Reprogramming Cells May Reverse the Aging Process

Sooraj Shah ’24 Aging is a natural process by which cells are progressively unable to divide as efficiently as before, causing cell death and lysis as the functions of the cell slowly begin to decline. The main contributor to this are the telomeres at the end of our chromosomes. Telomeres get shorter as cells divide because replication cannot copy the “lagging end” of the chromosome. … Continue reading Reprogramming Cells May Reverse the Aging Process

Newly Discovered Functions of MAIT Cells Suggests a Possible Target for Immunotherapy and Vaccine Treatments

Sooraj Shah ’24 While much focus has been given to the COVID-19 pandemic, autoimmune diseases, such as lupus, also affect seven percent of the American population. Recent research suggests a potential link between mucosal-associated invariant T (MAIT) cells and the two diseases, as both COVID-19 and autoimmune diseases trigger increased MAIT cell response. A study led by Dr. Charles Vorkas, a professor in the Department … Continue reading Newly Discovered Functions of MAIT Cells Suggests a Possible Target for Immunotherapy and Vaccine Treatments

Repairing Damaged Vocal Cords

Aditi Kaveti ’23 Human vocal cords are structures in the larynx, just above the trachea, that vibrate to create a buzzing tone that becomes what we know as the human voice. This vibration works through resonance, which is the shaping and amplification of sound waves. In patients with laryngeal cancer, vocal cords are at risk due to the mass forming on the glottis. Signs of … Continue reading Repairing Damaged Vocal Cords

Release of Biological Molecules May Promote Formation of Vasculature in a Developing Embryo

Joyce Chen ’23 When an embryo develops, its cells undergo numerous rounds of cell division and arrange into a highly organized system of tissues that collectively assemble into organs. While positioning themselves at the midline, cells known as angioblasts are responsible for the formation of blood vessels in major arteries and veins. Simultaneously, somites — structures in the developing embryo that give rise to bone, … Continue reading Release of Biological Molecules May Promote Formation of Vasculature in a Developing Embryo

Activating the Enzyme of Youth

Ashley Goland ’23 The cause of aging has long been one of mankind’s favorite mysteries to entertain, and as science advances, its secrets are gradually being stripped away. Studying chromosome structure revealed sections called telomeres, sequences of repeated nucleotides on the ends of a chromosome that serve to prevent its deterioration, and from this discovery came a revelation about age. Aging-related diseases such as dementia, … Continue reading Activating the Enzyme of Youth

The Future of 3D Printing in Biotechnology

Aditi Kaveti ‘23 Health technology has advanced tremendously, especially in the field of tissue engineering. Two main products that have resulted from tissue engineering are scaffolds and hydrogels, both being distinct physical forms of polymers for tissue engineered skin. To  enhance cell interaction with polymers, cells need to be present as integrated parts of the bioengineered tissue or host cells need to be recruited for … Continue reading The Future of 3D Printing in Biotechnology

Synthetic Bioluminescence Allows Scientists to See Deep Tissues Using Cameras

By Marcia-Ruth Ndege ‘21 In this study, bioluminescence, the ability of a living organism to produce light, is made possible by luciferase: an enzyme derived from fireflies. The process by which luciferase catalyzes a substrate known as D-luciferin. This process generates a green-yellow glow. Atsushi Miyawaki of the RIKEN Brain Science Institute in Tokyo, in collaboration with members from the University of Electro-Communications, the Tokyo … Continue reading Synthetic Bioluminescence Allows Scientists to See Deep Tissues Using Cameras