Loss of Sense of Smell Caused by COVID-19

Aditi Kaveti ‘23 The coronavirus pandemic has changed our lifestyles as we knew it. As we find ways to stay safe during the pandemic, research continues to bring us new information about COVID-19. One of the earliest and most commonly reported indicators of COVID-19 is the temporary loss of smell, or anosmia. Olfactory cells are the body’s smell nerve cells that are stimulated by the … Continue reading Loss of Sense of Smell Caused by COVID-19

The Impact of Patient Intellectual Disability on Organ Transplantation Candidacy

Gwenyth Mercep ’22 Disqualifying patients with intellectual disabilities (ID) from receiving organ transplantation is an unfortunate reality in healthcare. Compared with the evidence-based criteria used to determine transplant eligibility, the ID model has the potential to be discriminatory and subjective [1]. The use of ID in transplant candidacy may stem from perceived worse adherence and outcomes for patients with ID, concern of penalties to transplant … Continue reading The Impact of Patient Intellectual Disability on Organ Transplantation Candidacy

Localization, Authenticity, & Intersectionality – Ingredients to the Effective Implementation of Environmental Policies

Lauren Avilla, Grade 12 The key to unlocking success in environmental policy has always been guided by the singular concept of sustainability. It has proven the backbone of many federal environmental policies such as the Clean Water Act (CWA), Clean Air Act (CAA), and the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA). Conceptually, the practice of fulfilling the needs of now while simultaneously maintaining resources for the … Continue reading Localization, Authenticity, & Intersectionality – Ingredients to the Effective Implementation of Environmental Policies

Humanity and Technological Innovation

Jillian Martin, Grade 12 Continual innovation is crucial within the scope of engineering and the advancement of society as a whole. Innovative ideas have the potential to improve living standards, increase efficiency, and provide overwhelming opportunities to those it reaches. Whether it be indoor plumbing, electricity, vaccines, automobiles, or smartphones, technological innovation has shaped every industry and facet of life. However, all things come at … Continue reading Humanity and Technological Innovation

Mitigating Automated Discrimination

Dylan McCreesh, Grade 12 Humans are biased creatures. That’s a simple, historically irrefutable, unavoidable element of our nature. In making decisions, humankind is notoriously hindered by a variety of innate biases. Hard-baked into our psychology there are heuristic shortcuts, self-preference biases, and situationally homophilous or heterophilous tendencies which all alter our judgement and limit our capacity for unbiased decision-making. Moreover, for humans, decision-making is a … Continue reading Mitigating Automated Discrimination

Beyond the Dichotomy: A Systematic Approach to Administering Experimental Therapies

Yashita Chaudhary, Grade 12 The 2014-2016 Zaire Ebolavirus (EBOV) outbreak can be analyzed to understand how experimental therapies can be used in times of emergency, with a particular focus on virus outbreaks. The high early mortality rates of EBOV led to doctors being spread thin, and attention quickly turned to the possibility of using experimental therapies to treat patients. Tension rose between medical staff  who … Continue reading Beyond the Dichotomy: A Systematic Approach to Administering Experimental Therapies

Environmental Policies: Can They be Beneficial for the Environment at the Cost of Economic and Personal Freedom?

Angela Zhu, Grade 11 The past decade has been recorded as the warmest in history, with global temperatures reaching dangerous highs (1). Smog coats the skies of many cities around the world, and factories continue to burn fossil fuels, sending various greenhouse gases into the Earth’s atmosphere. To combat these devastating effects on the environment, governments globally have enacted environmental policies which seek to reduce … Continue reading Environmental Policies: Can They be Beneficial for the Environment at the Cost of Economic and Personal Freedom?

Bioremediation: Microorganisms and Eco-Friendly Decontamination

Sarah Ninan, Grade 11 Each year, thousands of technological advancements are made to further progress our nations socially and economically (1). In a constantly adapting world, there is a consistent demand for new and more appropriate technology to fit the shifting needs of the people (2). Still, the process of mass manufacturing fresh pieces of technology tends to have a negative impact on the environment … Continue reading Bioremediation: Microorganisms and Eco-Friendly Decontamination

Predictive Policing: Important Safeguards to Consider

Trevor Kim, Grade 11 The use of artificial intelligence (AI) has increasingly become critical to modern society. AI algorithms are frequently used to automate industrial processes, to streamline supply chains and to even set our oven timers. Intrigued by the efficacy of this technology, law enforcement agencies have invested heavily in developing AI to assist with policing. One emerging use has been in the field … Continue reading Predictive Policing: Important Safeguards to Consider

Unraveling the Ethics Behind Experimental Drugs

Aman Mistry, Grade 11 As the death toll due to COVID-19 increases, the ethical jumble surrounding experimental therapies becomes prevalent. Emergency situations such as the COVID-19 pandemic reassert the ongoing controversy surrounding the use of experimental drugs (2). Experimental drugs are preliminarily approved for clinical trials and can be alternatives to treat patients in times of crisis such as the COVID-19 pandemic or when suffering … Continue reading Unraveling the Ethics Behind Experimental Drugs

A Sustainable Future in Technological Advancement

Alice Shvartsberg, Grade 10 Technology and engineering have been behind our accomplishments since the beginning of mankind, and our world would not be as progressive as it is today without these advancements. Technology evolved as our needs and wants became more sophisticated, but the production of these improved technologies have drawbacks to them. Our Earth encounters environmental, health, and ethical issues from the mass production … Continue reading A Sustainable Future in Technological Advancement

The Questionable Validity of an FDA Approval

Leeya Azemoun, Grade 10 The Food and Drug Administration, commonly shortened to FDA, requires all medical and food products to be subject to their approval before being released on the market. This is, of course, necessary to ensure the safety of the general public who consume these products. However, there has been copious controversy over whether or not FDA approval is actually trustworthy. This concern … Continue reading The Questionable Validity of an FDA Approval