Loss of Sense of Smell Caused by COVID-19

Aditi Kaveti ‘23 The coronavirus pandemic has changed our lifestyles as we knew it. As we find ways to stay safe during the pandemic, research continues to bring us new information about COVID-19. One of the earliest and most commonly reported indicators of COVID-19 is the temporary loss of smell, or anosmia. Olfactory cells are the body’s smell nerve cells that are stimulated by the … Continue reading Loss of Sense of Smell Caused by COVID-19

Low-Level Mechanical Signaling to Stimulate Bone Growth

Aditi Kaveti ’23 Osteoporosis is a disease characterized by the reduction of bone quality and low bone mineral density (BMD). Bone resorption is the process by which osteoclasts break down bone tissue and release minerals, resulting  in a transfer of calcium from bone tissue to blood. When excessive resorption occurs, bones weaken and become brittle, which may eventually develop into osteoporosis. Bone health can be … Continue reading Low-Level Mechanical Signaling to Stimulate Bone Growth

The Future of COVID-19 Testing

Wendy Wu ’22 COVID-19 is a disease caused by a newly discovered coronavirus: SARS-CoV-2. First identified in Wuhan, China in late 2019, the coronavirus disease has become a pandemic within a matter of months, causing worldwide panic and hysteria. In this short time, nations and the World Health Organization struggled to contain the outbreak. In addition to treatment and vaccines, developing a test for COVID-19 … Continue reading The Future of COVID-19 Testing

Higher Education Correlates to Later Onset of Alzheimer’s

Priyanshi Patel ‘22 Professors including Sean Clauston, Dylan Smith, and many others of the Public Health and Department of Family, Population, and Preventative program at Stony Brook University wanted to examine the association between education and the incidence of accelerated cognitive decline. Alzheimer’s disease and related dementias (ADRD) affect 5.4 million people in the United States and are the cause of the fifth most common … Continue reading Higher Education Correlates to Later Onset of Alzheimer’s

Opioid Poisoning Rates on Long Island

Ayesha Azeem ‘23 The United States currently faces a growing opioid poisoning crisis. Opioid use can lead to significant impairment and distress, social problems, chronic relapsing abuse and even early death. According to the National Center for Health Statistics, New York is one of 5 states with the most opioid drug overdoses. Historically, those affected by nonfatal opioid poisoning tend to be white males, aged … Continue reading Opioid Poisoning Rates on Long Island

Chloroquine as a Promising Anti-Viral Drug in Immunocompromised Patients Amidst the COVID-19 Pandemic

Simran Kaur ‘20 SARS-CoV-2, a new type of coronavirus, is responsible for a global pandemic that currently has infected hundreds of thousands of individuals worldwide. The virus belongs to the same family of viruses responsible for certain cases of the common cold, Middle East Respiratory Syndrome, and Sudden Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS). The virus is incredibly contagious, spreading through respiratory droplets and exploiting commonly-found human … Continue reading Chloroquine as a Promising Anti-Viral Drug in Immunocompromised Patients Amidst the COVID-19 Pandemic

Genetic factors may be involved in disease risk of early-onset autoimmune thyroid disease

Panayiota Siskos ’23 Autoimmune thyroid diseases, such as Graves’ disease and Hashimoto’s disease, are often characterized by the infiltration of T cells and B cells in the thyroid as well as the production of antibodies specific to thyroid antigens. Genes including human leukocyte antigen (HLA), cytotoxic T lymphocyte-associated factor 4 (CTLA-4), CD40, and protein tyrosine phosphatase-22 (PTPN-22) have been previously associated with susceptibility to autoimmune … Continue reading Genetic factors may be involved in disease risk of early-onset autoimmune thyroid disease

Comfort Eating and Cortisol Reactivity

Ayesha Azeem ‘23 “Comfort-eating,” or increased food intake, is one of the most common responses to stressful situations. Cortisol is the body’s main stress hormone that regulates metabolism and the immune response to stressful situations. Cortisol reactivity under stress can predict stress-related eating behavior and how it affects the body mass index (BMI). Based on one’s cortisol reactivity to a stressor, a person may be … Continue reading Comfort Eating and Cortisol Reactivity

Dexamethasone as a Possible Treatment for Patients Diagnosed with Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome

Simran Kaur ‘20 Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is characterized by the build-up of fluid in the alveoli of the lungs, the main sites of gaseous exchange, causing a lack of oxygen in the body. ARDS is caused by sudden trauma to the lungs, and there currently is no pharmacological treatment for the condition. Researchers in the study sought to determine the efficacy of dexamethasone, … Continue reading Dexamethasone as a Possible Treatment for Patients Diagnosed with Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome

The Relationship Between Dopamine and Development of Asthma

Aditi Kaveti ‘23 Asthma is a chronic condition in the United States that affects more than 26 million people, including an estimated 6 million children. Asthma is described as an intermittent inflammation and narrowing of the airways in the lungs, wheezing, chest tightness, shortness of breath, and coughing. Inflammation is regulated by the nervous system which is regulated by the immune system. Harvard researcher Xingbin … Continue reading The Relationship Between Dopamine and Development of Asthma

The Role of A Recently Discovered Protein in Obesity

Ellie Teng ‘21 Progesterone receptor membrane component 2 (PGRMC2) is a signaling protein found in various parts of the body including the uterus and liver. While it is highly expressed in fat tissue, it is also found in especially high levels in brown fat and is required for thermogenesis, the conversion of food into body heat. Researchers at the Scripps Research Institute took this knowledge … Continue reading The Role of A Recently Discovered Protein in Obesity

Viruses in Koalas Can Be Models for Genome Immunity

Ellie Teng ‘21 Retroviruses such as HIV are viruses that take genes from host cells and incorporate them into their own genomes. Transposons are DNA elements that can change positions in the genome, increasing the potential for mutations and genome instability. Piwi-interacting RNAs (piRNAs) guide the immune system towards silencing the transposons during germline development. Koalas infected by the retrovirus KoRV-A virus are immunodeficient and … Continue reading Viruses in Koalas Can Be Models for Genome Immunity