The Unlikely Relation Between Gut and Brain

By Allan Mai ‘20 With the high selectivity of the blood-brain barrier, it appears unlikely that microorganisms in the stomach could ever be able to reach the brain. However, past studies that have suggested major correlation between depression and specific gut bacteria and even correlation between social behavior and the activities of certain gut bacteria have sparked intense research regarding the “gut-brain” axis. Among these … Continue reading The Unlikely Relation Between Gut and Brain

Different Gut Microbiota for Patients with Hepatocellular Carcinoma

By Natalie Lo ‘21 Hepatocellular Carcinoma (HCC) is a common form of liver cancer and is possibly related to an infection of hepatitis B virus (HBV) since it can result in cancer formation through activation of oncogenic proteins, inflammation, and cirrhosis. Through a symbiotic relationship, microorganisms in the gut interact with organs in humans, such as the liver, and play an important role in nutrition … Continue reading Different Gut Microbiota for Patients with Hepatocellular Carcinoma

Synergistic Products May Possibly Aid Bacterial Survival

By Fatin Chowdhury ‘19 In an introductory microbiology course, students may learn about bacterial synergy. When bacteria synergistically infect a host through a biofilm, for example, different strains work in conjunction with one another, amplifying their effects. Researchers in Germany, led by Dr. Johannes Arp, recently explored the synergetic tendencies of products from a strain of Pseudomonas bacteria designated as QS1027, which in environmental samples … Continue reading Synergistic Products May Possibly Aid Bacterial Survival

Figure 1. Researchers from Arizona State University found conductive properties in human integrin protein using Scanning Tunnel Microscopy. The image depicts this technique with a single strand of DNA.

Finding Conductive Proteins Using Scanning Tunnel Microscopy

By Meghan Bialt-DeCelie ’19 Single molecule detection techniques are used to understand the behaviors of a specific biological molecule and have applications in medical and pharmacological research. This can be critical for understanding how an individual biological molecule, such as a specific protein, functions, as well as its role in a biological pathway. Researchers led by Stuart Lindsay, PhD from Arizona State University found high … Continue reading Finding Conductive Proteins Using Scanning Tunnel Microscopy