Meal Frequency and Timing Are Associated with Changes in Body Mass Index

Sabah Bari ’24 Everyone has been accustomed to the three meals of the day: breakfast, lunch and dinner. But what if the frequency and timing of those meals affect your overall health? Scientists have come up with a scale called the Body Mass Index which pertains to an individual’s age, height and weight to indicate if they are considered to be normal, underweight, overweight or … Continue reading Meal Frequency and Timing Are Associated with Changes in Body Mass Index

Mobile Applications Can Help Users Achieve Sustained Weight-loss

Yukta Kulkarni ’22 In the United States, obesity is an urgent issue, with more than 40% of Americans in 2017-2018 suffering from this disease, according to the CDC. Obesity can lead to other severe illnesses such as hypertension, type 2 diabetes, heart disease, and stroke. Thus, efforts to reduce the prevalence of obesity must be taken to improve population health. Diet and exercise aid in … Continue reading Mobile Applications Can Help Users Achieve Sustained Weight-loss

Biodiversity loss, emerging pathogens and human health risks

Thumyat Noe ’21 Research suggests that the number of zoonoses, diseases transmitted from humans to animals, has been increasing across the planet. This implies that the frequency of epidemics and pandemics may rise in the future. Zoonotic pathogens have an animal origin and have always existed, but their prevalence and geographic spread are increasing at an alarming rate. Wildlife pathogen epidemics are also on the … Continue reading Biodiversity loss, emerging pathogens and human health risks

Hyposalivation and its effect on oral health in elders

Panayiota Siskos ’23 The co-existence of systemic diseases and multiple medications causes elders to be more vulnerable to oral issues. Lower salivary flow (hyposalivation) is a common issue and may be due to xerostomia (when there is the feeling of having a dry mouth). Even though saliva production and composition are mostly age-dependent, medications can also influence salivary flow. Decrease of salivary flow may disrupt … Continue reading Hyposalivation and its effect on oral health in elders

Silent Voices of the Hungry

Gwenyth Mercep ’22 About one in five US households with children experience food insecurity [1]. Food-insecure families may employ protective strategies to deflect collective hardships on children and national data suggests that in general, adults believe they are very successful in doing so [1]. Only 1% of these parents reported their children to experience a reduction in nutritional quality or quantity [1]. Contrarily, data shows … Continue reading Silent Voices of the Hungry

A Prescription of Video Games for Stroke Patients

Wendy Wu ’22 Stroke, one of the leading causes of death in the United States, occurs when a clot or bleed prevents oxygenated blood from reaching the brain. If not enough oxygen is present, brain cells start to die, which can be fatal. While stroke fatalities have decreased over recent years, brain damage is still common in stroke patients; they are likely to experience problems … Continue reading A Prescription of Video Games for Stroke Patients

Chloroquine as a Promising Anti-Viral Drug in Immunocompromised Patients Amidst the COVID-19 Pandemic

Simran Kaur ‘20 SARS-CoV-2, a new type of coronavirus, is responsible for a global pandemic that currently has infected hundreds of thousands of individuals worldwide. The virus belongs to the same family of viruses responsible for certain cases of the common cold, Middle East Respiratory Syndrome, and Sudden Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS). The virus is incredibly contagious, spreading through respiratory droplets and exploiting commonly-found human … Continue reading Chloroquine as a Promising Anti-Viral Drug in Immunocompromised Patients Amidst the COVID-19 Pandemic

Association Between Gluten Uptake in Pregnant Mothers and Children

Priyanshi Patel ‘22 Type 1 diabetes is a very common disease often occurring in childhood, with highest rates in the Nordic countries. Type 1 diabetes occurs after a destruction of pancreatic beta cells which leads to lifelong dependence on insulin treatment. There are both genetic and nongenetic factors for playing a role in the aetiology of the disease. Gluten has been hypothesized to be an … Continue reading Association Between Gluten Uptake in Pregnant Mothers and Children

A Low-Carb Diet Can Increase Brain Stability in Individuals.

Priyanshi Patel ‘22 A study on neuroimaging led by Stony Brook professor Lilianne R. Mujica-Parodi reveals that neurobiological changes that are associated with aging can also be seen at a much younger age than expected. The study suggests that the effects of the changes can be prevented or reversed based on changes in diet that involve minimizing the consumption of carbohydrates. The research team at … Continue reading A Low-Carb Diet Can Increase Brain Stability in Individuals.

Genetic factors may be involved in disease risk of early-onset autoimmune thyroid disease

Panayiota Siskos ’23 Autoimmune thyroid diseases, such as Graves’ disease and Hashimoto’s disease, are often characterized by the infiltration of T cells and B cells in the thyroid as well as the production of antibodies specific to thyroid antigens. Genes including human leukocyte antigen (HLA), cytotoxic T lymphocyte-associated factor 4 (CTLA-4), CD40, and protein tyrosine phosphatase-22 (PTPN-22) have been previously associated with susceptibility to autoimmune … Continue reading Genetic factors may be involved in disease risk of early-onset autoimmune thyroid disease

Application of Trispecific Antibodies to Anticancer Immunotherapy

Ashley Goland ’23 Immunotherapy is a form of cancer treatment that utilizes the body’s own immune system to destroy cancerous tumors and has shown promise in past animal and clinical human trials. For all of its dazzling successes to date, however, immunotherapy is not completely effective for treating the full range of cancer types and patients— yet. Scientists working in Sanofi Research and Development believe … Continue reading Application of Trispecific Antibodies to Anticancer Immunotherapy

Comfort Eating and Cortisol Reactivity

Ayesha Azeem ‘23 “Comfort-eating,” or increased food intake, is one of the most common responses to stressful situations. Cortisol is the body’s main stress hormone that regulates metabolism and the immune response to stressful situations. Cortisol reactivity under stress can predict stress-related eating behavior and how it affects the body mass index (BMI). Based on one’s cortisol reactivity to a stressor, a person may be … Continue reading Comfort Eating and Cortisol Reactivity