The Unlikely Relation Between Gut and Brain

By Allan Mai ‘20 With the high selectivity of the blood-brain barrier, it appears unlikely that microorganisms in the stomach could ever be able to reach the brain. However, past studies that have suggested major correlation between depression and specific gut bacteria and even correlation between social behavior and the activities of certain gut bacteria have sparked intense research regarding the “gut-brain” axis. Among these … Continue reading The Unlikely Relation Between Gut and Brain

Clinical study confirms another benefit of eating crickets

By Nita Wong ‘21 While crickets are not a staple in the average American diet, more than 2 billion people around the world regularly consume insects, which are known to be rich in protein, vitamins, minerals, and healthy fats. A recent study conducted at the University of Wisconsin-Madison Nelson Institute for Environmental Studies and published in the journal Scientific Reports is adding the increased growth … Continue reading Clinical study confirms another benefit of eating crickets

Harmful Effects Found in a Common Household Additive

By Anna Tarasova‘19 Triclosan (TCS) is an antimicrobial chemical frequently used in household products, including toothpastes, soaps, and toys. Because it is so common, the overwhelming majority of the population comes into contact with it almost every day. The National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey found TCS in approximately 75% of urine samples of individuals tested in the United States. TCS is also among the … Continue reading Harmful Effects Found in a Common Household Additive