Figure 1. Mammalian brains can be influenced by non-genetic and Allele-Specific expression

Mammalian Brain Affected by Non-Genetic and Allele-Specific Expression

By Rideeta Raquib ’19 The brain is a complex organ that is constantly being impacted by genetic and epigenetic factors. Mental illness patients are usually heterozygous in terms of inheriting one mutant allele. The random inactivation of the X-chromosome and genomic imprinting influences brain architecture and risk of disease. Studies on neuropsychiatric disorders uncovered a spectrum of data regarding the epigenetic dynamics of such dysfunction. … Continue reading Mammalian Brain Affected by Non-Genetic and Allele-Specific Expression

Figure 1. Liraglutide 3·0 mg may reduce the risks of type 2 Diabetes.

Reduction of Type 2 Diabetes Via Weight Loss Drug

By Rideeta Raquib ’19 Prediabetes, also known as “borderline diabetes,” is a condition common among people with obesity who have increased blood sugar levels. Although it can eventually lead to type 2 diabetes, prediabetes can be cured through exercise and diet changes. In 2012, 86 million Americans of age 20 years or older had prediabetes. A drug, named Liraglutide 3·0 mg, can reduce body weight … Continue reading Reduction of Type 2 Diabetes Via Weight Loss Drug

Using Positive Image Training to Regain Happiness

By Rideeta Raquib ’19 Emotion-related imagery training is a powerful tool for psychotherapy. Mental imagery can stimulate behavioral and physiological systems more effectively than verbal or informative stimulations. Imagery is less effective on patients diagnosed with generalized anxiety (GAD) because of the tendency to associate bright images with negative occurrences rather than generating positive images. Dr. Svetla Velikova and her team of researchers conducted a … Continue reading Using Positive Image Training to Regain Happiness

Medicinal Properties Discovered in Certain Toad Species

By Rideeta Raquib ’19 Traditional medicinal compounds utilized to treat various diseases, ranging from stomach disorders to some types of cancers, are common in toads, specifically the Bufonidae family.  Scientists at the University of Panama, Panama’s government research center INDICASAT AIP, Vanderbilt University in Tennessee, and Acharya Nagarjuna University in Guntur, India, came together to identify several chemical components of the traditional medicines acquired from … Continue reading Medicinal Properties Discovered in Certain Toad Species

Fat Metabolism Activated by Brain Hormone

By Rideeta Raquib ’19 The central nervous system is essential in regulating different parts of the body. Serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT), a neuromodulator, has been related to feeding and metabolizing, as well as burning fat. Biologists at the Scripps Research Institute set out to identify a neuropeptide ligand and its cognate receptor that makes up the 5-HT neuroendocrine axis. The study was conducted on a roundworm … Continue reading Fat Metabolism Activated by Brain Hormone

Hearing Restoration Via Gene Delivery

By Rideeta Raquib ’19 Inner ear disease disrupts a key sense of hearing for many people worldwide. However, gene therapy can treat inner ear disease if reagents are introduced into appropriate cells. A group of researchers from Harvard Medical School and the Massachusetts Hospital managed to effectively restore hearing in mice by utilizing gene therapy. The inefficacy of vectors transferred into hair cells is a … Continue reading Hearing Restoration Via Gene Delivery

Tackling Zika with an Antibody Present in Humans

by Rideeta Raquib ’19   The Zika virus, or ZIKV, falls under the classification of the flavivirus genus, which includes Dengue and West Nile virus members, and can lead to numerous negative side effects. The virus contains a surface that is composed of 180 copies of E protein organized in an icosahedral symmetrical pattern with 60 asymmetric units. It also contains three domains, DI, DII, and … Continue reading Tackling Zika with an Antibody Present in Humans

Creating a Living Bio-Hybrid System

by Rideeta Raquib ’19   Neurons are a remarkable aspect of living organisms that enable electrical signals to travel to the brain and back, this translates to voluntary and involuntary responses. Designing a functional system that could mimic the actions present in the brain has proved to be an obstacle for many researchers. The most tedious aspect of such a design is to model the learning … Continue reading Creating a Living Bio-Hybrid System

Erasing Fear via Reconditioning of the Brain

by Rideeta Raquib ’19 Fear is an unpleasant emotion that can cause someone to be afraid. Although a small amount of fear has been evolutionarily helpful to organisms for preventing predation, too much fear can be mentally harmful. In fact, phobias and post-traumatic stress disorders can negatively impact the daily lives of many people. A study conducted by neuroscientists from the University of Cambridge, Japan, and … Continue reading Erasing Fear via Reconditioning of the Brain

Toxic Hazards from Smartphones

by Rideeta Raquib ’19   Smartphones are an integral part of today’s society, but they are also a huge fire hazard. Lithium-ion batteries, commonly used in rechargeable devices, have a reputation of being susceptible to combustion. Dr. Jie Sun from the Institute of NBC Defense and the Tsinghua University in China collaborated to study the deleterious emissions of Li-ion batteries or LIBs. Two types of LIBs … Continue reading Toxic Hazards from Smartphones

Gold Nanoparticles Suppressing Tumor Growth in Pancreatic Cancer

by Rideeta Raquib ’19   Gold is one of the most valuable resources in the world, and its value may be even greater due to its potential as a new treatment for pancreatic cancer. Previously, gold nanoparticles, AuNPs, were used to target tumor regions and aid in the transport of drugs and chemotherapy to the tumor.  A previous study showed that gold nanoparticles had the ability … Continue reading Gold Nanoparticles Suppressing Tumor Growth in Pancreatic Cancer

Frog Skin Contains Chemicals That Repel Ants

by Rideeta Raquib ’19   Several species, such as the Lutjanus bohar fish species, have the ability to camouflage themselves to avoid predators. This allows them to have a selective advantage in their respective environments compared to other species. Dr. Andre de Lima Barros, from the National Institute of the Amazonian Research in Brazil, hypothesized that Lithodytes lineatus, a species of frog prominent in the Amazon … Continue reading Frog Skin Contains Chemicals That Repel Ants