Distinct Fibroblast Subsets Drive Inflammation and Damage in Arthritis

By Nicole Zhao ‘20  Arthritis is an inflammation of one or more joints with symptoms such as joint pain and stiffness (1). One common type of arthritis is rheumatoid arthritis, an inflammatory disease in which the immune system targets the synovial membrane of the joints and causes joint damage (1). The synovial membrane normally protects and lubricates the joints. Previous studies have found that the … Continue reading Distinct Fibroblast Subsets Drive Inflammation and Damage in Arthritis

Exercise and Longevity in Women

By Mariam Malik ‘22 Daily exercise has been proven to significantly reduce stress and increase happiness and longevity. It has been assumed that 10,000 steps per day were needed to feel these boosts in dopamine and energy, but a recent study published in JAMA Internal Medicine provides experimental evidence that the recommended number of steps to feel the positive effects of walking is actually fewer … Continue reading Exercise and Longevity in Women

The Link Between Autism and The GI Tract

By Mariam Malik ‘22 Autism is the most rapidly rising developmental disability across the globe and approximately 90% of people affected experience gut-related issues with no obvious connection. But researchers at RMIT University in Australia have found equal gene mutations in both the gut and the brain that could explain this phenomenon in those with autism.  It has been previously discovered that a specific gene … Continue reading The Link Between Autism and The GI Tract

Researchers Discover Sub-Neptune Sized Planet

By Mariam Malik ‘22 A planet is a celestial body that rotates around a star in an elliptical orbit. Separate from fixed stars, each planet has its own unique motion. New and combined research from multiple universities around the world shows the discovery of a new planet, NGTS-4b, which is smaller than Neptune but found in an area where most Neptune-like planets are not found, … Continue reading Researchers Discover Sub-Neptune Sized Planet

The Effect of Different Herbal Extracts on the Potential Prevention of Neurodegenerative Diseases

Kavindra Sahabir ‘21 An estimated 24 million people worldwide are suffering from neurodegenerative diseases such as Parkinson’s and Alzheimer’s disease. A major causative factor in the onset and progression of these diseases is the formation of misformed alpha-synuclein proteins, which aggregate and cause major problems in the nervous system. Thus, in developing strategies to combat these diseases, researchers must look for ways to block the … Continue reading The Effect of Different Herbal Extracts on the Potential Prevention of Neurodegenerative Diseases

Oral Health May Affect Alzheimer’s Disease

Ellie Teng ‘21 Alzheimer’s disease is a condition that affects millions per year by destroying and reducing mental functions. Dementia, the loss of memory, is a common symptom of this disease. Recent studies have shown a surprising connection between Alzhemer’s and maintaining good oral hygiene. Scientists at the University of Bergen have determined gum disease to be a factor in the development of Alzheimer’s in … Continue reading Oral Health May Affect Alzheimer’s Disease

Consumption of Microplastics in the U.S.

Ellie Teng ‘21   Microplastics, formed from the degradation of larger plastics, are found in nearly all aspects of our lives. Microplastics are classified as being 5mm or less in size according to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration.While plastics can be widely used, they are not always properly and safely disposed of, and it is estimated that Americans inadvertently consume over 70,000 particles per … Continue reading Consumption of Microplastics in the U.S.

Global Warming Could Allow Squid to Thrive

Ellie Teng ‘21 The unique swimming technique of squid requires energy and oxygen. Jet propulsion allows the cephalopods to rapidly move about, but requires a large output of energy, thereby increasing the demand for oxygen. There is evidence suggesting increased CO2 has adverse effects on squid respiratory performance, however, there has been no research on the effects of prolonged exposure to CO2 for adult cephalopods. … Continue reading Global Warming Could Allow Squid to Thrive

Optimizing Treatment for Diabetic Patients With Coronary Artery Disease

By Allan Mai ‘20 There are currently 415 million people worldwide living with diabetes; this number is expected to rise to 640 million by the year 2040. Complications, especially coronary artery disease (CAD), is one of the leading causes of death in diabetic patients; conversely, optimizing management of such complications can also significantly increase lifespan. While the previous assumption was that good glycemic control would … Continue reading Optimizing Treatment for Diabetic Patients With Coronary Artery Disease

Yeast and the Biosynthesis of Cannabinoids

By Allan Mai ‘20 Scientists have recently been exploring routes to biosynthesize cannabinoids by introducing a series of genes into yeast cells. Using the simple sugar galactose, Dr. Xiaozhou Luo and his team at the University of California at Berkeley successfully devised a pathway to produce major cannabinoids such as cannabigerolic acid and cannabidiolic acid among others. The biosynthesis of such compounds would allow for … Continue reading Yeast and the Biosynthesis of Cannabinoids