The Future of 3D Printing in Biotechnology

Aditi Kaveti ‘23 Health technology has advanced tremendously, especially in the field of tissue engineering. Two main products that have resulted from tissue engineering are scaffolds and hydrogels, both being distinct physical forms of polymers for tissue engineered skin. To  enhance cell interaction with polymers, cells need to be present as integrated parts of the bioengineered tissue or host cells need to be recruited for … Continue reading The Future of 3D Printing in Biotechnology

The Relationship Between Dopamine and Development of Asthma

Aditi Kaveti ‘23 Asthma is a chronic condition in the United States that affects more than 26 million people, including an estimated 6 million children. Asthma is described as an intermittent inflammation and narrowing of the airways in the lungs, wheezing, chest tightness, shortness of breath, and coughing. Inflammation is regulated by the nervous system which is regulated by the immune system. Harvard researcher Xingbin … Continue reading The Relationship Between Dopamine and Development of Asthma

Cardiovascular Health Benefits to Dog Ownership

Aditi Kaveti ‘23 Loneliness and depression — in addition to a lack of physical activity — can increase the risks associated with health complications and premature death. Previous studies have demonstrated the links dog ownership has with increased physical activity, reduced social isolation, and lower blood pressure. A new study conducted by Professor Tove Fall at Uppsala University in Sweden suggested that dog ownership could … Continue reading Cardiovascular Health Benefits to Dog Ownership

The Potential for Targeted Cancer Therapy

Aditi Kaveti ‘23 Human bodies rely on tumor suppressors to regulate cell production. The bromodomain-containing protein 9 (BRD9) RNA molecule is an important tumor suppressor for many types of cancer, including uveal melanoma, chronic lymphocytic leukemia, and pancreatic cancer. BRD9 is extremely important because it represses abnormal cell reproduction and the formation of tumors. A mutation in the gene that produces the BRD9 RNA molecule … Continue reading The Potential for Targeted Cancer Therapy

Threatened mangrove forests can regenerate carbon stocks to defer climate change

Joyce Chen ’23 Shrimp is currently in high demand and is the most-consumed seafood in the United States. However, farming shrimp comes with a large sacrifice. Shrimp are found in shrimp ponds, which are converted from mangrove forests; these forests are known for sequestering, or storing, carbon, thereby delaying global warming. With the expansion of shrimp aquaculture, mangrove forests have depleted significantly, losing up to … Continue reading Threatened mangrove forests can regenerate carbon stocks to defer climate change

Depressive symptoms can lead to a false perception of ambiguity

Joyce Chen ‘23 Unlikely to experience optimism, many depressed individuals often times perceive ambiguity in a negative fashion. Their perception of reality is morphed by their emotions and they misunderstand other people’s intentions due to their subjective feelings. They have a negatively biased interpretation of the world, thereby leading to self-doubt and isolation. Thus, a depressed disposition can cause and worsen negative ambiguity processing.  A … Continue reading Depressive symptoms can lead to a false perception of ambiguity

Better sleep quality in college students leads to better performance in classes

Joyce Chen ‘23 College students are known for being sleep-deprived, sometimes sleeping for less than four hours a day or none at all. However, a lack of sleep can result in serious health consequences, such as a weakened immune system that makes people prone to illnesses. Recent research shows that sleep can improve concentration, energy, and mental and physical health in general.  To explore this … Continue reading Better sleep quality in college students leads to better performance in classes

Short-term relationships with violent men make women more prone to gender violence

Joyce Chen ‘23 Violence against women is a common occurence worldwide. In many countries, women are sexually abused or suffer from human trafficking. However, more research is needed to uncover the underlying factors that predispose women to such violence. Researchers under Lídia Puigvert utilized the ‘Free Teen Desire’ experimental project to study the link between females’ attractions to males and future gender violence as a … Continue reading Short-term relationships with violent men make women more prone to gender violence

The Relationship Between Inflammation and Mental Sluggishness

Ellie Teng ‘21 Mental sluggishness or ‘brain fog’ is often comorbid with inflammation, the body’s response to  an illness. Previous research has shown the negative impact of inflammation on the brain’s alert state. Although it is still unclear as to how inflammation impacts specific processes of the brain, a study conducted by researchers at the University of Birmingham evaluated the impact of mild acute inflammation … Continue reading The Relationship Between Inflammation and Mental Sluggishness

The Role of A Recently Discovered Protein in Obesity

Ellie Teng ‘21 Progesterone receptor membrane component 2 (PGRMC2) is a signaling protein found in various parts of the body including the uterus and liver. While it is highly expressed in fat tissue, it is also found in especially high levels in brown fat and is required for thermogenesis, the conversion of food into body heat. Researchers at the Scripps Research Institute took this knowledge … Continue reading The Role of A Recently Discovered Protein in Obesity