Opioid Poisoning Rates on Long Island

Ayesha Azeem ‘23 The United States currently faces a growing opioid poisoning crisis. Opioid use can lead to significant impairment and distress, social problems, chronic relapsing abuse and even early death. According to the National Center for Health Statistics, New York is one of 5 states with the most opioid drug overdoses. Historically, those affected by nonfatal opioid poisoning tend to be white males, aged … Continue reading Opioid Poisoning Rates on Long Island

The Role of Gene Expression Variation in the Development of Mammalian Drug Resistance

Simran Kaur ‘20 Designing drugs is often challenging because identical cells within a specific network will exhibit varying genetic expression (noise), resulting in drug resistance. The source of this variation is most often stochastic, accumulations of random fluctuations occurring during transcription, translation, and post-translational regulation. Gene expression noise currently poses as the greatest barrier in finding a cure for cancer and Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV). … Continue reading The Role of Gene Expression Variation in the Development of Mammalian Drug Resistance

Chloroquine as a Promising Anti-Viral Drug in Immunocompromised Patients Amidst the COVID-19 Pandemic

Simran Kaur ‘20 SARS-CoV-2, a new type of coronavirus, is responsible for a global pandemic that currently has infected hundreds of thousands of individuals worldwide. The virus belongs to the same family of viruses responsible for certain cases of the common cold, Middle East Respiratory Syndrome, and Sudden Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS). The virus is incredibly contagious, spreading through respiratory droplets and exploiting commonly-found human … Continue reading Chloroquine as a Promising Anti-Viral Drug in Immunocompromised Patients Amidst the COVID-19 Pandemic

Association Between Gluten Uptake in Pregnant Mothers and Children

Priyanshi Patel ‘22 Type 1 diabetes is a very common disease often occurring in childhood, with highest rates in the Nordic countries. Type 1 diabetes occurs after a destruction of pancreatic beta cells which leads to lifelong dependence on insulin treatment. There are both genetic and nongenetic factors for playing a role in the aetiology of the disease. Gluten has been hypothesized to be an … Continue reading Association Between Gluten Uptake in Pregnant Mothers and Children

A Low-Carb Diet Can Increase Brain Stability in Individuals.

Priyanshi Patel ‘22 A study on neuroimaging led by Stony Brook professor Lilianne R. Mujica-Parodi reveals that neurobiological changes that are associated with aging can also be seen at a much younger age than expected. The study suggests that the effects of the changes can be prevented or reversed based on changes in diet that involve minimizing the consumption of carbohydrates. The research team at … Continue reading A Low-Carb Diet Can Increase Brain Stability in Individuals.

Inactivated Gene Linked to Kidney Cancer and Tumor Development in Mice

Gaurav Sharma ’22 The epigenetic components pertaining to the onset of cancer have been of interest for many years due to the hope of developing approaches to delay the onset of cancer in the future for an individual. Recently, a tumor suppressor family has been discovered, called Ras-Association Domain Family (RASSF) which epigenetically inactivated breast, lung, skin, and thyroid cancers. Neither RASSF10’s in-vivo function nor … Continue reading Inactivated Gene Linked to Kidney Cancer and Tumor Development in Mice

After the Fall: Link Between PTSD and Prostate Cancer

Wendy Wu ’22 On the morning of September 11, 2001, the Twin Towers of the World Trade Center (WTC) collapsed. Within minutes, first responders arrived on the scene. Amidst the debris and smothering dust, they got to work, evacuating citizens and heading into the towers to rescue whoever they could. It was truly a display of heroic bravery and compassion, but unfortunately, many of the … Continue reading After the Fall: Link Between PTSD and Prostate Cancer

The Disappearance of the Y Chromosome (And Other Chromosomes)

Wendy Wu ’22 The Y-chromosome is quite unlike its homologue, the X-chromosome. With a relatively lacking number of genes, the Y-chromosome is the only chromosome inessential for life; its major function is to determine the sex of offspring. How did this come to be the case? A part of the reason is that the Y-chromosome does not occur as a pair; it does not have … Continue reading The Disappearance of the Y Chromosome (And Other Chromosomes)

Psychosis from schizophrenia can lead to social isolation

Joyce Chen ‘23 As humans, we are able to distinguish between what is real and what is not. But sometimes, the lines between reality and fantasy can get blurred. Psychosis is a mental condition where an individual loses his or her sense of perception due to an impairment in thought, resulting in a loss of connection with reality. Untreated psychosis has been theorized to be … Continue reading Psychosis from schizophrenia can lead to social isolation

Genetic factors may be involved in disease risk of early-onset autoimmune thyroid disease

Panayiota Siskos ’23 Autoimmune thyroid diseases, such as Graves’ disease and Hashimoto’s disease, are often characterized by the infiltration of T cells and B cells in the thyroid as well as the production of antibodies specific to thyroid antigens. Genes including human leukocyte antigen (HLA), cytotoxic T lymphocyte-associated factor 4 (CTLA-4), CD40, and protein tyrosine phosphatase-22 (PTPN-22) have been previously associated with susceptibility to autoimmune … Continue reading Genetic factors may be involved in disease risk of early-onset autoimmune thyroid disease