Wearable Patch Increases Tolerance of Peanut Allergens

by Patrick Yang ’20   Consuming a tiny sample of peanuts can induce life-threatening anaphylaxis in a person with peanut allergies. Peanuts are the most prevalent allergens, accounting for approximately 16 percent of the allergies that Americans suffer from. Incidence rates are only rising, according to the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma, & Immunology. Although some children are able to outgrow their allergy, a decisive cure … Continue reading Wearable Patch Increases Tolerance of Peanut Allergens

Brain Connectivity Can Predict Occurrence of Placebo Effect

by Patrick Yang ’20   The placebo effect has consistently stumped the scientific community because it provides an effective treatment based on a patient’s belief, rather than a scientific reason. Instead of disregarding the placebo effect, Dr. Pascal Tétreault of Northwestern University and his team aimed to discover the biological context and the predictability of placebo response in chronic pain patients. Since some patients exhibit the … Continue reading Brain Connectivity Can Predict Occurrence of Placebo Effect

Phantom Limb Pain Caused by Sensorimotor Cortex Plasticity

by Patrick Yang ’20   Amputation or severe neural damage can trigger phantom limb pain, chronic pain felt in a limb that is no longer present. Phantom pain, which is associated with a burning or hypersensitive sensation, has a wide range of duration – it can be as short as a few minutes or as long as a couple days. According to popular theory, maladaptive plasticity … Continue reading Phantom Limb Pain Caused by Sensorimotor Cortex Plasticity

Caffeine May Protect Against Cognitive Impairments and Dementia

by Patrick Yang   The United States has the highest caffeine consumption in the world. In the U.S. alone, 54% of adults consume caffeine every day. Although caffeine does a fine job in keeping consumers alert, caffeine’s curative powers may go beyond just remedying morning grumpiness. According to animal studies, there is an inverse correlation between caffeine consumption and cognitive impairment and dementia. Although literature … Continue reading Caffeine May Protect Against Cognitive Impairments and Dementia

Scientists Discover Postnatal Migratory Neurons

by Patrick Yang   The cerebral cortex is the outermost layer of the brain and is responsible for advanced processes, such as complex emotion, that distinguish humans from other animals. A key component in cortex development is prenatal neural migration, the movement of neurons before birth, which begins early on in the embryo. These migratory neurons, or Arc neurons, originate near areas of initial development … Continue reading Scientists Discover Postnatal Migratory Neurons

Hormonal Birth Control May Lead to Depression

by Patrick Yang   Approximately 62% of women aged 14-44 in the U.S. are using a method of contraception, and 27% of those women are using hormonal contraception, according to a National Health Statistics report. The key to hormonal contraception’s mass appeal lies in its convenience and reversibility; it can be found in pill or patch form and does not have permanent effects. However, the estrogen … Continue reading Hormonal Birth Control May Lead to Depression

Language Stimulation Correlated with Childhood Depression

by Patrick Yang   According to the Federal Center for Mental Health Services, depression affects one in thirty-three children and one in eight adolescents aged 12-18. As of 2014, approximately 2.8 million adolescents aged 12 to 17 experienced at least one major depressive episode. This childhood depression is often correlated with social, emotional, and academic impediments that can transition into adulthood.  Although early intervention is … Continue reading Language Stimulation Correlated with Childhood Depression

Mitigation in Sea Level Rise Due to Increased Snowfall

by Patrick Yang Many global climate models project that anthropogenic global warming will lead to increased snowfall in Antarctica due to increased moisture in the atmosphere. However, the actual trend in Antarctica shows a discrepancy. Surface mass balance (SMB), the difference between the amount of snow accumulated and sublimated, has not shown any significant increase, despite the rise in global temperature. This discrepancy may be … Continue reading Mitigation in Sea Level Rise Due to Increased Snowfall