Further Into the Atom with Ultrafast Light

Neomi Lewis ‘21 A great deal of modern atomic physics seeks to plumb the hidden depths of the atom, particularly the dynamics of inner-shell electrons about which not much is known. Attosecond, or 1×10-18 of a second, laser technology used by the Laboratory for Attosecond Physics, run by both LMU Munich and the Max Planck Institute of Quantum Optics, has recently been able to create … Continue reading Further Into the Atom with Ultrafast Light

Energy, Spin, and Charge All in One

Neomi Lewis ‘21 The field of economics is constantly making strides to better manipulate and strategically implement properties of charged particles. Charged particles play instrumental roles in devising electronic devices. Most particles that are commonly used, however, only retain one property that can be manipulated. Researchers from Duke University now have reason to believe that “trions,” a quasiparticle, can also be controlled in useful ways. … Continue reading Energy, Spin, and Charge All in One

Figure 1. Researchers from Arizona State University found conductive properties in human integrin protein using Scanning Tunnel Microscopy. The image depicts this technique with a single strand of DNA.

Finding Conductive Proteins Using Scanning Tunnel Microscopy

By Meghan Bialt-DeCelie ’19 Single molecule detection techniques are used to understand the behaviors of a specific biological molecule and have applications in medical and pharmacological research. This can be critical for understanding how an individual biological molecule, such as a specific protein, functions, as well as its role in a biological pathway. Researchers led by Stuart Lindsay, PhD from Arizona State University found high … Continue reading Finding Conductive Proteins Using Scanning Tunnel Microscopy

Figure 1. Researchers from the Brookhaven National Laboratory developed a scalable process to reduce glare on typically reflective glass surfaces.

Using Nanotechnology to Reduce Glare on Screens

By Meghan Bialt-DeCelie ‘19 Displays of all commonly used electronics such as smartphones, televisions, and laptops all suffer from glare on their glass surfaces. Glass and clear plastics are transparent, but they are still visible due to a small amount of reflection of light caused by the difference between the refractive index of the surface and the rest of the material. Antireflective coating and screens … Continue reading Using Nanotechnology to Reduce Glare on Screens

Asteroids May Have Fostered Life on Mars

By Julia Newman Fig 1: Analysis of Mars’ surface shows a history of bombardment.   Ever since the official announcement of water on Mars just last September, the search for habitable conditions on the planet has been more intense than ever. Studies from earlier this week suggest that while Earth’s surface is affected mostly by erosion and plate tectonics, Mars has been subjected to billions of … Continue reading Asteroids May Have Fostered Life on Mars

Factors affecting disaster preparedness in tsunami-prone areas

By Shannon Bohman ’19 Following the 2012 Indian Ocean earthquakes, Dr. Witvorapong and his colleagues surveyed 557 households in tsunami-prone areas of Phang Nga, Thailand. They focused on the relationship between social participation and disaster risk reduction actions, such as stockpiling supplies, making family emergency plans, and promoting risk reduction actions via community involvement. To analyze the data, the scientists employed a multivariate probit model. … Continue reading Factors affecting disaster preparedness in tsunami-prone areas

Confirmation of Quantum Mechanics

By Shannon Bohman Image acquired from commons.wikipedia.org Figure 1 This picture shows the physics building at Delft University of Technology in the Netherlands.   Netherland scientists of Delft University of Technology claimed to have proven quantum entanglement, the idea that if two particles’ spins are aligned, they can still influence each other at all times, no matter the distance between them. Two diamonds, each containing … Continue reading Confirmation of Quantum Mechanics