The association between digital screen time and myopia: A systematic review

Sabah Bari ‘24 With the advancement of technology and the creation of new digital platforms, many individuals have experienced an increase in screen time, which may heighten the risk for many health-related issues, especially in the eyes. Myopia, also known as nearsightedness and shortsightedness, is a condition in which parallel rays are focused in front of the retina. Light rays converge to a focal point … Continue reading The association between digital screen time and myopia: A systematic review

Terahertz Spectroscopy to Improve Burn Injury Assessment

Aditi Kaveti ‘23 Burn injuries are painful, potentially life-threatening, and can often require long and complex treatment. Early and accurate assessment of burn injuries is important to determining the correct path of treatment. However, the severity of burns can be difficult to visually diagnose accurately, and clinical evaluations of burns only have about a 50 to 70 percent accuracy. This complexity allows for a significant … Continue reading Terahertz Spectroscopy to Improve Burn Injury Assessment

Loss of Sense of Smell Caused by COVID-19

Aditi Kaveti ‘23 The coronavirus pandemic has changed our lifestyles as we knew it. As we find ways to stay safe during the pandemic, research continues to bring us new information about COVID-19. One of the earliest and most commonly reported indicators of COVID-19 is the temporary loss of smell, or anosmia. Olfactory cells are the body’s smell nerve cells that are stimulated by the … Continue reading Loss of Sense of Smell Caused by COVID-19

The Impact of Patient Intellectual Disability on Organ Transplantation Candidacy

Gwenyth Mercep ’22 Disqualifying patients with intellectual disabilities (ID) from receiving organ transplantation is an unfortunate reality in healthcare. Compared with the evidence-based criteria used to determine transplant eligibility, the ID model has the potential to be discriminatory and subjective [1]. The use of ID in transplant candidacy may stem from perceived worse adherence and outcomes for patients with ID, concern of penalties to transplant … Continue reading The Impact of Patient Intellectual Disability on Organ Transplantation Candidacy

Low-Level Mechanical Signaling to Stimulate Bone Growth

Aditi Kaveti ’23 Osteoporosis is a disease characterized by the reduction of bone quality and low bone mineral density (BMD). Bone resorption is the process by which osteoclasts break down bone tissue and release minerals, resulting  in a transfer of calcium from bone tissue to blood. When excessive resorption occurs, bones weaken and become brittle, which may eventually develop into osteoporosis. Bone health can be … Continue reading Low-Level Mechanical Signaling to Stimulate Bone Growth

Silent Voices of the Hungry

Gwenyth Mercep ’22 About one in five US households with children experience food insecurity [1]. Food-insecure families may employ protective strategies to deflect collective hardships on children and national data suggests that in general, adults believe they are very successful in doing so [1]. Only 1% of these parents reported their children to experience a reduction in nutritional quality or quantity [1]. Contrarily, data shows … Continue reading Silent Voices of the Hungry

Developing Genetic Tools for Eukaryotic Marine Microbes

Gaurav Sharma ’22 Sea life may hold one of the most diverse microbial ecosystems since we have not yet uncovered all of the mysteries and organisms teeming among the depths. Among the microbes that have been studied are eukaryotic microbes which range in diversity. When it comes to studying these organisms, researchers are presented with a challenge and can only genetically study some of these … Continue reading Developing Genetic Tools for Eukaryotic Marine Microbes

Novel Method Helps Reveal Prognosis of Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

Gaurav Sharma ’22 For the past couple of years, lung cancer has been responsible for the most cancer-related deaths in the general population. One variation of lung cancer is non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) which constitutes more than 80% of tumor growths originating in the lungs. NSCLC can be treated but 40% of patients have a recurrence of NSCLC highlighting the critical need for a … Continue reading Novel Method Helps Reveal Prognosis of Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

The Future of COVID-19 Testing

Wendy Wu ’22 COVID-19 is a disease caused by a newly discovered coronavirus: SARS-CoV-2. First identified in Wuhan, China in late 2019, the coronavirus disease has become a pandemic within a matter of months, causing worldwide panic and hysteria. In this short time, nations and the World Health Organization struggled to contain the outbreak. In addition to treatment and vaccines, developing a test for COVID-19 … Continue reading The Future of COVID-19 Testing

Trispecific Antibodies in Anticancer Immunotherapy

Ashley Goland ’23 Immunotherapy is a form of cancer treatment that utilizes the body’s own immune system to destroy cancerous tumors and has shown promise in past animal and clinical human trials. For all of its dazzling successes to date, however, immunotherapy is not completely effective for treating the full range of cancer types and patients— yet. Scientists working in Sanofi Research and Development believe … Continue reading Trispecific Antibodies in Anticancer Immunotherapy

Cryopreservation of semen without using egg yolk

Panayiota Siskos ’23 Cryopreservation of semen conserves genetic information and allows fertilization via artificial insemination. Egg yolk is an ingredient of bull semen extender, which buffers sperm from temperature and environmental stressors. However, egg yolk composition is very variable between different producers. Cholesterol is a molecule that strengthens membrane structures. Increasing cholesterol content in sperm plasma membrane increases cryotolerance, allowing sperm to survive freezing temperatures. … Continue reading Cryopreservation of semen without using egg yolk

Our Health Can Affect Our Appearance on Social Media

Ayesha Azeem ‘23 Due to the current Coronavirus pandemic, social distancing is in full effect, and one of the few ways in which we can remain in touch with our loved ones is on social media. Social media encompasses a large part of today’s generation’s lives; we present an ideal version of ourselves online, controlling how we want to be perceived by the world. Recently, … Continue reading Our Health Can Affect Our Appearance on Social Media