Title: Increased Movement of Cancer Cells in Fluids of High Viscosity Hints at Possible Control Mechanism

By Sooraj Shah, Class of 2024 Figure 1 Observing activity of cancer cells in fluids of increasing viscosity may provide a mode of treatment via limiting this activity  With more than 1.9 million individuals in the US being diagnosed with cancer each year, research revolving around the behavior of cancer cells is an important aspect of the search for better treatments. The study of cancer … Continue reading Title: Increased Movement of Cancer Cells in Fluids of High Viscosity Hints at Possible Control Mechanism

Title: Investigating the Metabolism of Cancer

By Julia Chivu, Class of 2024 Figure 3 Woman ingesting a pill. A new drug has been developed to target the metabolism of cancer. Associate Professor Paul M. Bingham and Research Assistant Professor Zuzana Zachar from Stony Brook University developed a unique class of anticancer drugs–including the first-in-class and FDA-approved drug CPI-613. A first-in-class drug produces new treatment options or outcomes by exploring an unprecedented … Continue reading Title: Investigating the Metabolism of Cancer

A New Treatment Can Reprogram Macrophages to Kill Cancer Cells

Yukta Kulkarni ’22 Cancer is a disease in which there is uncontrollable cell growth in any part of the body. The migration of the cancer cells from the origin to other parts of the body is called metastasis, causing malignant tumors. Cancerous cells can be aided by other cells found in tissues such as tumor-associated macrophages (TAMS) that stimulate tumor growth, prompt metastasis, and promote … Continue reading A New Treatment Can Reprogram Macrophages to Kill Cancer Cells

Onions and Garlic May Help Reduce Stomach Cancer Risk

Zhifei Zeng ’23 Stomach cancer, or gastric cancer, is the fourth leading cause of cancer deaths worldwide, and dietary habits play an important role in the development of this cancer. For example, heavy alcohol consumption or high consumption of salt-preserved foods increases the risk of stomach cancer, while diets rich in fruits or vegetables decrease the risk. However, the specific types of vegetables that are … Continue reading Onions and Garlic May Help Reduce Stomach Cancer Risk

An Enzyme-Activating Protein may be a Switch for Invasive Cancer

Zhifei Zeng ’23 Many breast cancer (BC) patients suffer from complications of metastatic disease. In order to form metastasis, cancer cells must switch from a proliferative to an invasive state and overcome several physical barriers to reach another site. Interestingly, increased invasiveness of the tumor is accompanied by a decrease in its cell proliferation capacity. For breast cancer, some proteins may help this proliferative-to-invasive switch … Continue reading An Enzyme-Activating Protein may be a Switch for Invasive Cancer

The Ketogenic Diet’s Effects on Cancer Patients

Thumyat Noe ’23 Researchers determined that diet plays a crucial role in increasing or decreasing the risk of cancer. For instance, previous studies show that high levels of insulin and glucose in the blood can increase the risk of colorectal cancer. Therefore, cancer researchers are interested in developing diets that can improve the well-being and prognosis of cancer patients. A ketogenic diet, which consists of … Continue reading The Ketogenic Diet’s Effects on Cancer Patients

Glial Cells May Shape Brain Tumor Microenvironments

Alex Moir ’23 Glial cells, located in the central nervous system (CNS), support neurons by clearing extracellular waste and mounting an immune response against potential pathogens. Glioma are tumors occurring in the CNS that originate from these glial cells. As glioma tumors progress and become more aggressive, they invade surrounding tissue and develop a hospitable tumor microenvironment (TME). Two types of resident CNS immune cells, … Continue reading Glial Cells May Shape Brain Tumor Microenvironments

Using Modified Guide Strands to Broaden Therapeutic Use of miRNAs for Breast Cancer

Ishmam Khan ’25 Triple-negative breast cancers (TNBCs) are a type of breast cancer that does not respond to traditional hormonal therapy. Despite TNBCs encompassing 10-20% of all breast cancers, TNBCs are significantly more aggressive than other breast cancers and have worse overall survival rates.  These cancers often offer patients a poor prognosis due to their high rates of proliferation and chemoresistance. A research group at … Continue reading Using Modified Guide Strands to Broaden Therapeutic Use of miRNAs for Breast Cancer

Breast Cancer Metastasis Hypothesized to be Affected by Type of Administered Anesthesia

Simran Kaur ‘20 Complete surgical resection of breast tissue, known as a mastectomy, is often suggested as the first-line treatment in patients diagnosed with breast cancer. Metastasis, the spread of cancer cells to other parts of the body, is a frequent occurrence after surgery and is the primary cause of cancer-related deaths. It was hypothesized by the researchers in this study that the type of … Continue reading Breast Cancer Metastasis Hypothesized to be Affected by Type of Administered Anesthesia

Nanoparticles May Be the New Future for Cancer Immunotherapy

Gaurav Sharma ’22 Cancer immunotherapy has been extensively explored and requires information of the tumor’s antigen presentation in order for a method to be selected. An approach that is more effective and has a broader range had not been found that did not have the constraint of needing the information of the tumor’s antigen presentation. Researchers at Johns Hopkins School of Medicine and Johns Hopkins … Continue reading Nanoparticles May Be the New Future for Cancer Immunotherapy

The Role of Gene Expression Variation in the Development of Mammalian Drug Resistance

Simran Kaur ‘20 Designing drugs is often challenging because identical cells within a specific network will exhibit varying genetic expression (noise), resulting in drug resistance. The source of this variation is most often stochastic, accumulations of random fluctuations occurring during transcription, translation, and post-translational regulation. Gene expression noise currently poses as the greatest barrier in finding a cure for cancer and Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV). … Continue reading The Role of Gene Expression Variation in the Development of Mammalian Drug Resistance

Inactivated Gene Linked to Kidney Cancer and Tumor Development in Mice

Gaurav Sharma ’22 The epigenetic components pertaining to the onset of cancer have been of interest for many years due to the hope of developing approaches to delay the onset of cancer in the future for an individual. Recently, a tumor suppressor family has been discovered, called Ras-Association Domain Family (RASSF) which epigenetically inactivated breast, lung, skin, and thyroid cancers. Neither RASSF10’s in-vivo function nor … Continue reading Inactivated Gene Linked to Kidney Cancer and Tumor Development in Mice