Engineered T-cells as a Target for Fibrosis in Myocardial Disease

Simran Kaur ‘20 Fibrosis, the excessive deposition of extracellular matrix by fibroblasts into cardiac tissue, is a significant process in the development of cardiac disease and subsequent cardiac failure, but there are not many clinical treatments that can effectively target it. Cardiac fibroblasts express an antigen that can be targeted by the transplantation of antigen-specific CD8+ T-cells because CD8+ T-cells are involved in the inflammatory … Continue reading Engineered T-cells as a Target for Fibrosis in Myocardial Disease

CRISPR-Edited Stem Cells as a Potential Therapeutic Target for Cancer in Immunocompromised Individuals

Simran Kaur ‘20 CRISPR-Cas9 technology has been used to edit the mammalian genome for decades, allowing scientists to remove, add, and change sections of DNA sequences. The human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) does not have a cure that exists, but studies have shown that allogeneic transplantation of STEM cells into diagnosed patients can eradicate the virus. CCR5 is the coreceptor for the entry of HIV into … Continue reading CRISPR-Edited Stem Cells as a Potential Therapeutic Target for Cancer in Immunocompromised Individuals

The Potential for Targeted Cancer Therapy

Aditi Kaveti ‘23 Human bodies rely on tumor suppressors to regulate cell production. The bromodomain-containing protein 9 (BRD9) RNA molecule is an important tumor suppressor for many types of cancer, including uveal melanoma, chronic lymphocytic leukemia, and pancreatic cancer. BRD9 is extremely important because it represses abnormal cell reproduction and the formation of tumors. A mutation in the gene that produces the BRD9 RNA molecule … Continue reading The Potential for Targeted Cancer Therapy

Growth Factor Induces Methylation Changes in Lung Fibroblasts

Priyanshi Patel ’22 Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis (IPF) is an irreversible, chronic, and lethal disease of unknown etiology. IPF is characterized by excessive deposition of extracellular matrix (ECM), which is secreted mainly by activated fibroblasts under certain stimuli. Recent studies have evaluated alterations with DNA methylation as a collective driver of IPF. Few studies explore global DNA methylation in lung fibrosis, but none focused on transforming … Continue reading Growth Factor Induces Methylation Changes in Lung Fibroblasts

Essential Role of the MEKK3-ERK5 Module in Endothelial Cell Death

Jorge Pincay ’20 Atherosclerosis is a chronic inflammatory disease characterized by the build-up of plaque in artery walls, which can lead to coronary artery disease, heart failure, and stroke. Since atherosclerosis results from endothelial cell injury and death, researchers are making greater efforts to acquire a better understanding of the cellular mechanisms that may lead to these unfavorable changes in endothelial cells. In particular, the … Continue reading Essential Role of the MEKK3-ERK5 Module in Endothelial Cell Death

Tfh13: The Cells Involved In An Allergic Reaction

Mariam Malik ’22 Anaphylaxis is the biological reaction of the body to an allergy, in which airways are constricted and blood pressure suddenly drops. Anaphylactic shock can result from various allergies, including food and insect stings. Previous research has shown that during an allergic reaction, the immune system releases high levels of high-affinity Immunoglobin (IgE) antibodies, which then strongly bind to allergens to form an … Continue reading Tfh13: The Cells Involved In An Allergic Reaction

The Genetic Role of Left-Handedness

Ellie Teng ’21 90% of the population are right- handed, so what is different about individuals who are left- handed? Handedness was previously known to be partially affected by the genome; twin studies showed that genes account for about 25% of the variation in handedness. Researchers at the University of Oxford sought to connect the genetic difference to areas of the brain that control language. … Continue reading The Genetic Role of Left-Handedness

The Use of Focused Ultrasound for Enhanced Delivery of Gene Therapy Across the Blood-Brain-Barrier

Jorge Pincay ‘20 Huntington’s disease (HD) is an autosomal dominant neurodegenerative disease that results in the degradation of nerve cells in the brain over time. This disease is the result of a DNA mutation — a cytosine-adenine-guanine (CAG) trinucleotide repeat expansion– that occurs in the gene that encodes for the huntingtin (Htt) protein. This repeat expansion causes a highly toxic form of the Htt protein … Continue reading The Use of Focused Ultrasound for Enhanced Delivery of Gene Therapy Across the Blood-Brain-Barrier

Enhanced mRNA Gene Therapy for Critical Limb Ischemia

Jorge Pincay ‘20 Critical limb ischemia (CLI) is a cardiovascular condition characterized by severely narrowed arteries resulting from the buildup of plaque. This narrowing of the arteries  significantly reduces blood flow to the hands, feet, and legs and may lead to amputation of the affected limbs. Most patients suffering from CLI need to undergo some form of a revascularization procedure in order to combat this … Continue reading Enhanced mRNA Gene Therapy for Critical Limb Ischemia

Glutamate Receptor GLR-3 Encodes for Evolutionary Cold-Sensing Receptor

Simran Kaur ’20 The capacity to detect cold temperatures is essential for many living organisms because cold temperatures can cause detrimental effects like severe soft-tissue damage and hypothermia. Some organisms have evolved the presence of thermoreceptors, which are specific nerve endings that are sensitive to changes in temperature and exist in the skin, skeletal muscle, and the hypothalamus. Thermoreceptors relay electrical signals to the central … Continue reading Glutamate Receptor GLR-3 Encodes for Evolutionary Cold-Sensing Receptor