Figure 1. Researchers found that it is possible for speciation to occur in finches in the Galapagos Islands within a couple of generations.

New Species of Finch Developed After Three Generations

By Meghan Bialt-DeCelie ‘19 Darwin’s finches from the Galapagos Islands are one of the hallmarks of the scientific field of evolution studies. Species classification between two organisms is determined by the ability to successfully reproduce a nonsterile progeny. Several factors such as physical, behavioral, and biological differences can cause reproductive isolation, or prevention of two organisms from reproducing. Reproductive isolation can cause speciation, or the … Continue reading New Species of Finch Developed After Three Generations

New Strain of Infectious Cancer Found in Sarcophilus Harrisii

By Karis Tutuska ’18 Cancer is a scary word, but what is even more frightening is the concept of a contagious cancer. Sarcophilus harrisii, commonly known as Tasmanian devils, are large carnivorous marsupials, savage screechers, and voracious eaters. These organisms are plagued by deadly, fast-acting facial tumors that grow until they prevent the animal from eating and force starvation until death. What is unusual about these … Continue reading New Strain of Infectious Cancer Found in Sarcophilus Harrisii

Mysterious Die-Off of Saigas in Central Asia

By Shannon Bohman Image acquired from commons.wikipedia.org Figure 1 This picture shows a mother and child saiga in their native Central Asian Steppes.   This past May, the corpses of hundreds of saiga antelopes were found scattered across the Central Asian Steppes. This endangered species had been under close watch due to significant overhunting. Conservationists succeeded in replenishing the population, but over half of the … Continue reading Mysterious Die-Off of Saigas in Central Asia

Ecology of Zoonotic Transmissions: The Impact of Bos taurus indicus Fertilizer on the Health of Malagasy Farmers

Photo Courtesy of Rachel Lordahl By Zuri S. Dawkins Central ValBio Ranomafana National Park, Madagascar Undergraduate Program in Anthropology and Biology, Stony Brook University Madagascar Institute for the Conservation of Tropical Environments (MICET) Contact Info: Zuri.Dawkins@stonybrook.edu ABSTRACT Emerging infectious diseases in livestock pose a huge threat to human health, animal efficiency and biodiversity. Zoonotic diseases are highly contagious diseases that spread amongst animals and humans via … Continue reading Ecology of Zoonotic Transmissions: The Impact of Bos taurus indicus Fertilizer on the Health of Malagasy Farmers