How the Mental Health of College Students in China has been Affected by COVID-19

Yukta Kulkarni ’22 The COVID-19 pandemic has taken over the world in a way that disrupts almost everyone’s previous way of life. People can no longer leave their house without wearing a mask, socialize within 6 feet of friends and family, or go to work/school. These inconveniences are minor, though, compared to those that people diagnosed with, or know someone with, COVID-19 experience. This can … Continue reading How the Mental Health of College Students in China has been Affected by COVID-19

Fears and How Priming Can Help Overcome Them

Yukta Kulkarni ’22 Some of the most important topics covered by neuroscience research encompass memory retention. This type of research helps explain how much information brains can retain and how easily it is learned. However, does prior learning affect the ability to learn in the future? To answer this, Cole et al. blocked protein-kinase A (PKA) and extracellular signal-related mitogen-activated protein-kinase (ERK/MAPK) within the basolateral … Continue reading Fears and How Priming Can Help Overcome Them

Announcing the SBYIR Research Symposium!

Attention all undergraduate students! If you have participated or are currently participating in faculty-mentored research, we at the Stony Brook Young Investigators Review understand that it has been difficult for you to participate in conferences and showcase your work. To give you an outlet by which you can not only present your research, but also gain insightful feedback from faculty on your work and presentation, … Continue reading Announcing the SBYIR Research Symposium!

Child anxiety disorders and symptoms closely associated with specific maternal anxiety disorders

Priyanshi Patel ’22 Social anxiety disorder (SAD) is one of the most prevalent and disabling anxiety disorders with an onset age of 13 years. SAD is a chronic disorder with adverse psychiatric, social, and educational outcomes, which is why it is important to prevent it by understanding its risk factors. One known risk factor is behavioral inhibition (BI), the withdrawal from unfamiliar situations, environments, and … Continue reading Child anxiety disorders and symptoms closely associated with specific maternal anxiety disorders

World Trade Center first responders with PTSD and cognitive impairment at high-risk for developing dementia

Priyanshi Patel ’22 According to two studies presented by Stony Brook University at the Alzheimer’s Association International Conference, World Trade Center (WTC) first responders with signs of cognitive impairment (CI) exhibited neurological abnormalities and anomalies in their blood, which are normally attributed to Alzheimer’s disease patients. The first study investigated MRI results of WTC responders that showed significant gray matter atrophy compared to individuals of … Continue reading World Trade Center first responders with PTSD and cognitive impairment at high-risk for developing dementia

Effects of distractive and target stimuli on auditory neurons within mice brains

Joyce Chen ’23 Biological organisms are naturally stimulated by their environment. To avoid being overstimulated, animals use selective attention. By simply focusing on one thing, humans and other animals can essentially drown out other irrelevant stimuli. This phenomenon requires sensory regulation, especially auditory. To gain insight on how auditory neurons react to both irrelevant and target stimuli, Stony Brook University researcher Pan-tong Yao and his … Continue reading Effects of distractive and target stimuli on auditory neurons within mice brains

Can video games enhance auditory processing? New research dives deeper into the effects of video gaming on visual and auditory cognitive functions.

Joyce Chen ’23 Within the past few decades, video games have become one of the most universally treasured forms of entertainment among players of all ages. Amongst various genres, action games are widely popularized across the United States. Despite the notable effects that video games have on visual processing, there is a lack of evidence regarding the effect of video games on auditory function. Researcher … Continue reading Can video games enhance auditory processing? New research dives deeper into the effects of video gaming on visual and auditory cognitive functions.

Expectation-induced modulation of metastable activity underlies faster coding of sensory stimuli

Sabah Bari ’24 Expectation is what drives the human brain to perceive our senses. Perception is connected to sensory processing, and the recognition of the stimuli is what determines how accurately and how fast individuals are able to understand it. In the gustatory cortex, the pre-stimulus activity is the anticipation of a specific taste before even consuming a food. The anticipation is a trigger to … Continue reading Expectation-induced modulation of metastable activity underlies faster coding of sensory stimuli

Diagnosis and management of Guillain–Barré syndrome in ten steps

Sabah Bari ’24 Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS) is a rare autoimmune disease characterized by an overactive immune system that causes damage to peripheral nerves, leading to loss of sensorimotor function starting at the extremities and spreading to the torso. Some symptoms of GBS are potentially fatal, such as respiratory failure, cardiac arrhythmias, blood pressure instability, which are all directly involved with the autonomic nervous system. The … Continue reading Diagnosis and management of Guillain–Barré syndrome in ten steps

Ageing: The Role of Ageism

Thumyat Noe ’23 Although the global average life expectancy has increased, there is little evidence to support that quality of life for older people has improved. Older adults are believed to be experiencing better health worldwide due to improvements in medical, psychological, and social resources, but the role of ageism in determining healthy aging is often disregarded. Ageism is a form of prejudice in which … Continue reading Ageing: The Role of Ageism

Melittin: A Natural Peptide from Bee Venom Which Induces Apoptosis in Human Leukemia Cells

Thumyat Noe ’23 Past research has shown that honeybee’s venom has the potential to treat various diseases such as arthritis, chronic pain, cancer, and atopic dermatitis. The venom mostly consists of peptides and low molecular weight compounds such as sugars and amino acids. Melittin is one of the peptides found within honeybee’s venom and possesses the most bioactive properties among all the compounds in the … Continue reading Melittin: A Natural Peptide from Bee Venom Which Induces Apoptosis in Human Leukemia Cells

The Impact of Pubertal Development on Anxiety Risk and Startle Habituation

Aditi Kaveti ‘23 As children begin pubertal development, they experience a host of changes that may contribute to feelings of anxiety, including increases in weight and height, changes in body shape, and hormonal fluctuations. In a study done in part by Felicia Jackson of the Department of Psychology at Stony Brook University, researchers examined the relationship between mean startle, startle habituation, pubertal development, behavioral inhibition … Continue reading The Impact of Pubertal Development on Anxiety Risk and Startle Habituation