Brain Cancer and SENP1Silencing

By Daniel Walocha ‘19 Astrocytomas are the most common type of glioma and contain the most detrimental subtype of brain cancers, glioblastoma multiforme. Astrocytomas affect the astrocytes in the brain, which make up the blood-brain barrier. Xia et al. from Purdue University looked to study the effect of SUMO-specific protease 1 (SENP1) knockout in cell lines derived from astrocytoma patients. SENP1 was previously found to … Continue reading Brain Cancer and SENP1Silencing

TIGAR Protein Associated Survival in Viral Carcinogenesis

By Daniel Walocha ‘19 Oncogene overexpression will lead to cancer phenotypes that can accumulate cytotoxic metabolites, reactive oxygen species (ROS), and other apoptosis-inducing factors in the cell. It is therefore necessary for the cancerous cell to eliminate the apoptosis-inducing factors or suppress apoptosis altogether. Dr. Megan Romeo et al. from Richland College has detected a mechanism in which a cooperative pathway utilizes a cellular protein … Continue reading TIGAR Protein Associated Survival in Viral Carcinogenesis

Intelligence in the HTT Gene

By Daniel Walocha ‘19 Huntington’s Disease is caused by a trinucleotide repeat of the HTT gene. The wild type has a repeat ranging from 10 to 35, but beyond 39 repeats causes the disease characterized by significant impairments in the basal ganglia and neurodegeneration. The CAG repeats in the HTT gene cause the production of an abnormally long Huntington protein, which impairs the function of … Continue reading Intelligence in the HTT Gene

Long Non-Coding RNA NEAT1 Analysis

By Daniel Walocha ‘19 Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) serve normal cell functions in growth, differentiation, and controlled cell death. The lncRNA’s are modulated in cancer cells to provide a pro-survival, oncogenic role in many different types of cancer. However, lncRNA’s have also been seen, when unchanged, to provide tumor suppressive activities in normal cells. Nuclear paraspeckle assembly transcript 1 (NEAT 1) is a lncRNA that … Continue reading Long Non-Coding RNA NEAT1 Analysis

CD133’s Role in Esophageal Cancer Cells

By Daniel Walocha ‘19 CD133 is a biomarker for cancer stem cells (CSC) in esophageal squamous cell carcinomas (ESCC). Cancer cells have remarkable resistance to drugs and therapies, so discovering a potential therapeutic target to make the CSCs in ESCC more susceptible to treatment is of particular interest. Dr. Wen Xu et al. from Columbia University looked to elucidate the pathway for CD133 and associated … Continue reading CD133’s Role in Esophageal Cancer Cells

What SIV can Teach us About HIV’s March Throughout the Body

By Matthew Lee ‘21 Ever since it made a global impact in the 1980s, HIV has increasingly become one of the world’s most studied diseases. However, the exact mechanisms that underlie vertical HIV-1 transmission have yet to be fully understood. A research team led by Dr. Angela M. Amedee of Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center sought to investigate the early stages of HIV pathogenesis … Continue reading What SIV can Teach us About HIV’s March Throughout the Body

Odor from a Rotten Egg Could Combat Hyperglycemia

By Matthew Lee ‘21 Modern industrialized countries are plagued by diseases that usually manifest their worst symptoms after many years. One such condition is hyperglycemia, in which high blood glucose may lead to diabetes and/or atherosclerosis. Jiaqiong Lin of Guangdong General Hospital and a team of researchers investigated how hydrogen sulfide (H2S) could protect human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) against injury from high glucose. … Continue reading Odor from a Rotten Egg Could Combat Hyperglycemia

Cellular regulation of tumorigenesis

By Matthew Lee ‘21 Scientists and students alike are often well aware that one of the immune system’s most important roles is fighting cancer. In this effort, dendritic cells are especially important; particularly important are conventional type 1 dendritic cells (cDC1). Dendritic cells are a type of immune cell. cDCs can present tumor antigens to T cells and attract T cells via the secretion of … Continue reading Cellular regulation of tumorigenesis

EYA1 and its Overexpression in Colorectal Cancer Associated with Angiogenesis

By Daniel Walocha ‘19 Angiogenesis is the formation of blood vessels. Cancer cells release growth factors associated with the induction of angiogenesis. Newly formed blood vessels allow cancer cells to easily metastasize, making treatment and survivability difficult for tumors. Colorectal cells are the third leading cause of cancer deaths, so understanding potential therapeutic targets is of interest to researchers. Shaoxin Cai, Ph.D, from Tongji Hospital … Continue reading EYA1 and its Overexpression in Colorectal Cancer Associated with Angiogenesis

TRIM25 and its Role in the Proliferation of Colorectal Cancer Cells

By Daniel Walocha ‘19 Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third leading cause of cancer death. Metastasis is one of the largest determinants of survival for colorectal cancer; treatment before metastasis is crucial for survival. Targeting potential gene products that promote proliferation and invasion could reduce cancer metastasis and growth. TRIM25 is an E3 ubiquitin ligase found to be responsible for the polyubiquitination of retinoic acid … Continue reading TRIM25 and its Role in the Proliferation of Colorectal Cancer Cells