Brief Digital Interventions Can Alleviate Adolescent Depressive Symptoms

Vignesh Subramanian ’24 Depression is a mood disorder involving persistent feelings of dejection or hopelessness, difficulty with control of emotions, and loss of interest or pleasure in regular activities. As depressive disorders are increasingly recognized as a legitimate medical issue and treatment is destigmatized, younger generations in the United States have consistently reported higher rates of experiencing such conditions. However, less than half of afflicted … Continue reading Brief Digital Interventions Can Alleviate Adolescent Depressive Symptoms

Psychological Applications of Machine Learning: Quantifying the Risk of Prenatal Depression

Zhifei Zeng ’23 Current research suggests that factors such as socioeconomic deprivation, inadequate prenatal care, unplanned pregnancy, and psychosocial vulnerability such as stress may contribute to prenatal depression. PROMOTE is a newly developed screening tool that identifies psychosocial vulnerability in prenatal populations by assessing social determinants of health, social resources, stress and health behaviors. A research group led by Heidi Preis of Stony Brook University … Continue reading Psychological Applications of Machine Learning: Quantifying the Risk of Prenatal Depression

Depression as a Risk Factor for Severe COVID-19 Infection

Peter Gillespie ’25 Covid-19 has been at the forefront of concern for many since the pandemic struck, especially for patients with risk factors for severe diseases if infected by Covid-19. Respiratory and cardiovascular disease, old age, hypertension, and diabetes have already been established as high risk factors for severe Covid-19 infection. However, recent research from Dr. Sean Clouston and his colleagues has identified a new … Continue reading Depression as a Risk Factor for Severe COVID-19 Infection

Not A Coincidence: Adolescent Women Are More Likely To Suffer From Depression

Figure 1: Cambridge University research team finds adolescent women’s brain development and genes may make them more likely to suffer from depression. Zhifei Zeng ’23 Women are often perceived to be more prone to being sentimental. This apparent connection may not be coincidental, but rather related to the biological makeup of the female brain. Adolescence is a time of critical brain development, but it is … Continue reading Not A Coincidence: Adolescent Women Are More Likely To Suffer From Depression

Poor Mother-Child Relationships Play an Influential Role In The Intergenerational Transmission of Depression

Jessica George ’24 Depression is a multifactorial condition, shaped by a variety of social factors such as relationships with others. Early childhood is a pivotal time of an individual’s life in shaping future interactions and behaviors. During this stage in life, parents play a vital role in a child’s social development, which poses the question of how a parent-child relationship could affect a child’s vulnerability … Continue reading Poor Mother-Child Relationships Play an Influential Role In The Intergenerational Transmission of Depression

Long Distance Ski Racing Correlated with Low Depression Development

Sooraj Shah ’24 Figure 1: Long term exercise such as skiing may reduce chances of developing depression Depression affects 5-10% of people in the United States. Combined with other disorders, depression can consume about 20-30% of a person’s lifetime. The most common therapeutic strategy to treat depression includes serotonin reuptake inhibitors, which increase serotonin levels in the brain. A major drawback to this treatment, however, … Continue reading Long Distance Ski Racing Correlated with Low Depression Development

Loss of NG2 Glia Implicated in Emergence of Depression Symptoms

Vignesh Subramanian ’24 Glia are non-neuronal cells that host and provide a number of homeostatic ancillary functions in both the central (CNS) and peripheral (PNS) nervous systems. Though only recently discovered and characterized, glial cells vastly outnumber neurons and provide them with structural support and insular protection, driving their myelination (the process of forming coverings known as myelin sheaths that coat neurons’ signaling axons), facilitating … Continue reading Loss of NG2 Glia Implicated in Emergence of Depression Symptoms

The Effect of Coffee and Caffeine on Healthcare Workers in Iran

Yukta Kulkarni ’22 Coffee, specifically the consumption of caffeine, is prevalent across the world. When studying the effects of caffeine on psychological disorders, previous studies have led to inconclusive results. However, most of the research has been completed in Western and first-world countries. Since there are differences in culture and nutrition in varying regions, it is important to see the effects of caffeine in other … Continue reading The Effect of Coffee and Caffeine on Healthcare Workers in Iran

History of Maternal Depression May Correlate with Hippocampal Volume in their Children

Yukta Kulkarni ’22 Depression is defined as a mental disorder in which a person has consistent feelings of sadness and a severe loss of interest. Affecting all age groups, parents can be inflicted with depression or depression-like symptoms. Previous studies have found that children of parents suffering from depression have an increased risk of developing psychiatric disorders during their lifetimes. However, the process of how … Continue reading History of Maternal Depression May Correlate with Hippocampal Volume in their Children

Early Onset Depressive Disorders in Adolescent Females

Yukta Kulkarni ’22 Depression is an illness that can cause feelings of sadness and can affect the way one thinks and acts. The first onset of depression is seen in childhood and often precedes chronic depression later on in life. Interestingly, it is correlated with differences in biological sex, as females have a 30% higher chance of struggling with first onset depression compared to males. … Continue reading Early Onset Depressive Disorders in Adolescent Females

Money Matters: Investigating Neural Responses to Monetary and Social Feedback

Thumyat Noe ’23 Depression and social anxiety disorders are two of the most common psychopathologies in adults. One way to identify these disorders is by looking at event-related potentials (ERPs) which are measurable brain responses to stimuli. “Reward positivity” is an event-related potential that reflects neural positivity toward rewards and activation of a reinforcement learning system. Previous studies suggest that smaller reward positivity potentials correlate … Continue reading Money Matters: Investigating Neural Responses to Monetary and Social Feedback

Grip Strength as an Avenue of Depression Prediction

Sooraj Shah ’24 Depression is a mental state in which individuals often feel disinterested in everyday activities, preventing them from taking advantage of life’s opportunities. Interestingly, depression seems to take a physical form as well, with muscle strength and functionality being a main area of concern. Unfortunately, muscle failures often go untreated because the majority of people with depression tend to reject treatment. In a … Continue reading Grip Strength as an Avenue of Depression Prediction