Title: EEG Analysis Reveals Association Between Parkinson’s Disease with Visual Hallucinations and Epileptic Discharges

By: Jessica George, Class of 2024 Figure 1: Psychosis in Parkinson’s Disease (PD) is characterized by visual hallucinations (VHs). Psychosis in Parkinson’s Disease (PD) is characterized by visual hallucinations (VHs). These VHs have a significant impact on patient’s lives and serve as a reliable predictor for future nursing home institutionalization. Several disorders such as Charles Bonnet syndrome and temporal lobe epilepsy have similar features to … Continue reading Title: EEG Analysis Reveals Association Between Parkinson’s Disease with Visual Hallucinations and Epileptic Discharges

Title: Exercise was successfully able to restore brain insulin responsiveness in overweight and obese individuals living a sedentary life.

By: Jessica George, Class of 2024  Figure 1: Exercise is a natural and cost effective option to improving health, unlike certain medications. When the brain is resistant to insulin, the body tends to gain weight and distribute fat unfavorably. Resistance to insulin is one of the main characteristics of disorders such as type 2 diabetes and obesity. Today, it is unknown whether it is possible … Continue reading Title: Exercise was successfully able to restore brain insulin responsiveness in overweight and obese individuals living a sedentary life.

Novel Form of Noninvasive Neurosurgery Selectively Lesions Faulty Neural Circuitry

Vignesh Subramanian ’24 A number of movement disorders and motor neuron diseases, including focal epilepsy, Parkinson’s disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, progressive muscular atrophy, and multiple sclerosis, are recognized as medically intractable or capable of becoming so. Intractable conditions lack known etiologies and have no established courses of treatment, with those in the neurological sphere often characterized by resistance to neural activity-suppressing medications (e.g. muscle relaxants, … Continue reading Novel Form of Noninvasive Neurosurgery Selectively Lesions Faulty Neural Circuitry

Case Study Suggests Possible Link Between Hepatitis B Vaccine and Multiple Sclerosis

Jessica George ’24 Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an immune system disorder in which the myelin sheath surrounding axons degenerates, causing system-wide brain-body disruptions. The cause of MS is unknown, but several triggers have been identified. A case study of a patient who developed MS symptoms a day after being vaccinated with hepatitis B inspired researchers from the Bassett Medical center to explore whether the hepatitis … Continue reading Case Study Suggests Possible Link Between Hepatitis B Vaccine and Multiple Sclerosis

World Trade Center Responders with Cognitive Impairment Found to Have Decreased Cerebellar Cortical Thickness

Jessica George ’24 There is no doubt that the September 11th attack on the World Trade Center (WTC) left devastating effects on the community. WTC-affected individuals, including survivors, first responders, and those involved in the clean up/recovery operation were exposed to a multitude of physical and psychological stressors. Prior neuroimaging studies demonstrate that WTC responders with cognitive impairment experienced connectivity changes in the white matter … Continue reading World Trade Center Responders with Cognitive Impairment Found to Have Decreased Cerebellar Cortical Thickness

Targeted Treatment to the Thalamus Can Have Successful Results in Patients with Traumatic Brain Injuries

Melanie Karniewich ’25 Brain injuries are becoming more common, but there are still a lot of unanswered questions that are asked in the aftermath of a traumatic brain injury (TBI). One issue researchers are trying to resolve is whether a patient will awaken after a TBI, and if so, how long awakening takes. Assistant professors Sima Mofakham (Department of Surgery and the Department of Electrical … Continue reading Targeted Treatment to the Thalamus Can Have Successful Results in Patients with Traumatic Brain Injuries

Neuronal Firing in Thalamus is Key to Restoring Post-TBI Consciousness

Vignesh Subramanian ’24 Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a form of acquired brain disability caused by an external force exerted against the head. The causative trauma is typically severe enough to result in loss of consciousness and the conditions under which consciousness returns remain unclear. Clinical practice uses complex electroencephalography (EEG) activity to predict its return and level, predicated on the assumption that neuronal firing … Continue reading Neuronal Firing in Thalamus is Key to Restoring Post-TBI Consciousness

Selective Striatal Neuron Degeneration in HD Linked to Autophagy Impairment

Vignesh Subramanian ’24 Huntington’s disease (HD) is an inherited neurodegenerative disease that causes the progressive breakdown of neurons over time, resulting in the development of involuntary movements (chorea), psychiatric disorders, and cognitive decline. HD is caused by the dominant mutation of the HTT gene encoding huntingtin, a protein whose normal function is unknown but is linked to projection neuron death in the striatum of the … Continue reading Selective Striatal Neuron Degeneration in HD Linked to Autophagy Impairment

Uncovering the Nuances of Mental Disorders and their Impact on the Brain

Lydia Wang ’26 When referencing common medical conditions, heart disease and high blood pressure are often grouped together, as one usually implies the other. Such groupings—the simultaneous presence of two or more medical conditions—are known as comorbidities. Comorbidities in mental health are common; more than half of individuals with mental disorders have more than one. Their occurrence has been dismissed as coincidence and ignored in … Continue reading Uncovering the Nuances of Mental Disorders and their Impact on the Brain

AI-Assisted Readings May Greatly Improve Fracture Diagnosis

Sooraj Shah ’24 The detection of fractures via radiography is one of the most highly used practices in clinical settings such as the emergency room, urgent care, orthopedic and rheumatology offices. The missed fracture diagnosis rate is between 1-3%, accounting for almost 1,200 of every 100,000 patients. A major cause of missed fractures is erroneous initial readings by residents or non-radiologists, which are only corrected … Continue reading AI-Assisted Readings May Greatly Improve Fracture Diagnosis

Use of Retinoid Therapy May Restore Vision in Blind Adults

Sooraj Shah ’24 Leber congenital amaurosis (LCA) is a family of retinal disorders, which result in severe vision loss from birth. LCA is one of the most common causes of childhood blindness, affecting approximately 2-3 infants for every 100,000 births. Currently, no direct cure for LCA exists, but recent developments in gene replacement therapy have shown promise in partially restoring retinal light-sensing ability with variability … Continue reading Use of Retinoid Therapy May Restore Vision in Blind Adults

Accidental EEG Recording of Dying Patient Offers Tentative Glimpse into Our Final Moments

Jessica George ’24 In our relentless pursuit for knowledge, perhaps one of the most perplexing questions to humankind is what happens when we die. Several individuals who have undergone near-death experiences (NDE) describe their “life flashing before their eyes.” There is also the classical theory of a hypoactive brain during the end stages of life, where the brain ceases all electrical activity. Contrary to this … Continue reading Accidental EEG Recording of Dying Patient Offers Tentative Glimpse into Our Final Moments