Opioid Poisoning Rates on Long Island

Ayesha Azeem ‘23 The United States currently faces a growing opioid poisoning crisis. Opioid use can lead to significant impairment and distress, social problems, chronic relapsing abuse and even early death. According to the National Center for Health Statistics, New York is one of 5 states with the most opioid drug overdoses. Historically, those affected by nonfatal opioid poisoning tend to be white males, aged … Continue reading Opioid Poisoning Rates on Long Island

Chloroquine as a Promising Anti-Viral Drug in Immunocompromised Patients Amidst the COVID-19 Pandemic

Simran Kaur ‘20 SARS-CoV-2, a new type of coronavirus, is responsible for a global pandemic that currently has infected hundreds of thousands of individuals worldwide. The virus belongs to the same family of viruses responsible for certain cases of the common cold, Middle East Respiratory Syndrome, and Sudden Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS). The virus is incredibly contagious, spreading through respiratory droplets and exploiting commonly-found human … Continue reading Chloroquine as a Promising Anti-Viral Drug in Immunocompromised Patients Amidst the COVID-19 Pandemic

Genetic factors may be involved in disease risk of early-onset autoimmune thyroid disease

Panayiota Siskos ’23 Autoimmune thyroid diseases, such as Graves’ disease and Hashimoto’s disease, are often characterized by the infiltration of T cells and B cells in the thyroid as well as the production of antibodies specific to thyroid antigens. Genes including human leukocyte antigen (HLA), cytotoxic T lymphocyte-associated factor 4 (CTLA-4), CD40, and protein tyrosine phosphatase-22 (PTPN-22) have been previously associated with susceptibility to autoimmune … Continue reading Genetic factors may be involved in disease risk of early-onset autoimmune thyroid disease

Comfort Eating and Cortisol Reactivity

Ayesha Azeem ‘23 “Comfort-eating,” or increased food intake, is one of the most common responses to stressful situations. Cortisol is the body’s main stress hormone that regulates metabolism and the immune response to stressful situations. Cortisol reactivity under stress can predict stress-related eating behavior and how it affects the body mass index (BMI). Based on one’s cortisol reactivity to a stressor, a person may be … Continue reading Comfort Eating and Cortisol Reactivity

Dexamethasone as a Possible Treatment for Patients Diagnosed with Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome

Simran Kaur ‘20 Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is characterized by the build-up of fluid in the alveoli of the lungs, the main sites of gaseous exchange, causing a lack of oxygen in the body. ARDS is caused by sudden trauma to the lungs, and there currently is no pharmacological treatment for the condition. Researchers in the study sought to determine the efficacy of dexamethasone, … Continue reading Dexamethasone as a Possible Treatment for Patients Diagnosed with Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome

The Relationship Between Dopamine and Development of Asthma

Aditi Kaveti ‘23 Asthma is a chronic condition in the United States that affects more than 26 million people, including an estimated 6 million children. Asthma is described as an intermittent inflammation and narrowing of the airways in the lungs, wheezing, chest tightness, shortness of breath, and coughing. Inflammation is regulated by the nervous system which is regulated by the immune system. Harvard researcher Xingbin … Continue reading The Relationship Between Dopamine and Development of Asthma

The Role of A Recently Discovered Protein in Obesity

Ellie Teng ‘21 Progesterone receptor membrane component 2 (PGRMC2) is a signaling protein found in various parts of the body including the uterus and liver. While it is highly expressed in fat tissue, it is also found in especially high levels in brown fat and is required for thermogenesis, the conversion of food into body heat. Researchers at the Scripps Research Institute took this knowledge … Continue reading The Role of A Recently Discovered Protein in Obesity

Viruses in Koalas Can Be Models for Genome Immunity

Ellie Teng ‘21 Retroviruses such as HIV are viruses that take genes from host cells and incorporate them into their own genomes. Transposons are DNA elements that can change positions in the genome, increasing the potential for mutations and genome instability. Piwi-interacting RNAs (piRNAs) guide the immune system towards silencing the transposons during germline development. Koalas infected by the retrovirus KoRV-A virus are immunodeficient and … Continue reading Viruses in Koalas Can Be Models for Genome Immunity

Improved Body Composition After Testosterone Treatment in Young Male Cancer Survivors

Priyanshi Patel ’22 Young male cancer survivors have low testosterone levels compared to those of  healthy populations. Long term effects of low testosterone involve endocrine disorders that affect up to 50% of adult childhood cancer survivors, and younger survivors are often unsure as to whether they would benefit from testosterone treatment. A study was conducted in the United Kingdom on secondary hospital outpatients.. The study … Continue reading Improved Body Composition After Testosterone Treatment in Young Male Cancer Survivors

Growth Factor Induces Methylation Changes in Lung Fibroblasts

Priyanshi Patel ’22 Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis (IPF) is an irreversible, chronic, and lethal disease of unknown etiology. IPF is characterized by excessive deposition of extracellular matrix (ECM), which is secreted mainly by activated fibroblasts under certain stimuli. Recent studies have evaluated alterations with DNA methylation as a collective driver of IPF. Few studies explore global DNA methylation in lung fibrosis, but none focused on transforming … Continue reading Growth Factor Induces Methylation Changes in Lung Fibroblasts