Leisure Time or Lost Time: How Negative Beliefs About Leisure Exacerbate Mental Illnesses

Ayesha Azeem ’23 Although it is enjoyable to take breaks away from work and obligations, certain factors can undermine this enjoyment, like tracked or scheduled leisure time. Leisure provides people with a sense of control in life and can reduce the risk of depression. These benefits, however, may be less impactful in people who believe that taking time out for leisure is wasteful. Rutgers University … Continue reading Leisure Time or Lost Time: How Negative Beliefs About Leisure Exacerbate Mental Illnesses

Nationwide RCT Single Session Interventions on Depression in Adolescents: COVID-19 edition

Daphne Siozios ’23 Once the coronavirus pandemic emerged, distress due to isolation caused an immediate surge in adolescent depression. While depression in youths was already regarded as the biggest psychosocial adversity prior to COVID-19, newfound disruption of social-emotional support because of direct seclusion resulting from the pandemic has led to elevated depression. By observing randomized controlled trials of brief, scalable interventions, it has been said … Continue reading Nationwide RCT Single Session Interventions on Depression in Adolescents: COVID-19 edition

Online Survey of the Impact of COVID-19 Risk and Cost Estimates on Worry and Health Behavior Compliance in Young Adult

Thumyat Noe ’23 The COVID-19 pandemic has led to major mental health consequences such as anxiety and non-compliance with health guidelines within the general population, especially among young adults. To effectively treat anxiety and encourage compliance with public health guidelines among young adults, it is important to understand factors that contribute to COVID-19 related anxiety as well as decision-making mechanisms that contribute to compliance with … Continue reading Online Survey of the Impact of COVID-19 Risk and Cost Estimates on Worry and Health Behavior Compliance in Young Adult

How Telehealth Visits Raise Standard of Patient Care

Ayesha Azeem ‘23 The COVID-19 pandemic has dramatically affected all aspects of the healthcare field, especially inpatient care. When the lockdowns began, emergency surgeries remained unaffected while elective surgeries, like weight loss (bariatric) surgeries, were immediately given lesser priority. In outpatient interactions, many providers had to rapidly adjust to telemedicine to continue accommodating healthcare and keep the community safe from virus transmission. Interestingly, telemedicine had … Continue reading How Telehealth Visits Raise Standard of Patient Care

Nerinetide Application Establishes Reperfusion in Ischemic Stroke Patients Receiving Non-Standard Post-EVT Care

Vignesh Subramanian ’24 Ischemic stroke, the subtype accounting for the vast majority of strokes, frequently occurs following obstruction of blood vessels by plaques or clots. This cerebrovascular accident is often characterized by the debilitating effects of postsynaptic density protein 95 (PSD-95), a scaffolding protein that typically mediates localization of neurotransmitter receptors such as NMDARs but does so excessively in the wake of strokes, triggering mass … Continue reading Nerinetide Application Establishes Reperfusion in Ischemic Stroke Patients Receiving Non-Standard Post-EVT Care

Angioplasty and Stenting Procedure Risks Worsening Ischemic Stroke Prognosis

Vignesh Subramanian ’24 Intracranial atherosclerotic stenosis (ICAS) – the progressive narrowing of, and restriction of blood flow to, a major artery in the brain – is among the most common causes of ischemic stroke as well as recurrent stroke of any subtype. ICAS is responsible for the gradual obstruction of blood supply due to buildup of plaque within vessels, which is typically followed by excessive … Continue reading Angioplasty and Stenting Procedure Risks Worsening Ischemic Stroke Prognosis

Meal Frequency and Timing Are Associated with Changes in Body Mass Index

Sabah Bari ’24 Everyone has been accustomed to the three meals of the day: breakfast, lunch and dinner. But what if the frequency and timing of those meals affect your overall health? Scientists have come up with a scale called the Body Mass Index which pertains to an individual’s age, height and weight to indicate if they are considered to be normal, underweight, overweight or … Continue reading Meal Frequency and Timing Are Associated with Changes in Body Mass Index

Mobile Applications Can Help Users Achieve Sustained Weight-loss

Yukta Kulkarni ’22 In the United States, obesity is an urgent issue, with more than 40% of Americans in 2017-2018 suffering from this disease, according to the CDC. Obesity can lead to other severe illnesses such as hypertension, type 2 diabetes, heart disease, and stroke. Thus, efforts to reduce the prevalence of obesity must be taken to improve population health. Diet and exercise aid in … Continue reading Mobile Applications Can Help Users Achieve Sustained Weight-loss

Ageism during the Covid-19 Pandemic

Yukta Kulkarni ’22 The Covid-19 pandemic has affected the day-to-day lives of countless people. Experts predict that society will revert to how it was pre-pandemic with the development of the Covid-19 vaccine. However, since a limited number of vaccines have been produced and shipped to vaccination centers, demand currently outweighs the supply. Nevertheless, ageism is prevalent in the United States and has intensified within the … Continue reading Ageism during the Covid-19 Pandemic

Alexa, How’s My Heart Rate?

Aditi Kaveti ‘23 While heart conditions including high blood pressure and cardiac arrest are well-known, heart rhythm disorders, such as cardiac arrhythmia, are actually more common. The improper beating of the heart can lead to serious diseases like strokes but can be difficult to diagnose and identify because they do not present a periodic pattern in the data.  Shyam Gollakota, an associate professor in the … Continue reading Alexa, How’s My Heart Rate?

Biodiversity loss, emerging pathogens and human health risks

Thumyat Noe ’21 Research suggests that the number of zoonoses, diseases transmitted from humans to animals, has been increasing across the planet. This implies that the frequency of epidemics and pandemics may rise in the future. Zoonotic pathogens have an animal origin and have always existed, but their prevalence and geographic spread are increasing at an alarming rate. Wildlife pathogen epidemics are also on the … Continue reading Biodiversity loss, emerging pathogens and human health risks

Overexpression of FABP3 contributive to Aging Skeletal Muscle via ER stress

Sooraj Shah ’24 Sarcopenia is a disease which leads to the loss of muscle mass and function by skeletal muscle. According to Dr. Stephan von Haehling (2), a professor at Charité Medical School, the disease affects nearly 5-13% of adults 60-70 years of age, and rises to 11-50% of adults 80 years of age and older. While Sarcopenia is known to be caused by factors … Continue reading Overexpression of FABP3 contributive to Aging Skeletal Muscle via ER stress