Changes in Retinal Chromatin Allow Animals To Be Nocturnal

Mariam Malik ‘22 Night vision allows nocturnal animals to be active at nighttime and sleep when the sun is out, while diurnal animals are active during the day and sleep at night. However, when both diurnal and nocturnal animals are born, their ocular abilities are equal until a change in the cells of the eye occurs, allowing the animal to see in the dark. Through … Continue reading Changes in Retinal Chromatin Allow Animals To Be Nocturnal

Tfh13: The Cells Involved In An Allergic Reaction

Mariam Malik ’22 Anaphylaxis is the biological reaction of the body to an allergy, in which airways are constricted and blood pressure suddenly drops. Anaphylactic shock can result from various allergies, including food and insect stings. Previous research has shown that during an allergic reaction, the immune system releases high levels of high-affinity Immunoglobin (IgE) antibodies, which then strongly bind to allergens to form an … Continue reading Tfh13: The Cells Involved In An Allergic Reaction

Is Eternal Life Actually Possible? New Drug Formula May Reverse Biological Age

Joyce Chen ’23 Biological age is the measurement of the true ages of humans through the chemical changes in their DNA. Previous research and hypotheses inferred that reversing this can allow humans to acquire better immune systems and healthier bodies in general. To test if biological age reversal is actually possible, determined scientists from Intervene Immune and the University of California, Los Angeles, completed a … Continue reading Is Eternal Life Actually Possible? New Drug Formula May Reverse Biological Age

A Long-Term Solution for Individuals Living With Peanut Allergies

Aditi Kaveti ’23 Peanut allergies affect 6% to 8% of children around the world. Living with severe allergies is extremely dangerous and requires close monitoring of the ingredients in packaged foods and at restaurants. Many packaged products warn that the food was manufactured in a facility that processes peanuts or tree nuts. These trace amounts seem inconsequential, but they can lead to severe allergic reactions. … Continue reading A Long-Term Solution for Individuals Living With Peanut Allergies

The Future of Prosthetics Technology

Aditi Kaveti ’23 People with hand amputations often rely on prosthetic hands and services and face difficult daily challenges in performing simple tasks. The conventional prosthetic hand restores mobility but does not provide realistic human hand-like features. The inability to perform daily activities affects the quality of life and can be damaging to the patient’s mental health and well-being. A new electronic glove boasts the … Continue reading The Future of Prosthetics Technology

Eating Junk Food Leads to Blindness

Ellie Teng ’21 A case report presented a 14 year old male adolescent with “fussy” eating habits feeling fatigued. Scientists from Bristol Medical School and the Bristol Eye Hospital performed tests that showed anemia and low levels of vitamin B12 but the patient was otherwise well. At 15, he was suffering from hearing loss and not long after, deteriorating vision. He was referred to an … Continue reading Eating Junk Food Leads to Blindness

Early Initiation of Breastfeeding Proves to be Highly Beneficial to Newborns

Priyanshi Patel ’22 Sepsis is the common pathway that leads to neonatal death due to severe illnesses and various infections. Neonatal sepsis is the main cause of neonatal deaths in most developing countries and causes 13% of deaths during the neonatal period and 42% of deaths just after 7 days. The World Health Organization (WHO) recommends early initiation of breastfeeding within 1 hour of giving … Continue reading Early Initiation of Breastfeeding Proves to be Highly Beneficial to Newborns

The Association Between Coffee Products and Breast Cancer Risk in Hong Kong

Ayesha Azeem ‘23 In women, breast cancer is universally seen as the most common cancer, with diet being one of the most important factors in causing the condition. Coffee is one of the most popular drinks available in the world and, in Hong Kong, a recent fan-favorite. From 2010 to 2018, coffee revenue skyrocketed from 119 million USD to 279 million USD. With the obvious … Continue reading The Association Between Coffee Products and Breast Cancer Risk in Hong Kong

Martial Arts and Love

Ayesha Azeem ‘23 Oxytocin (OT), familiarly known as the “love drug,” is a hormone that promotes feelings of social bonding, sexual reproduction and cooperation. Because of its apparent positive effects, researchers are currently investigating how to increase levels of oxytocin internally and without artificial interference. In a recent study conducted by the Bar-Ilan University Department of Psychology in Israel, Yuri Rassovsky and team considered the … Continue reading Martial Arts and Love

The Use of Focused Ultrasound for Enhanced Delivery of Gene Therapy Across the Blood-Brain-Barrier

Jorge Pincay ‘20 Huntington’s disease (HD) is an autosomal dominant neurodegenerative disease that results in the degradation of nerve cells in the brain over time. This disease is the result of a DNA mutation — a cytosine-adenine-guanine (CAG) trinucleotide repeat expansion– that occurs in the gene that encodes for the huntingtin (Htt) protein. This repeat expansion causes a highly toxic form of the Htt protein … Continue reading The Use of Focused Ultrasound for Enhanced Delivery of Gene Therapy Across the Blood-Brain-Barrier