History of Maternal Depression May Correlate with Hippocampal Volume in their Children

Yukta Kulkarni ’22 Depression is defined as a mental disorder in which a person has consistent feelings of sadness and a severe loss of interest. Affecting all age groups, parents can be inflicted with depression or depression-like symptoms. Previous studies have found that children of parents suffering from depression have an increased risk of developing psychiatric disorders during their lifetimes. However, the process of how … Continue reading History of Maternal Depression May Correlate with Hippocampal Volume in their Children

Improving Cognitive Functions in World Trade Center Responders

Thumyat Noe ’23 Individuals who responded to the World Trade Center attacks on September 11th, 2001 experienced a great deal of trauma and distress. Researchers from Stony Brook University who study well-being and cognitive abilities discovered that these responders are at an elevated relative risk of developing aging-related cognitive impairment. In particular, lower cognitive function is correlated with higher levels of exposure to trauma in … Continue reading Improving Cognitive Functions in World Trade Center Responders

The Effects of Short Term Estrogen Therapy on Long Term Cognition in Mouse Model

Stephanie Budhan ‘20 Menopause in women is characterized by the decline in the production of reproductive hormones such as estrogen. Estrogen plays in a major role in maintaining cognition. Thus, post-menopausal estrogen therapy has the potential to enhance cognition in women. However, treatment success, and it appears that estrogen therapy is only effective at a critical time or age in women. Previously, researchers at Tulane … Continue reading The Effects of Short Term Estrogen Therapy on Long Term Cognition in Mouse Model

Figure 1. A German study recently revealed that video gamers may have an advantage in learning that non video gamers do not have.

Do Video Gamers Have an Edge in Learning?

By Meenu Johnkutty ’21 Learning is an everyday occurrence that extends beyond the traditional classroom setting, whether it be quickly memorizing a bus route or remembering a colleague’s number. A recent study led by Dr. Sabrina Schenk of Ruhr University in Bochum, Germany, revealed that video gamers may have an edge in learning over non video gamers. In this study, researchers explored categorization learning, defined … Continue reading Do Video Gamers Have an Edge in Learning?