How the Mental Health of College Students in China has been Affected by COVID-19

Yukta Kulkarni ’22 The COVID-19 pandemic has taken over the world in a way that disrupts almost everyone’s previous way of life. People can no longer leave their house without wearing a mask, socialize within 6 feet of friends and family, or go to work/school. These inconveniences are minor, though, compared to those that people diagnosed with, or know someone with, COVID-19 experience. This can … Continue reading How the Mental Health of College Students in China has been Affected by COVID-19

Child anxiety disorders and symptoms closely associated with specific maternal anxiety disorders

Priyanshi Patel ’22 Social anxiety disorder (SAD) is one of the most prevalent and disabling anxiety disorders with an onset age of 13 years. SAD is a chronic disorder with adverse psychiatric, social, and educational outcomes, which is why it is important to prevent it by understanding its risk factors. One known risk factor is behavioral inhibition (BI), the withdrawal from unfamiliar situations, environments, and … Continue reading Child anxiety disorders and symptoms closely associated with specific maternal anxiety disorders

The Impact of Pubertal Development on Anxiety Risk and Startle Habituation

Aditi Kaveti ‘23 As children begin pubertal development, they experience a host of changes that may contribute to feelings of anxiety, including increases in weight and height, changes in body shape, and hormonal fluctuations. In a study done in part by Felicia Jackson of the Department of Psychology at Stony Brook University, researchers examined the relationship between mean startle, startle habituation, pubertal development, behavioral inhibition … Continue reading The Impact of Pubertal Development on Anxiety Risk and Startle Habituation

Unseen Intimate Partner Violence in the Emergency Department

Gwenyth Mercep ’22 Domestic abuse incidence is pervasive and tightly correlated with a large scope of disproportionate health disparities yet is largely underrepresented in data collection. Individuals who experience intimate partner violence (IPV) access the emergency department (ED) more often compared to their counterparts and most notably for chronic and long withstanding health conditions [1]. Despite guidance urging emergency medicine (EM) physicians to screen patients … Continue reading Unseen Intimate Partner Violence in the Emergency Department

Does Reward Responsivity Moderate or Mediate Effects of Parental Depression on Offspring?

Panayiota Siskos 2023 Figure 1: Depression alters the reward responsivity, and is described as having less tendency to adjust behavior or put in effort for rewards. Depression has alterations in reward responsiveness constructs with subjective experiences of pleasure and neural activation for rewarding. Alterations may be assessed with neurophysiological measures including reward positivity event-related potential which correlates with positive emotionality in kids, behavioral, and self-report … Continue reading Does Reward Responsivity Moderate or Mediate Effects of Parental Depression on Offspring?

Psychosis from schizophrenia can lead to social isolation

Joyce Chen ‘23 As humans, we are able to distinguish between what is real and what is not. But sometimes, the lines between reality and fantasy can get blurred. Psychosis is a mental condition where an individual loses his or her sense of perception due to an impairment in thought, resulting in a loss of connection with reality. Untreated psychosis has been theorized to be … Continue reading Psychosis from schizophrenia can lead to social isolation

Can Immediate Gains in Single-Session Intervention Predict Long-Symptom Change?

Panayiota Siskos ’23 Single-session interventions (SSIs) for youth mental health problems show promise to prevent and reduce youth psychopathology and may be a good alternative to the more traditional multi-session ones that are inaccessible due to logistical and financial obstacles. However, SSIs may not be beneficial for everyone, and it is important to differentiate the needs of youths. Immediate gains, or improvements, in program-specific targets, … Continue reading Can Immediate Gains in Single-Session Intervention Predict Long-Symptom Change?

How Willing are Babies to Share Food?

Ayesha Azeem ‘23 Altruistic behavior is an intraspecies trait seen in no other species other than humans. Food altruism in particular involves giving nutritious food to needy strangers, even if one desires the food. Humans have developed customs and institutions to provide the needy with food, even when scarce and they need it themselves. Surprisingly, though altruism has been noted in humans, it is not … Continue reading How Willing are Babies to Share Food?

The importance of first impressions

Joyce Chen ’23 When it comes to meeting someone new, a first impression is especially significant. Naturally, humans want to create an everlasting effect or influence on others from their very first impression; However, there are several drawbacks, one of which being dominance. A study conducted by Laura Clark at the University of Lincoln aims to investigate the judgments of people based on the facial … Continue reading The importance of first impressions

Threatening cues have a larger effect on perception than neutral cues

Panayiota Siskos ’23 The theory of predictive coding states that the brain continuously creates a mental model of the surrounding environment using prior knowledge from memory. This mental model is then used to predict sensory input, such as anticipating a smell, a sound, or a touch.  A group of researchers from Stony Brook University and Columbia University studied the effect of threatening cues on sensory … Continue reading Threatening cues have a larger effect on perception than neutral cues

Comfort Eating and Cortisol Reactivity

Ayesha Azeem ‘23 “Comfort-eating,” or increased food intake, is one of the most common responses to stressful situations. Cortisol is the body’s main stress hormone that regulates metabolism and the immune response to stressful situations. Cortisol reactivity under stress can predict stress-related eating behavior and how it affects the body mass index (BMI). Based on one’s cortisol reactivity to a stressor, a person may be … Continue reading Comfort Eating and Cortisol Reactivity

Examining the Benefits of Unique Coloration for Male Trinidad Guppies

Fatin Chowdhury ’20 The predisposition of organisms in seeking certain phenotypic traits in mates is an oft-observed aspect of the natural world, with sexual selection being a well-studied phenomenon. However, unique coloration specifically often seems to be more linked to lessened survivability (due to an inability to camouflage in environments), or phenomena such as aposematism, where unique colors serve as a warning for predators. In … Continue reading Examining the Benefits of Unique Coloration for Male Trinidad Guppies