Developing Genetic Tools for Eukaryotic Marine Microbes

Gaurav Sharma ’22 Sea life may hold one of the most diverse microbial ecosystems since we have not yet uncovered all of the mysteries and organisms teeming among the depths. Among the microbes that have been studied are eukaryotic microbes which range in diversity. When it comes to studying these organisms, researchers are presented with a challenge and can only genetically study some of these … Continue reading Developing Genetic Tools for Eukaryotic Marine Microbes

Novel Method Helps Reveal Prognosis of Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

Gaurav Sharma ’22 For the past couple of years, lung cancer has been responsible for the most cancer-related deaths in the general population. One variation of lung cancer is non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) which constitutes more than 80% of tumor growths originating in the lungs. NSCLC can be treated but 40% of patients have a recurrence of NSCLC highlighting the critical need for a … Continue reading Novel Method Helps Reveal Prognosis of Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

Live Imaging of Cell Cycle State in Metazoa

Gaurav Sharma ’22 An important part of development of any organism is differential regulation of the cell cycle since it leads to cell specification and differentiation. The cell cycle states and their coordination are already well-studied, but the mechanistic connection between the cell cycle and differentiated cell behavior is still to be determined. The challenge is finding a reliable live cell imaging tool that can … Continue reading Live Imaging of Cell Cycle State in Metazoa

Nanoparticles May Be the New Future for Cancer Immunotherapy

Gaurav Sharma ’22 Cancer immunotherapy has been extensively explored and requires information of the tumor’s antigen presentation in order for a method to be selected. An approach that is more effective and has a broader range had not been found that did not have the constraint of needing the information of the tumor’s antigen presentation. Researchers at Johns Hopkins School of Medicine and Johns Hopkins … Continue reading Nanoparticles May Be the New Future for Cancer Immunotherapy

Anchor-Cell Invasion Regulation Network Discovered

Gaurav Sharma ’22 Invasion through the basement membrane is essential to many cellular and biological processes such as embryonic development, immune response, tissue development, and metastasis. The components and mechanism of basement membrane invasion is known. There are four transcription factors that regulate anchor-cell invasion; fos-1, hlh-2, nhr-67, and egl-43. The Matus Lab at Stony Brook University sought to answer the question of how all … Continue reading Anchor-Cell Invasion Regulation Network Discovered

Inactivated Gene Linked to Kidney Cancer and Tumor Development in Mice

Gaurav Sharma ’22 The epigenetic components pertaining to the onset of cancer have been of interest for many years due to the hope of developing approaches to delay the onset of cancer in the future for an individual. Recently, a tumor suppressor family has been discovered, called Ras-Association Domain Family (RASSF) which epigenetically inactivated breast, lung, skin, and thyroid cancers. Neither RASSF10’s in-vivo function nor … Continue reading Inactivated Gene Linked to Kidney Cancer and Tumor Development in Mice