Tegu Lizard Displays Seasonal Endothermy

By Shannon Bohman ’19 Most mammals are endothermic, meaning they generate their own body heat. Some creatures, called ectotherms, are unable to self-sustain a body temperature above the surrounding temperature. However, researchers at the University of Alberta in Canada and the University of Melbourne in Australia have found a particular ectotherm, the tegu lizard, that often displays endothermic characteristics. During their reproductive season, tegu lizards … Continue reading Tegu Lizard Displays Seasonal Endothermy

Positive Body Image Campaign Causes Decline in Women’s Health

By Lee Ann Santore ’19 Many researchers suggest that it is in the best interest for consumers to ignore the “body size issue” for the sake of their physical and mental health. An experiment conducted by Lily Lin, of California State University, and Brent McFerran, of Simon Fraser University, investigated how strongly advertisements can influence a woman’s health choices. Women participating in the study were … Continue reading Positive Body Image Campaign Causes Decline in Women’s Health

The Brain Circuit that Wakes You Up

By Karis Tutuska ’18 A goodnight’s sleep is crucial not only for cognitive function, but for long-term physical health as well, which is why so much effort has gone into studying the mechanisms of sleep. While scientists have long known the key brain circuits that control NREM sleep (non rapid eye movement, associated with light sleep) and REM sleep (rapid eye movement, associated with deep sleep … Continue reading The Brain Circuit that Wakes You Up

New Study Suggests Loneliness Destroys Physical Health

By Karis Tutuska ’18   It is widely accepted that loneliness can damage mental health. However, a recent study supported by the National Institutes of Health suggested that isolation affects physical health as well.  Researchers studied 141 adults aged 50-68 and found that the feeling of loneliness a phenomenon known as “conserved transcriptional response to adversity”(CTRA). CTRA has two major physiological consequences: it inhibits genetic expression … Continue reading New Study Suggests Loneliness Destroys Physical Health

Scientists Use Computer Modeling to Determine if Information is Contagious

By Lee Ann Santore Stony Brook University’s own researchers, Christian Luhmann and Suparna Rajaram, have conducted a study that will make students think twice about studying with a group. The study aimed to determine whether or not information is contagious in the same way that behaviors like smoking are. Their experiment involved the use of advanced computer modeling to simulate individuals and groups of humans. … Continue reading Scientists Use Computer Modeling to Determine if Information is Contagious

Study Suggests Children with Religious Upbringing are Less Altruistic

By Karis Tutuska Image Acquired from: https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/a/a5/Children_marbles.jpg Figure Caption: Study tests altruism in children with religious and non-religious upbringings Many assume that religion plays a crucial role in a child’s moral development. However, a recent study at the University of Chicago suggests that children raised with a religious background are less altruistic than those who are were raised secularly. The experiment was conducted on children aged … Continue reading Study Suggests Children with Religious Upbringing are Less Altruistic

Light Therapy vs Cognitive Behavioral Therapy

By Meghan Bialt-DeCelie Image Acquired from: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Light_therapy Figure 2: An example of a light source commonly used in light therapy to treat Seasonal Affective Disorder.   With shorter days and winter approaching, over 14 million Americans experience Seasonal Affective Disorder (SAD) or the “winter blues”. Commonly used, light therapy tackles the biological causes of SAD by exposing one to an artificial light for a period of … Continue reading Light Therapy vs Cognitive Behavioral Therapy

Sleeping on the Right Side of the Bed

By Meghan Bialt-DeCelie Image Acquired from: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sleep_and_weight Figure 1: The lateral sleeping position, found to be the best position for the efficiency of the glymphatic pathway. According to a recent study led by Hedok Lee, PhD and Helene Beneveniste, MD, PhD of Stony Brook University, the position you sleep in affects your body’s efficiency to remove metabolic wastes from the brain in a process called Glymphatic … Continue reading Sleeping on the Right Side of the Bed

New Study Helps Define “Stupidity”

By Lee Ann Santore The word stupid is used daily to describe a wide variety of actions. However, it is unclear of what constitutes something as stupid. A team of psychologists led by Balazs Aczel, from the Institute of Psychology at Eotvos Lorand University, completed a study to obtain a better understanding of the behavior patterns humans regard as “stupid.” Aczel’s team compiled a collection … Continue reading New Study Helps Define “Stupidity”

Sleep duration is related to poor diet in teens

By Katherine Maiorisi A study conducted by Dr. Hale at Stony Brook University has developed data that shows a direct link between sleep deprivation and obesity in teens. This study, which was supported by the “National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney diseases”, was done on a sample of 13,284 teenagers [1]. Dr. Hale specified that this study group of teens were asked questions … Continue reading Sleep duration is related to poor diet in teens