The Usage of Electromagnetic Waves as Water Sanitizers as Opposed to Traditional Methods of Water Sanitation

Kavindra Sahabir ‘21 One of the biggest challenges for animal breeding on farms is assuring the highest quality of the drinking water afforded to said animals. The goal is to prevent contamination from pathogens in order to ensure optimal animal health, and lower the risk disease. Currently, the system that most farms use is a physical method of filtration along with different chemical treatments. However, … Continue reading The Usage of Electromagnetic Waves as Water Sanitizers as Opposed to Traditional Methods of Water Sanitation

Periodontal Disease Bacteria Linked to Alzheimer’s

By Annamaria Cavaleri ‘22 Periodontal disease is a common but preventable gum infection that produces bacteria. Recent studies performed by researchers at the University of Chicago (UIC) show that long-term exposure to periodontal disease bacteria causes inflammation and degeneration of neurons in the brains of mice. This is similar to the effects that Alzheimer’s disease has on humans, a disease that currently has no treatment … Continue reading Periodontal Disease Bacteria Linked to Alzheimer’s

Elimination of Pathogens by Signaling Interference

By Allan Mai ‘20 Ever see that probiotic label on the side of a container of yogurt or another dairy product and wonder what it means? Probiotic nutrition helps reduce pathogenic colonization of the intestines; however, until recently, researchers’ knowledge of the mechanism behind this process was ambiguous. Pipat Piewngam of Mahidol University in Thailand and his colleagues have discovered that the probiotic Bacillus works … Continue reading Elimination of Pathogens by Signaling Interference

Synergistic Products May Possibly Aid Bacterial Survival

By Fatin Chowdhury ‘19 In an introductory microbiology course, students may learn about bacterial synergy. When bacteria synergistically infect a host through a biofilm, for example, different strains work in conjunction with one another, amplifying their effects. Researchers in Germany, led by Dr. Johannes Arp, recently explored the synergetic tendencies of products from a strain of Pseudomonas bacteria designated as QS1027, which in environmental samples … Continue reading Synergistic Products May Possibly Aid Bacterial Survival

The Microbiome’s Influence on Immunotherapy

By: Gene Yang ‘19 When it was discovered that cancer cells with the protein PD-L1 avoid detection by the immune system, clinical trials involving PD-L1-targeted drugs emerged. These drugs, part of a class known as immune checkpoint inhibitors, block the interaction between the cancer cells’ PD-L1 protein and the immune system’s T cells, which then allows the immune system to detect and attack the tumor. … Continue reading The Microbiome’s Influence on Immunotherapy

Figure 1. Gut microbiota changes are crucial for the healthy development of infants.

The Roles of Human Gut Inhabitants in Infant Development

By Maryna Mullerman ’20 Farzana Yasmin and researchers from the University of Alberta in Canada analyzed how microbial systems in infant guts change over time, as well as how they can be affected by perinatal factors such as antibiotics, formula feeding, and birth mode. The study would reveal the importance of tracking variations in microbial community during early life stages. The researchers collected data from … Continue reading The Roles of Human Gut Inhabitants in Infant Development

Swimming Pools May Be Mutagenic

By Sahil Rawal (’19) Swimming pools are known to contain many disinfectant products such as chlorine to keep the water safe to swim in. However, studies have recently found that these disinfectants release byproducts that could eventually react with organic matter already present in the water, such as human urine or sweat. These released byproducts have already been found to cause cases of asthma and … Continue reading Swimming Pools May Be Mutagenic

Microbiome Technology Developed at Stony Brook

By Shannon Bohman ’19 Stony Brook University recently incorporated breakthrough microbiome technology into nutrient based compositions. The university incorporated these compositions into two patent applications filed to Ortek Therapeutics, Inc. Ortek had been seeking partners to develop and commercialize these compositions into over-the-counter and commercialized products. These nutrient based products, in particular, will efficiently prevent body odor and staph infections. Stony Brook’s Dr. Israel Kleinberg, … Continue reading Microbiome Technology Developed at Stony Brook