Better sleep quality in college students leads to better performance in classes

Joyce Chen ‘23 College students are known for being sleep-deprived, sometimes sleeping for less than four hours a day or none at all. However, a lack of sleep can result in serious health consequences, such as a weakened immune system that makes people prone to illnesses. Recent research shows that sleep can improve concentration, energy, and mental and physical health in general.  To explore this … Continue reading Better sleep quality in college students leads to better performance in classes

Short-term relationships with violent men make women more prone to gender violence

Joyce Chen ‘23 Violence against women is a common occurence worldwide. In many countries, women are sexually abused or suffer from human trafficking. However, more research is needed to uncover the underlying factors that predispose women to such violence. Researchers under Lídia Puigvert utilized the ‘Free Teen Desire’ experimental project to study the link between females’ attractions to males and future gender violence as a … Continue reading Short-term relationships with violent men make women more prone to gender violence

The Role of A Recently Discovered Protein in Obesity

Ellie Teng ‘21 Progesterone receptor membrane component 2 (PGRMC2) is a signaling protein found in various parts of the body including the uterus and liver. While it is highly expressed in fat tissue, it is also found in especially high levels in brown fat and is required for thermogenesis, the conversion of food into body heat. Researchers at the Scripps Research Institute took this knowledge … Continue reading The Role of A Recently Discovered Protein in Obesity

Viruses in Koalas Can Be Models for Genome Immunity

Ellie Teng ‘21 Retroviruses such as HIV are viruses that take genes from host cells and incorporate them into their own genomes. Transposons are DNA elements that can change positions in the genome, increasing the potential for mutations and genome instability. Piwi-interacting RNAs (piRNAs) guide the immune system towards silencing the transposons during germline development. Koalas infected by the retrovirus KoRV-A virus are immunodeficient and … Continue reading Viruses in Koalas Can Be Models for Genome Immunity

All Eyes and Ears: How Visual Deprivation Enhances Auditory Learning in Adult Mice

Mariam Malik ‘22 Past research and work has proven the interconnectedness of all senses and their corresponding cortices in the brain. For example, it has been scientifically proven that those lacking in one sense possess advanced abilities in others. Cross-modal learning, or the manipulation of one sense to cause alterations in another, is a key feature of further research. Researchers at the University of Maryland … Continue reading All Eyes and Ears: How Visual Deprivation Enhances Auditory Learning in Adult Mice

21st Century Mind: The Effects of Blue-Light on the Brain, Retinas, and Rate of Aging

Mariam Malik ‘22 Blue light from electronic devices, such as smartphones and laptops, is of shorter wavelength on the light spectrum, thereby giving off higher amounts of energy. The harmful effects of absorbing too many light rays, such as UV and micro, have been researched and known. However, a recent study at Oregon State University on Drosophila melanogaster, the common fruit fly, shows the damaging … Continue reading 21st Century Mind: The Effects of Blue-Light on the Brain, Retinas, and Rate of Aging

Study Reveals Ability of Human Cartilage to Regenerate

Mariam Malik ‘22 Cartilage is malleable soft tissue meant to prevent excess friction from joints rubbing against one another. Located in numerous parts of the body, such as the larynx, respiratory tract, and the septum, human cartilage is the most malleable and widespread at birth, eventually being replaced by bone. For a long time, scientists believed that cartilage in joints could not be regrown; however, … Continue reading Study Reveals Ability of Human Cartilage to Regenerate

Cannabis as a Beneficial Alternative for Frequent Opioid Users with Chronic Pain

Priyanshi Patel ’22 The number of opioid-related deaths has continued to rise in  the United States and Canada. In regions where drug overdoses were declared a public health emergency, synthetic opioids in drug markets had caused large increases in death. Many people who use drugs lack access to adequate pain management through their healthcare system, thereby experiencing high rates of pain. More research is needed … Continue reading Cannabis as a Beneficial Alternative for Frequent Opioid Users with Chronic Pain

Essential Role of the MEKK3-ERK5 Module in Endothelial Cell Death

Jorge Pincay ’20 Atherosclerosis is a chronic inflammatory disease characterized by the build-up of plaque in artery walls, which can lead to coronary artery disease, heart failure, and stroke. Since atherosclerosis results from endothelial cell injury and death, researchers are making greater efforts to acquire a better understanding of the cellular mechanisms that may lead to these unfavorable changes in endothelial cells. In particular, the … Continue reading Essential Role of the MEKK3-ERK5 Module in Endothelial Cell Death

Can a Reduction in Carbohydrate Consumption Produce Adverse Effects?

Jorge Pincay ’20 Low carbohydrate  diets (LCD) have been adopted by many patients as a means of battling diseases such as cancer, diabetes, obesity, and many other metabolic disorders. This type of diet is even widely used by the general population for maintaining and/or losing weight. However, not many studies  have investigated the adverse health effects that may result from a sudden halt in carbohydrates … Continue reading Can a Reduction in Carbohydrate Consumption Produce Adverse Effects?