Our Health Can Affect Our Appearance on Social Media

Ayesha Azeem ‘23 Due to the current Coronavirus pandemic, social distancing is in full effect, and one of the few ways in which we can remain in touch with our loved ones is on social media. Social media encompasses a large part of today’s generation’s lives; we present an ideal version of ourselves online, controlling how we want to be perceived by the world. Recently, … Continue reading Our Health Can Affect Our Appearance on Social Media

A Psychological Look into Vaccine Apprehension

Gwenyth Mercep ’22 The role of autonomy, or self-reliance, in medical decision making is intertwined with the complex narrative surrounding vaccinations. Vaccinations are a paramount preventative tool responsible for completely eradicating certain diseases and drastically reducing the incidence of others.  Although vaccine hesitancy is often positioned in mainstream media as resulting from pseudoscience or misinformation about safety, psychological traits like reactance can also play a … Continue reading A Psychological Look into Vaccine Apprehension

Medical Needles in the Social Media Haystack

Gwenyth Mercep ’22 In today’s digital age, there’s a lot of potentially useful information in circulation. With many of us compelled to share monologues on social media platforms, like Facebook, the landscape of data research is being revolutionized. Researchers from the University of Pennsylvania studied this change by using Facebook data to test the confluence of social media noise as indicating factors of the well-being … Continue reading Medical Needles in the Social Media Haystack

Better sleep quality in college students leads to better performance in classes

Joyce Chen ‘23 College students are known for being sleep-deprived, sometimes sleeping for less than four hours a day or none at all. However, a lack of sleep can result in serious health consequences, such as a weakened immune system that makes people prone to illnesses. Recent research shows that sleep can improve concentration, energy, and mental and physical health in general.  To explore this … Continue reading Better sleep quality in college students leads to better performance in classes

Neutrophils Escort Circulating Tumor Cells and Increase Metastatic Potential

By Nicole Zhao ’20 Numerous cancer research projects are dedicated to investigating the primary tumor and its microenvironment. Though this is undoubtedly important, the role of immune cells during cancer dispersion in the blood cells is largely uncharacterized. Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) lead to metastasis of several types of cancers and its levels are often a predictor of survival rate. These cells are often found … Continue reading Neutrophils Escort Circulating Tumor Cells and Increase Metastatic Potential

Sleep Modulates Hematopoiesis and Protects Against Atherosclerosis

By Nicole Zhao ’20 Numerous pathological conditions such as obesity, diabetes, cancer, and cardiovascular disease have been connected to insufficient or interrupted sleep. However, little is known about the specific mechanisms by which sleep maintains health. In this study, it was found that sleep regulates hematopoiesis and protects against atherosclerosis in mice. Hematopoiesis is the process of forming blood cellular components from stem cells. Research … Continue reading Sleep Modulates Hematopoiesis and Protects Against Atherosclerosis

Correlation Between the Mediterranean Diet and age-related Macular Degeneration

By Mariam Malik ‘22 The human eye’s abilities are often taken granted. Currently, roughly 1.8 million Americans are affected by age-related macular degeneration (AMD), one of the leading causes of blindness. AMD directly affects the eye’s central vision, which is vital in individuals’ abilities to see faces and read. Researchers from the European Union have collected and analyzed data that links the Mediterranean Diet to … Continue reading Correlation Between the Mediterranean Diet and age-related Macular Degeneration

The affect of hunger on brain health

By Mariam Malik ‘22 It is not uncommon to hear to blame a moment of overreaction on being hungry. However, the connection between the two has not been greatly explored until recently. At the University of Guelph in Canada, PhD student Thomas Homran led an experiment on mice to see what it is that makes us “hangry”. In one small room, a group of rats … Continue reading The affect of hunger on brain health

Figure 1. Lutein is a naturally occurring pigment found within foods such as kiwifruits. A study from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign suggests that an intake of lutein can reduce cognitive decline in adults.

The Effects of Carotenoids on Cognitive Ability

By Caleb Sooknanan ’20 Lutein — a carotenoid or pigment from green foods such as spinach and kiwifruit — can be quantified in central nervous system tissue, making it a useful way of evaluating diet’s effect on the brain. However, scientists are still determining whether higher lutein amounts yield cognitive ability improvements. Doctor Naiman A. Khan and researchers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign … Continue reading The Effects of Carotenoids on Cognitive Ability

Figure 1. Scientists strive to create wearable smart devices that can detect physiological phenomena in real time. According to a study from UC Berkeley, new ear devices can be 3D printed and used to indicate patients’ true body temperatures.

3D-Printed Ear Devices Detect Core Body Temperature

By Caleb Sooknanan ’20 Healthcare sensors are frequently used to detect skin temperature, but more research is needed to design a device that can pinpoint core body temperature levels and help doctors predict the likelihood of fever, fatigue, and other physiological phenomena. Professor Ali Javey and researchers at the University of California, Berkeley designed a printable smart device that — when placed on a patient’s … Continue reading 3D-Printed Ear Devices Detect Core Body Temperature