Breast Cancer Metastasis Hypothesized to be Affected by Type of Administered Anesthesia

Simran Kaur ‘20 Complete surgical resection of breast tissue, known as a mastectomy, is often suggested as the first-line treatment in patients diagnosed with breast cancer. Metastasis, the spread of cancer cells to other parts of the body, is a frequent occurrence after surgery and is the primary cause of cancer-related deaths. It was hypothesized by the researchers in this study that the type of … Continue reading Breast Cancer Metastasis Hypothesized to be Affected by Type of Administered Anesthesia

Nanoparticles May Be the New Future for Cancer Immunotherapy

Gaurav Sharma ’22 Cancer immunotherapy has been extensively explored and requires information of the tumor’s antigen presentation in order for a method to be selected. An approach that is more effective and has a broader range had not been found that did not have the constraint of needing the information of the tumor’s antigen presentation. Researchers at Johns Hopkins School of Medicine and Johns Hopkins … Continue reading Nanoparticles May Be the New Future for Cancer Immunotherapy

The Role of Gene Expression Variation in the Development of Mammalian Drug Resistance

Simran Kaur ‘20 Designing drugs is often challenging because identical cells within a specific network will exhibit varying genetic expression (noise), resulting in drug resistance. The source of this variation is most often stochastic, accumulations of random fluctuations occurring during transcription, translation, and post-translational regulation. Gene expression noise currently poses as the greatest barrier in finding a cure for cancer and Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV). … Continue reading The Role of Gene Expression Variation in the Development of Mammalian Drug Resistance

Inactivated Gene Linked to Kidney Cancer and Tumor Development in Mice

Gaurav Sharma ’22 The epigenetic components pertaining to the onset of cancer have been of interest for many years due to the hope of developing approaches to delay the onset of cancer in the future for an individual. Recently, a tumor suppressor family has been discovered, called Ras-Association Domain Family (RASSF) which epigenetically inactivated breast, lung, skin, and thyroid cancers. Neither RASSF10’s in-vivo function nor … Continue reading Inactivated Gene Linked to Kidney Cancer and Tumor Development in Mice

Application of Trispecific Antibodies to Anticancer Immunotherapy

Ashley Goland ’23 Immunotherapy is a form of cancer treatment that utilizes the body’s own immune system to destroy cancerous tumors and has shown promise in past animal and clinical human trials. For all of its dazzling successes to date, however, immunotherapy is not completely effective for treating the full range of cancer types and patients— yet. Scientists working in Sanofi Research and Development believe … Continue reading Application of Trispecific Antibodies to Anticancer Immunotherapy

Different Types of Anesthesia can Impact Breast Cancer Metastasis.

Priyanshi Patel ‘22 Metastasis refers to the surgical removal of solid tumors and metastasis is the main cause of cancer death. Previously, not much was known about the role anesthetics play in cancer metastasis. Complete surgical removal of solid tumors offers the possibility of a cure and is the basic treatment provided. Despite surgery, recurrent metastasis in vital organs does reoccur and is a major … Continue reading Different Types of Anesthesia can Impact Breast Cancer Metastasis.

Disturbances in Circadian Clock Linked to Increased Susceptibility of Brain Tumors

Simran Kaur ‘20 All living organisms have circadian rhythms, an approximately twenty-four cycle that ensures the appropriate timing of important physiological functions such as digestion and sleep. Glioblastoma stem cells (GSCs) that are involved in the formation of aggressive brain tumors are stimulated by altered circadian clocks. Clock genes are responsible for the oscillation of gene expression within the day and can behave as both … Continue reading Disturbances in Circadian Clock Linked to Increased Susceptibility of Brain Tumors

CRISPR-Edited Stem Cells as a Potential Therapeutic Target for Cancer in Immunocompromised Individuals

Simran Kaur ‘20 CRISPR-Cas9 technology has been used to edit the mammalian genome for decades, allowing scientists to remove, add, and change sections of DNA sequences. The human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) does not have a cure that exists, but studies have shown that allogeneic transplantation of STEM cells into diagnosed patients can eradicate the virus. CCR5 is the coreceptor for the entry of HIV into … Continue reading CRISPR-Edited Stem Cells as a Potential Therapeutic Target for Cancer in Immunocompromised Individuals

Potential for Enhanced Cancer Therapy by Allosteric Inhibition of Phosphoglycerate Mutase

Jorge Pincay ’20 Phosphoglycerate mutase 1 (PGAM1) is a gene known to promote rapid tumor growth and invasiveness in several cancers, including non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). PGAM1 encodes for an enzyme that catalyzes the conversion of 3-phosphoglycerate to 2-phosphoglycerate in the glycolytic pathway,  a compound that coordinates anabolic biosynthesis. In many forms of cancer, including NSCLC, urothelial bladder cancer, and hepatocellular carcinoma, upregulation of … Continue reading Potential for Enhanced Cancer Therapy by Allosteric Inhibition of Phosphoglycerate Mutase

Common Fungi May Drive Pancreatic Cancer

Nicole Zhao ’20 Pancreatic cancer is the seventh leading cause of cancer-related deaths worldwide and occurs more frequently in developed countries (1). What makes pancreatic cancer even more alarming is that patients seldom exhibit symptoms until an advanced stage of the disease when little can be done for them (1). Therefore, techniques in early detection and risk assessment are crucial in the prognosis of a … Continue reading Common Fungi May Drive Pancreatic Cancer