Potential for Macrophage Cell Cultures to Produce New Medications

Julia Chivu ’23 Macrophages typically dominate the immune system with broad responsibilities related to cell repair, immune response, and homeostasis. However, macrophages also have organ-specific functions embedded into their epigenetic makeup. These powerful and specialized cells may be used in various macrophage therapies that can impact both humans and animals. In spite of this astounding potential, these treatment options are not available yet since scientists … Continue reading Potential for Macrophage Cell Cultures to Produce New Medications

Intrinsic Biases in Maternal EEG/ERP Research Undermine Racial Representation

Vignesh Subramanian ’24 The use of electroencephalography (EEG) and event-related potentials (ERPs) – two methods of recording brain waves to measure continuous and stimulus-based electrical activity, respectively – is most common in the diagnosis of brain disorders. However, EEG/ERP methodology is also used to monitor the timing of cognitive functions during periods of stress or development. EEG’s high temporal resolution allows for the observation of … Continue reading Intrinsic Biases in Maternal EEG/ERP Research Undermine Racial Representation

Reductions in Complete Rat Serum Yields Promising Results in Whole Embryo Culture

Nomrota Majumder ‘21 Whole Embryo Culture (WEC) came about in the 1950s as a way to observe patterns in mammalian development, investigate birth defects, and analyze explanted organogenesis-stage rodent embryos. Since then, it has been a very treasured technique in biological research methods. Since WEC is conducted in vitro, a serum properly suited for an embryo is crucial to the process, and ever since its … Continue reading Reductions in Complete Rat Serum Yields Promising Results in Whole Embryo Culture

Biological and Cultural Co-Evolution: The Takeover of Specialists

By Maryna Mullerman ‘20 A conventional view that humans acquired language skills solely through biological evolution was challenged by Bart de Boer and Bill Thompson, researchers from the Max Planck Institute for Psycholinguistics in the Netherlands. Their study proposed a mathematical model in which biology and culture played important roles in language acquisition within finite populations. This alternative view argued that biological adaptation changes varied … Continue reading Biological and Cultural Co-Evolution: The Takeover of Specialists