Clinical study confirms another benefit of eating crickets

By Nita Wong ‘21 While crickets are not a staple in the average American diet, more than 2 billion people around the world regularly consume insects, which are known to be rich in protein, vitamins, minerals, and healthy fats. A recent study conducted at the University of Wisconsin-Madison Nelson Institute for Environmental Studies and published in the journal Scientific Reports is adding the increased growth … Continue reading Clinical study confirms another benefit of eating crickets

New study links consumption of soy to decreased risk of osteoporosis

By Nita Wong ‘21 Previous research has demonstrated a direct relationship between the lack of estrogen during menopause and postmenopause and the development of osteoporosis, a bone disease that results from an imbalance between the formation of new bone and the resorption of old bone. A recent study conducted at the University of Missouri suggests that an increased dietary intake of soy may be capable … Continue reading New study links consumption of soy to decreased risk of osteoporosis

Dietary carbohydrates linked to osteoarthritis

By Nita Wong ‘21 Osteoarthritis (OA), the most widespread form of arthritis and disability in the United States, affects an estimated 27 million Americans. A condition that occurs due to the breakdown of the cartilage that cushions bones in joints – resulting in the bones rubbing against each other – OA most commonly affects joints in the hands, knees, hips, and spine. Several factors can … Continue reading Dietary carbohydrates linked to osteoarthritis

New Technology Optimizes Process for T-Cell Therapy

Rachel Kogan ‘19 T-Cells are cells involved in a particular form of immunity known as the cell-mediated immune response. The cell-mediate immune response does not utilize antibodies, or proteins that bind to and flag foreign substances as dangerous, and instead signals other cells to either engulf of attack these invaders. Typically, T-cells have been used therapeutically to treat certain forms of cancers as well as … Continue reading New Technology Optimizes Process for T-Cell Therapy

Novel Structural Details of Opioid Receptor Identified

Rachel Kogan ‘19 Opioid addiction has been on the rise for decades across the nation. Often times, these addictions are spurred by an initial pain medication prescription administered by health professionals. As a result, the health care field finds itself at a crossroads between administering the medication to aid individuals in living a pain-free life and potentially propagating addictive behaviors. Most pain medications affect the … Continue reading Novel Structural Details of Opioid Receptor Identified

Invasive Hogweed Spreads Throughout North East

Rachel Kogan ‘19 Many plant species that are accidentally transported from one continent to the other by humans become invasive species. The Giant Hogweed, Heracleum mantegazzianum,is one such species. The plant, originally found in the Caucasus Mountains in central Asia, has recently spread throughout Canada and the United States’ Northeastern region. Recently, scientists discovered the hogweed in Virginia, following reports of unusual burns associated with … Continue reading Invasive Hogweed Spreads Throughout North East

Lymphatic Vessels Can Improve Cognition Relative to Age

Caleb Sooknanan ‘20 Aging is often associated with increased neurological problems among humans, and more research is needed to understand how lymphatic vessels connecting the brain and the immune system affect conditions such as Alzheimer’s disease. Doctor Jonathan Kipnis and researchers from the University of Virginia enhanced the lymphatic vessels of aging mice and significantly improved their abilities to learn and retain memory. The researchers … Continue reading Lymphatic Vessels Can Improve Cognition Relative to Age

Observing Silver Nanoparticles in Real Time

Caleb Sooknanan ‘20 Silver nanoparticle systems are commonly used in medical treatments, food, and sports products for their antibacterial and anti-inflammatory properties; however, more research is needed to understand how such nanoparticles react in biological systems. Doctor Kristina Tschulik and researchers from Ruhr-University Bochum in Germany used a novel combination of electrochemical and spectroscopic methods to observe silver nanoparticle behavior in real time. With these … Continue reading Observing Silver Nanoparticles in Real Time

Experimental Drugs May Reverse Skin and Hair Conditions

Caleb Sooknanan ‘20 Glycosphingolipids or GSLs are specific biomolecules that function within cell membranes to regulate signal transmission and cell-to-cell recognition, but more research is needed to understand their properties. For example, scientists are trying to understand the relationship between GSL consumption and phenotypes associated with an organism’s skin and hair. In a study performed at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine in Maryland, doctor … Continue reading Experimental Drugs May Reverse Skin and Hair Conditions

Cell Phone Use May Have Negative Consequences

Samara Khan ‘19 According to a recent study by the PEW Research Center, 78 percent of Americans aged 12 to 17 have cell phones. The majority of these individuals spend about 4 to 6 hours on their phones each day. This increased time on cell phones means more exposure to radiofrequency electromagnetic fields, or RT-EMF. Although there have been several studies that have aimed to … Continue reading Cell Phone Use May Have Negative Consequences