The Power of Painting: Art Therapy for Holocaust Survivors

Peter Gillespie ’25 Trauma during the formative stages of childhood can lead to permanent alterations to the neuroendocrine system, largely impacting one’s responses to stress. Previous brain scans have shown that reflection upon trauma triggers immense emotional activity but little speech-related activity; thus, traumatized individuals may have strong feelings yet are unable to verbalize their emotions. A team led by Roni Israeli at the University … Continue reading The Power of Painting: Art Therapy for Holocaust Survivors

The Influence of Color in Artwork on Personal Preference

Joyce Chen ’23 While one’s artistic tastes are subjective, there is a universal preference for certain colors in artwork. This was observed in recent studies that assessed participants’ color preferences by changing the color spectrum of several unfamiliar paintings. Overall, the participants preferred the color compositions most similar to the original paintings, though the reasons for these preferences remain unknown. Dr. Shigeki Nakauchi of the … Continue reading The Influence of Color in Artwork on Personal Preference

Feeling the Rainbow: Advances in Multisensory Artistic Experiences for the Visually Impaired

Peter Gillespie ’25 Is art seen, or is it experienced? Thanks to the work of researchers Jorge Bartolome, Gilsang Cho, and Jun-Dong Cho at Sungkyunkwan University, people with visual impairments can now appreciate artwork through senses other than vision. Previous research in allowing people with visual impairments to experience art has appealed to just one other sense, such as sound or touch. However, Bartolome and … Continue reading Feeling the Rainbow: Advances in Multisensory Artistic Experiences for the Visually Impaired

Musical Cues: How Tunes May Yield Greater Positive Memories Than Words or Sounds

Sooraj Shah ’24 When one hears a favorite piece of music or sees an old photograph, he or she is reminded of the time and place when the song or event was first heard or experienced. This recognition allows an individual to relive the moment, regardless of the level of  joyousness of the occasion. The extent to which that song or photograph evokes a memory … Continue reading Musical Cues: How Tunes May Yield Greater Positive Memories Than Words or Sounds

Can A Virtual Reality Stimulation With a Criminal’s Future Self Decrease Self-Destructive Behavior?

Joyce Chen ’23 Many of us have done things that we regret over the course of our lifetime. Some of us develop from our setbacks, while others are imprisoned and ostracized by society. These criminals’ actions were likely impulsive, completely disregarding the consequences that the future may bring. However, poor decisions can be resolved by introspection. Dr. Jean-Louis van Gelder of the Max Planck Institute … Continue reading Can A Virtual Reality Stimulation With a Criminal’s Future Self Decrease Self-Destructive Behavior?

Art and Medicine: The Effects of Technical Drawing Exercises on Spatial Visualization of Humans

Thumyat Noe ’23 Spatial visualization, the ability to visualize shapes and the orientations of objects in space, can help medical students learn human anatomy, which many consider a challenging area of study. Past studies suggest that high spatial visualization positively correlates with increased success in scientific disciplines, leading researchers from Kansas City University to believe that enhancing spatial visualization through technical drawing exercises may help … Continue reading Art and Medicine: The Effects of Technical Drawing Exercises on Spatial Visualization of Humans