Bacteriophages as Therapeutic Targets in the Alleviation of Alcoholic Liver Disease Symptoms

Simran Kaur ‘20 The acute form of alcohol-induced liver disease, alcoholic hepatitis, has a high mortality rate, and therapy is insufficiently effective. It is known to be promoted by gut microbiota. Cytolysin, a cell-destroying substance secreted by Enterococcus faecalis, is a major cause of hepatocyte apoptosis, consequent liver injury, and progression of hepatic disease. Patients diagnosed with alcohol-dependence present with significantly higher concentrations of E. … Continue reading Bacteriophages as Therapeutic Targets in the Alleviation of Alcoholic Liver Disease Symptoms

New Targeted Therapy May Prevent and Reverse Food Allergies

Nicole Zhao ’20 A food allergy is an immune system reaction that occurs when exposed to a certain food (1). Symptoms resulting from an allergic reaction include digestive problems, hives, swollen airways and even anaphylaxis (1). Anaphylaxis is a serious, life-threatening allergic reaction and encompasses a variety of symptoms with high severity (2). During an allergic reaction, the immune system recognizes that a specific food … Continue reading New Targeted Therapy May Prevent and Reverse Food Allergies

Hormone Producing Microbes Protects from Plant Pathogens

By Meghan Bialt-DeCelie ’19 Using microbes is one of the more unique ways of protecting plants from abiotic and biotic stresses of the environment. Researchers from the University of Copenhagen discovered a novel method for bacteria to produce a plant hormone called cytokinin that can biocontrol plants. Cytokinin is responsible for a wide range of functions including cell division, nutrient mobilization, and seed germination. There are … Continue reading Hormone Producing Microbes Protects from Plant Pathogens