Money Matters: Investigating Neural Responses to Monetary and Social Feedback

Thumyat Noe ’23 Depression and social anxiety disorders are two of the most common psychopathologies in adults. One way to identify these disorders is by looking at event-related potentials (ERPs) which are measurable brain responses to stimuli. “Reward positivity” is an event-related potential that reflects neural positivity toward rewards and activation of a reinforcement learning system. Previous studies suggest that smaller reward positivity potentials correlate … Continue reading Money Matters: Investigating Neural Responses to Monetary and Social Feedback

Familial Economic Well-Being In Relation to Children’s Personal Development

Ishmam Khan ’25 According to the Federal Ministry for Family Affairs, Senior Citizens, Women and Youth, almost 20% of German children are part of a single-parent household or stepfamily. Previous research has shown the relationship between the “complexity” of a child’s family– specifically, the degree of deviance from a traditional nuclear family– and a child’s mental well-being. There has also been a scientifically noted connection … Continue reading Familial Economic Well-Being In Relation to Children’s Personal Development

High-Fat Diets in Combination With Triclosan Linked to Non-alcoholic Liver Disease

Daphne Siozios ’23 NAFLD, more commonly known as nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, is one of the most prominent chronic liver conditions in the country and is characterized by the accumulation of fat in hepatocytes (liver cells). A cousin of NAFLD, nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), is a condition that both encompasses the deposition of fat in the liver and inflammation of the organ. Fibroblast growth factor 21 … Continue reading High-Fat Diets in Combination With Triclosan Linked to Non-alcoholic Liver Disease

CaCl2-CaO Mixtures May Decrease Radioactivity Levels in Contaminated Nuclear Wastes

Thumyat Noe ’23 On March 11th, 2011, an earthquake in northeastern Japan caused leakage of radionuclides from the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power plant. Fukushima now stores the radioactive waste in designated locations, but there is an immediate need to decrease the radioactivity levels present in the stored wastes to prevent other accidents. Among the radionuclides present in contaminated wastes, scientists have determined radioactive cesium as … Continue reading CaCl2-CaO Mixtures May Decrease Radioactivity Levels in Contaminated Nuclear Wastes

Using Modified Guide Strands to Broaden Therapeutic Use of miRNAs for Breast Cancer

Ishmam Khan ’25 Triple-negative breast cancers (TNBCs) are a type of breast cancer that does not respond to traditional hormonal therapy. Despite TNBCs encompassing 10-20% of all breast cancers, TNBCs are significantly more aggressive than other breast cancers and have worse overall survival rates.  These cancers often offer patients a poor prognosis due to their high rates of proliferation and chemoresistance. A research group at … Continue reading Using Modified Guide Strands to Broaden Therapeutic Use of miRNAs for Breast Cancer

The Role of Indoor Air Microbiomes on Lung Health and Asthma

Alex Moir ’23 Asthma is a chronic inflammatory disease affecting the lungs that can vary in severity and symptoms, usually characterized by difficulty breathing and periodic lung spasms referred to as asthma “attacks.” The direct cause of asthma is unclear; however, recent research has pointed to the human lung myco- and microbiomes as contributing factors. The mycobiome refers to the community of fungi in the … Continue reading The Role of Indoor Air Microbiomes on Lung Health and Asthma

Building a Better Battery: An Alternative to Lithium Ion Batteries

Robyn Rutgers ’24 Due to the negative effects of nonrenewable energy, scientists and environmentalists are trying to shift to cleaner energy sources, such as wind and solar power. One obstacle that engineers face in designing clean-energy solutions is the inefficiency of storing the generated energy, often resulting in large amounts of wasted energy. However, the development of advanced batteries would allow for more efficient storage … Continue reading Building a Better Battery: An Alternative to Lithium Ion Batteries

A New Potential Vaccine Candidate for Staphylococcus aureus

Alex Moir ’23 Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) is a bacterium often found in both skin and the upper respiratory tract. Despite its native status in the human body, S. aureus can also act as an opportunistic pathogen in immunocompromised hosts. Efforts to create an effective S. aureus vaccine have so far proven unsuccessful due to the diverse array of immunoevasive strategies S. aureus employs. Specifically, … Continue reading A New Potential Vaccine Candidate for Staphylococcus aureus

Pandemic-related Stress Overwhelms Pregnant Women Globally

Joyce Chen ’23 Within the past year, the onset and duration of the pandemic has wreaked havoc on the world. Aside from the detrimental effects on physical health, the virus has taken a significant impact on mental wellbeing. Many pregnant women have reported feeling heightened levels of stress at this time because they do not feel prepared to give birth and are afraid of their … Continue reading Pandemic-related Stress Overwhelms Pregnant Women Globally

Can We Control Our Dopamine?

Aditi Kaveti ’23 Dopamine is a notorious molecule, with effects ranging from heightened sense of happiness and increased energy, to anxiety and difficulty sleeping. It is involved in cognitive processing related to reward and pleasure. Research into this molecule offers a wide range of study as scientists attempt to understand the dynamics and neuromodulation that occurs in the brain. Conrad Foo, a graduate student at … Continue reading Can We Control Our Dopamine?

Presence of Social Supports Counteracts Physical Brain Changes Associated with Dementia

Vignesh Subramanian ’24 Alzheimer’s disease and related disorders (ADRD) are neurodegenerative dementias that cause progressive loss of memory, critical thinking skills, and behavioral capabilities that typically worsen with age. However, certain older adults with significant degrees of ADRD-associated pathologies are not as vulnerable to the age- or disease-related physical changes in the brain that precede the development of dementia. These adults are classified as “cognitively … Continue reading Presence of Social Supports Counteracts Physical Brain Changes Associated with Dementia

Predicting Externalizing Behavior in Infants

Yukta Kulkarni ’22 The minds of children are malleable and easily influenced by the circumstances they are placed into. Their experiences in early life can elicit certain actions according to the emotions they may not be able to process and control. This can be defined as externalizing behavior. More often than not, children who face trauma or stress such as abuse or poverty have higher … Continue reading Predicting Externalizing Behavior in Infants