Tegu Lizard Displays Seasonal Endothermy

By Shannon Bohman ’19 Most mammals are endothermic, meaning they generate their own body heat. Some creatures, called ectotherms, are unable to self-sustain a body temperature above the surrounding temperature. However, researchers at the University of Alberta in Canada and the University of Melbourne in Australia have found a particular ectotherm, the tegu lizard, that often displays endothermic characteristics. During their reproductive season, tegu lizards … Continue reading Tegu Lizard Displays Seasonal Endothermy

Possible Ninth Planet in the Outer Solar System

By Shannon Bohman ’19 Planetary scientists, Konstantin Batygin and Mike Brown, of the California Institute of Technology, claim to have solid evidence of a new, ninth planet in our solar system. This planet, like other objects in space, is too far to be observed directly. Instead, its existence has been inferred. Six predetermined bodies on the outskirts of our solar system that are roughly the … Continue reading Possible Ninth Planet in the Outer Solar System

2015 Named Hottest Year on Record

By Shannon Bohman ’19 The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Association reported that 2015 has replaced 2014 as the hottest year on historical record. An unusually large El Niño pattern in the Pacific Ocean contributed to these record temperatures. However, most of this can be explained by global warming created due to the emission of greenhouse gases. As the atmosphere warms, it holds more water vapor. … Continue reading 2015 Named Hottest Year on Record

Positive Body Image Campaign Causes Decline in Women’s Health

By Lee Ann Santore ’19 Many researchers suggest that it is in the best interest for consumers to ignore the “body size issue” for the sake of their physical and mental health. An experiment conducted by Lily Lin, of California State University, and Brent McFerran, of Simon Fraser University, investigated how strongly advertisements can influence a woman’s health choices. Women participating in the study were … Continue reading Positive Body Image Campaign Causes Decline in Women’s Health

Application of Psychology in Emails Could Lead to More Effective Communication

By Lee Ann Santore ’19 In this age of technology, email is employed as a fundamental form of communication capable of creating and strengthening both casual and professional relationships. Researchers from the USC Viterbi School of Engineering, having studied 16 billion emails sent by 2 million users, were able to identify several key patterns. The results revealed that most emails are responded to within an hour, … Continue reading Application of Psychology in Emails Could Lead to More Effective Communication

New Benefits to Lowering Normal Blood Pressure

By Lee Ann Santore ’19 Heart disease is often caused by extended periods of high blood pressure, but its occurrence is not restricted to those individuals with high blood pressure. Traditionally, high blood pressure medications have only been prescribed to patients with systolic blood pressures above the threshold level of 140 mmHg as issued by England’s National Institute for Health and Care Excellence.  However, a … Continue reading New Benefits to Lowering Normal Blood Pressure

Computers Can Learn Like Humans

By Cerise Carey ’16 Scientists have created an algorithm that allows computers to recognize and draw simple visual concepts, such as handwritten characters. A research group under the guidance of Dr. Brenden Lake, a Moore-Sloan Data Science Fellow at New York University, devised an algorithm that serves to shorten the time it takes for computers to “learn” new concepts and replicate types of pattern recognition … Continue reading Computers Can Learn Like Humans

The Brain Circuit that Wakes You Up

By Karis Tutuska ’18 A goodnight’s sleep is crucial not only for cognitive function, but for long-term physical health as well, which is why so much effort has gone into studying the mechanisms of sleep. While scientists have long known the key brain circuits that control NREM sleep (non rapid eye movement, associated with light sleep) and REM sleep (rapid eye movement, associated with deep sleep … Continue reading The Brain Circuit that Wakes You Up

New Strain of Infectious Cancer Found in Sarcophilus Harrisii

By Karis Tutuska ’18 Cancer is a scary word, but what is even more frightening is the concept of a contagious cancer. Sarcophilus harrisii, commonly known as Tasmanian devils, are large carnivorous marsupials, savage screechers, and voracious eaters. These organisms are plagued by deadly, fast-acting facial tumors that grow until they prevent the animal from eating and force starvation until death. What is unusual about these … Continue reading New Strain of Infectious Cancer Found in Sarcophilus Harrisii

New Study Suggests Loneliness Destroys Physical Health

By Karis Tutuska ’18   It is widely accepted that loneliness can damage mental health. However, a recent study supported by the National Institutes of Health suggested that isolation affects physical health as well.  Researchers studied 141 adults aged 50-68 and found that the feeling of loneliness a phenomenon known as “conserved transcriptional response to adversity”(CTRA). CTRA has two major physiological consequences: it inhibits genetic expression … Continue reading New Study Suggests Loneliness Destroys Physical Health

Determining the Sex of a Fingerprint

By Shannon Bohman ’19 An new innovative test may help determine whether a fingerprint comes from a man or a woman. Certain amino acids are twice as prevalent in women than in men, meaning that testing for amino acid concentration found in fingerprints can determine the gender of the person they belong to. For more than a century, fingerprints have been analyzed as if they … Continue reading Determining the Sex of a Fingerprint

Microbiome Technology Developed at Stony Brook

By Shannon Bohman ’19 Stony Brook University recently incorporated breakthrough microbiome technology into nutrient based compositions. The university incorporated these compositions into two patent applications filed to Ortek Therapeutics, Inc. Ortek had been seeking partners to develop and commercialize these compositions into over-the-counter and commercialized products. These nutrient based products, in particular, will efficiently prevent body odor and staph infections. Stony Brook’s Dr. Israel Kleinberg, … Continue reading Microbiome Technology Developed at Stony Brook