How Mosquitoes Find Their Next Meal

Ellie Teng ‘21 Getting a mosquito bite is common during warmer weather, however in certain places, it could be deadly, as mosquitoes are major transmitters of disease. Bloodborne pathogens are easily transferred between humans. To determine how a female mosquito identifies, tracks and prey on a potential host, a group of scientists from the University of Washington studied the two sensory systems in mosquitoes: the … Continue reading How Mosquitoes Find Their Next Meal

Why the Highveld Mole Rat Does Not Sense Pain

By Nicole Zhao ‘20  Plants and insects alike often use algogens, noxious substances, as defensive weapons against predators (1). Predators, such as humans, detect these algogens via the receptors of nociceptive sensory neurons and are warned to back off(2). It has previously been shown that Heterocephalus glaber, otherwise known as the naked mole rat, shows no pain behavior when exposed to hydrogen chloride and capsaicin, … Continue reading Why the Highveld Mole Rat Does Not Sense Pain

Use of Arithmetic operations and Memory Processing Shown in Bees

By Mariam Malik ‘22 Some animals are mentally capable of understanding the concept of numbers, emotion, and even language. However, at RMIT University in Australia, an experiment done on bees shows that they are not only able to understand the concept of numbers, but they also show comprehension of arithmetic operations, such as addition and subtraction, with the use of colored symbols. To determine if … Continue reading Use of Arithmetic operations and Memory Processing Shown in Bees