Comfort Eating and Cortisol Reactivity

Ayesha Azeem ‘23 “Comfort-eating,” or increased food intake, is one of the most common responses to stressful situations. Cortisol is the body’s main stress hormone that regulates metabolism and the immune response to stressful situations. Cortisol reactivity under stress can predict stress-related eating behavior and how it affects the body mass index (BMI). Based on one’s cortisol reactivity to a stressor, a person may be … Continue reading Comfort Eating and Cortisol Reactivity

The Role of A Recently Discovered Protein in Obesity

Ellie Teng ‘21 Progesterone receptor membrane component 2 (PGRMC2) is a signaling protein found in various parts of the body including the uterus and liver. While it is highly expressed in fat tissue, it is also found in especially high levels in brown fat and is required for thermogenesis, the conversion of food into body heat. Researchers at the Scripps Research Institute took this knowledge … Continue reading The Role of A Recently Discovered Protein in Obesity

The Effect of Follistatin on the Browning of Fatty Tissue in Obese Mice

Kavindra Sahabir ‘21 A major myth in health and fitness circles is that all fat and fatty tissue is “bad” and contributes to obesity. While it is true that fatty tissues such as white adipose tissue play a major role in the development of obesity, diabetes, and related diseases, brown adipose tissue, another type of fatty tissue, can actually stimulate a decrease in body weight … Continue reading The Effect of Follistatin on the Browning of Fatty Tissue in Obese Mice

Consumption of Artificially Sweetened Beverages Linked to Lower Risk of Colon Cancer

Nita Wong ‘21 While the consumption of low- and no-calorie soft drinks has long been associated with a number of diseases including obesity and diabetes, such purported health risks have yet to be scientifically or clinically documented. In fact, a recent study conducted at Yale University’s Cancer Center has shown that such artificially sweetened products actually help colon cancer survivors avoid cancer recurrence and death. … Continue reading Consumption of Artificially Sweetened Beverages Linked to Lower Risk of Colon Cancer

Time-restricted eating shows weight loss potential

Nita Wong ’21 As obesity rates in the United States continue to increase, research regarding various types of diets has likewise intensified. The latest study, conducted by scientists from the University of Illinois at Chicago and published in the journal Nutrition and Healthy Aging, points to daily fasting as an effective means by which to reduce weight and lower blood pressure. Time-restricted eating confines an … Continue reading Time-restricted eating shows weight loss potential

A Possible Link Between Childhood Obesity and Intellectual Disorders

by Julia Newman (’19) According to a study recently published in the Disability and Health Journal, children with an intellectual disability (ID) are nearly twice as likely to develop obesity as those without ID. The researchers recorded weekly behaviors of children aged ten to seventeen years old, such as the frequency of family meals and exercise. The results displayed that children with ID ate consistent … Continue reading A Possible Link Between Childhood Obesity and Intellectual Disorders