COVID-19 Pandemic-Related Stress Factors Can Influence Perinatal Outcomes in Pregnant Women

Joyce Chen ’23 The COVID-19 pandemic has caused severe physical and psychological burdens on individuals around the world. Aside from the disease itself, extended quarantine periods and the inability to socialize with others have had a tremendous impact on mental wellbeing. Among the many who were negatively affected by COVID-19, pregnant women tend to feel higher levels of anxiety and stress, thereby leading to decreased … Continue reading COVID-19 Pandemic-Related Stress Factors Can Influence Perinatal Outcomes in Pregnant Women

Music Shows Positive Effects on Patients with Persistent Somatic Symptoms

Joyce Chen ’23 Somatic symptoms are commonly experienced in everyday life as headaches, fatigue, and bloating. Typically, these symptoms are short-lived. However, individuals with somatic symptom disorder (SSD) or a depressive disorder (DEP) have lingering somatic symptoms for months and even years. In addition to these physical symptoms, individuals may suffer from anxiety and intrusive thoughts. There have been attempts to mitigate such disorders in … Continue reading Music Shows Positive Effects on Patients with Persistent Somatic Symptoms

Fall 2021 Journal is Published!

Link to Journal: https://issuu.com/younginvestigatorsreview/docs/sbyir_fall_2021_journal_final_for_issuu_2 Every semester, SBYIR publishes a science journal highlighting research and topics in STEM. This journal is a culmination of effort from our writers and three branches– editorial, layout, and cabinet. This year’s journal theme is the Science of Wellbeing.  Wellbeing is defined as the state of being healthy, happy, and comfortable. When we consider our own wellbeing, we consider what is in … Continue reading Fall 2021 Journal is Published!

Muscle Preservation and Metabolism-Associated Genes Show Activity During Diapause

Joyce Chen ’23 As time progresses, all living organisms will age, decay, and perish. However, there are certain animal species that can halt their biological clocks and no longer develop. This state is known as diapause. The African Killifish are known organisms that can undergo diapause in order to survive unfavorable conditions, such as dry periods in the environment. Many of these fish remain in … Continue reading Muscle Preservation and Metabolism-Associated Genes Show Activity During Diapause

Neural Mechanism May Explain Variability of Social Ability in Autism

Vignesh Subramanian ’24 Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is a neurodevelopmental disorder involving significant challenges with communication, behavior, and social skills. The range of conditions encompassed by the term is most often characterized by limited but intense interests, repetitive patterns of behavior, difficulty maintaining or regulating interactions with other people, and difficulty synchronizing facial expressions or motor movements with speech. It has long been believed that … Continue reading Neural Mechanism May Explain Variability of Social Ability in Autism

Freshwater Pond on Southampton Island Contains Traces of the Extinct Sadlermiut People

Joyce Chen ’23 The Sadlermiut were a past civilization that lived on Southampton Island in Nunavut, Canada. Accustomed to the harsh weather of Arctic Canada, the Sadlermiut were natural hunter-gatherers and fishermen. Recovery of past artifacts and skeletal remains suggested that the civilization occupied regions of Southampton Island ranging back to 1250 CE up until 1903, when they were wiped out by a pandemic introduced … Continue reading Freshwater Pond on Southampton Island Contains Traces of the Extinct Sadlermiut People

Release of Biological Molecules May Promote Formation of Vasculature in a Developing Embryo

Joyce Chen ’23 When an embryo develops, its cells undergo numerous rounds of cell division and arrange into a highly organized system of tissues that collectively assemble into organs. While positioning themselves at the midline, cells known as angioblasts are responsible for the formation of blood vessels in major arteries and veins. Simultaneously, somites — structures in the developing embryo that give rise to bone, … Continue reading Release of Biological Molecules May Promote Formation of Vasculature in a Developing Embryo

Immunomodulatory Therapies Improve Long-Term Visual Outcomes Amid Optic Neuritis Preceding Late-Stage MS

Vignesh Subramanian ’24 Optic neuritis (ON) is a condition involving inflammation of the optic nerve that can cause its demyelination, or the destruction of the fatty tissue known as myelin that insulates and protects nerves. Although relatively rare, ON first manifests in young adulthood and can cause diminished visual acuity or blurriness, poor pupillary constriction, ophthalmalgia (eye pain), and the inability to see out of one … Continue reading Immunomodulatory Therapies Improve Long-Term Visual Outcomes Amid Optic Neuritis Preceding Late-Stage MS

Familial Economic Well-Being In Relation to Children’s Personal Development

Ishmam Khan ’25 According to the Federal Ministry for Family Affairs, Senior Citizens, Women and Youth, almost 20% of German children are part of a single-parent household or stepfamily. Previous research has shown the relationship between the “complexity” of a child’s family– specifically, the degree of deviance from a traditional nuclear family– and a child’s mental well-being. There has also been a scientifically noted connection … Continue reading Familial Economic Well-Being In Relation to Children’s Personal Development

Financial Well-Being Involves Feeling Financially Secure in Both The Present And The Future

Yukta Kulkarni ’22 When one thinks of wellbeing, mental and physical well-being usually comes to mind. However, especially in today’s society, economic well-being is just as important. Also known as financial well-being, economic well-being is defined as the ability to meet all monetary expectations, while continuing to be financially stable. This corresponds largely with the job market, as a steady income can promote financial well-being. … Continue reading Financial Well-Being Involves Feeling Financially Secure in Both The Present And The Future

Leisure Time or Lost Time: How Negative Beliefs About Leisure Exacerbate Mental Illnesses

Ayesha Azeem ’23 Although it is enjoyable to take breaks away from work and obligations, certain factors can undermine this enjoyment, like tracked or scheduled leisure time. Leisure provides people with a sense of control in life and can reduce the risk of depression. These benefits, however, may be less impactful in people who believe that taking time out for leisure is wasteful. Rutgers University … Continue reading Leisure Time or Lost Time: How Negative Beliefs About Leisure Exacerbate Mental Illnesses

Grip Strength as an Avenue of Depression Prediction

Sooraj Shah ’24 Depression is a mental state in which individuals often feel disinterested in everyday activities, preventing them from taking advantage of life’s opportunities. Interestingly, depression seems to take a physical form as well, with muscle strength and functionality being a main area of concern. Unfortunately, muscle failures often go untreated because the majority of people with depression tend to reject treatment. In a … Continue reading Grip Strength as an Avenue of Depression Prediction