Lymphatic Vessels Can Improve Cognition Relative to Age

Caleb Sooknanan ‘20 Aging is often associated with increased neurological problems among humans, and more research is needed to understand how lymphatic vessels connecting the brain and the immune system affect conditions such as Alzheimer’s disease. Doctor Jonathan Kipnis and researchers from the University of Virginia enhanced the lymphatic vessels of aging mice and significantly improved their abilities to learn and retain memory. The researchers … Continue reading Lymphatic Vessels Can Improve Cognition Relative to Age

Treadmill Exercise Changes the Landscape of a Diseased Brain

By Matthew Lee ‘21 Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and other neurodegenerative diseases have debilitating effects on the elderly. AD is characterized by the buildup of proteins, subtype amyloid beta (Aβ), which form plaques and can contribute to Tau build up. However, there are multiple means by which to reduce the likelihood of developing AD. Several studies have confirmed the beneficial effects of exercise on mice with … Continue reading Treadmill Exercise Changes the Landscape of a Diseased Brain

Figure 1. Researchers from University of California Los Angeles found that microstimulation of the right entorhinal region of the brain improved memory specificity of epileptic subjects.

Electrical Stimulation Improves Memory in Epileptic Patients

By Meghan Bialt-DeCelie ‘19 For many animals and humans, a major region of the brain involved in memory formation is the hippocampus. Learning and memory is done through a neural process called long-term potentiation (LTP), and past research has shown that electric stimulation to the hippocampus can promote this process. Researchers led by Ali Titiz, PhD from The University of California Los Angeles found a … Continue reading Electrical Stimulation Improves Memory in Epileptic Patients