The Usage of Electromagnetic Waves as Water Sanitizers as Opposed to Traditional Methods of Water Sanitation

Kavindra Sahabir ‘21 One of the biggest challenges for animal breeding on farms is assuring the highest quality of the drinking water afforded to said animals. The goal is to prevent contamination from pathogens in order to ensure optimal animal health, and lower the risk disease. Currently, the system that most farms use is a physical method of filtration along with different chemical treatments. However, … Continue reading The Usage of Electromagnetic Waves as Water Sanitizers as Opposed to Traditional Methods of Water Sanitation

Consumption of Microplastics in the U.S.

Ellie Teng ‘21   Microplastics, formed from the degradation of larger plastics, are found in nearly all aspects of our lives. Microplastics are classified as being 5mm or less in size according to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration.While plastics can be widely used, they are not always properly and safely disposed of, and it is estimated that Americans inadvertently consume over 70,000 particles per … Continue reading Consumption of Microplastics in the U.S.

Formation of amino acids by abiotic means in the oceanic lithosphere

By Allan Mai ‘20 Experimental studies and thermodynamic calculations have shown that abiotic synthesis of amino acids and hydrocarbons – specifically during the hydrothermal alteration of mantle rocks – is theoretically possible. However, this phenomenon has only recently been demonstrated in a terrestrial setting. Benedicte Menez and his team at the Institut de Physique du Globe de Paris used high resolution imaging techniques to obtain … Continue reading Formation of amino acids by abiotic means in the oceanic lithosphere

Figure 1. Warming in places like Mount Kenya is steeper than current climate models predict.

High-Elevation Warming is Steeper than Previously Expected

By Megan Tan ’19 The Earth is warming at about two degrees annually at sea level. Though it is estimated that high-elevation warming occurs more steeply, it is difficult to measure due to environmental factors such as radiation and humidity which have made it challenging to accurately quantify past temperature changes. Shannon E. Loomis, a postdoctoral fellow at the Department of Earth, Environmental, and Planetary … Continue reading High-Elevation Warming is Steeper than Previously Expected

Climate Change Triggers Local Extinctions

    By Patrick Yang ‘20 Average annual temperatures worldwide have reached an approximate 1°C increase since 1880 – a shift hardly noticeable to humans, but a harbinger of biodiversity loss in plants and animals, especially in warmer regions. Past models have predicted 0% to >50% species loss due to future climate change. However, the extent of biodiversity loss is much harder to ascertain because … Continue reading Climate Change Triggers Local Extinctions

Mitigation in Sea Level Rise Due to Increased Snowfall

by Patrick Yang Many global climate models project that anthropogenic global warming will lead to increased snowfall in Antarctica due to increased moisture in the atmosphere. However, the actual trend in Antarctica shows a discrepancy. Surface mass balance (SMB), the difference between the amount of snow accumulated and sublimated, has not shown any significant increase, despite the rise in global temperature. This discrepancy may be … Continue reading Mitigation in Sea Level Rise Due to Increased Snowfall

A Baby’s Association of Food and Environment

    by Rideeta Raquib The dilemma of what to eat for dinner is a peculiar evolutionary trait that has enabled human beings to survive for centuries. Culture and our social surroundings are aspects that influence our species when it comes to our preference in food. A recent study from Dr. Zoe Liberman and her team at the University of Chicago has revealed that infants have … Continue reading A Baby’s Association of Food and Environment

The Removal of Coal Mine Contaminates

by Jenna Mallon (’18) Numerous abandoned coal mines exist throughout the US, many of which are consistently spewing toxic drainage, known as Acid Mine Drainage (AMD), into our waters. AMD leads to elevations in sulfuric acid, iron, aluminum, and manganese levels, which leads to extensive environmental damage. Scientists have struggled to find a cost-effective and efficient way of removing these substances. It has been hypothesized … Continue reading The Removal of Coal Mine Contaminates

The Effectiveness of Wildlife Conservation

by Jenna Mallon (’18) Numerous organizations, such as the World Wildlife Fund, exist in order to help protect and save our environment and the animals that live in it. As scientists gain a better understanding of our impact on the world, wildlife conservation has become a more pressing issue. Since scientists must act fast in order to save species and ensure their propagation into the … Continue reading The Effectiveness of Wildlife Conservation

The Cardiotoxic Effects of Oil on Fish Embryos

by Julia Newman (’19) Recent oil spills in the North Atlantic are currently causing detrimental effects not only on the water’s safety for humans, but also on the millions of fish species that live there. One species in particular, the Atlantic haddock, has shown a decreased survival correlated with the oil spills. This is a concern for both the ecosystems the fish are a part … Continue reading The Cardiotoxic Effects of Oil on Fish Embryos