, thinking, and behavior. Some severe cases of these conditions may be medication-resistant. For example, some patients with epilepsy are known to have significant anxiety associated with the condition that cannot be treated with medication. A study recently published in Nature Biomedical Engineering addresses medication-resistant disorders by studying … Continue reading Electrical Impulses May Be The Best Way to Treat Mental Illnesses

Freshwater Pond on Southampton Island Contains Traces of the Extinct Sadlermiut People

Joyce Chen ’23 The Sadlermiut were a past civilization that lived on Southampton Island in Nunavut, Canada. Accustomed to the harsh weather of Arctic Canada, the Sadlermiut were natural hunter-gatherers and fishermen. Recovery of past artifacts and skeletal remains suggested that the civilization occupied regions of Southampton Island ranging back to 1250 CE up until 1903, when they were wiped out by a pandemic introduced … Continue reading Freshwater Pond on Southampton Island Contains Traces of the Extinct Sadlermiut People