Stress Linked to Memory Impairment and Reduced Brain Size

By Annamaria Cavaleri ‘22 Given the increased amount of stress present in modern life, cognitive aging is an issue that is attracting more attention. Recent studies conducted in the neurology department of UT Health San Antonio suggest that stress is directly related to memory impairment and reduced brain size in your middle age. Cortisol is a hormone linked to stress and this study demonstrated that … Continue reading Stress Linked to Memory Impairment and Reduced Brain Size

Sleep Deprivation and Performance

By Raymond Cheung ‘22 Sleep is a necessity that many do not get enough of on a daily basis. Sleep deprivation can significantly impair cognitive function, which can prove dangerous and costly for intensive jobs. While the adverse effects of sleep deprivation on performance are not new, a recent study by Michelle E. Stepan and researchers from Michigan State University employed a large controlled sample … Continue reading Sleep Deprivation and Performance

Lymphatic Vessels Can Improve Cognition Relative to Age

Caleb Sooknanan ‘20 Aging is often associated with increased neurological problems among humans, and more research is needed to understand how lymphatic vessels connecting the brain and the immune system affect conditions such as Alzheimer’s disease. Doctor Jonathan Kipnis and researchers from the University of Virginia enhanced the lymphatic vessels of aging mice and significantly improved their abilities to learn and retain memory. The researchers … Continue reading Lymphatic Vessels Can Improve Cognition Relative to Age

Traveling Waves in the Cortex May Hold the Key to Understanding Human Cognition

Rachel Kogan ’19 “Neurons that fire together, wire together.” This age old phrase serves as the foundation for neuroscience, commenting not only on neuron synchronicity, but also proposing a biological scaffold for behavior and thought. The greater the number of oscillating electrical impulses, or brain waves, fired by a group of neurons, the stronger the signal and potential for action. In the past few years, … Continue reading Traveling Waves in the Cortex May Hold the Key to Understanding Human Cognition

Direct Connection Between Eye Movement Patterns and Memory Established

By Marcia-Ruth Ndege ‘21 For the first time in history, researchers have established a direct connection between eye movement patterns and brain activity. Using brain imaging technology, scientists from the Baycrest Rotman Research Institute (RRI) found evidence that the brain uses eye movements to help recreate vivid moments. Dr. Bradley Buchsbaum, a scientist at RRI and a professor of psychology at the University of Toronto, … Continue reading Direct Connection Between Eye Movement Patterns and Memory Established

Exploring Saccadic Eye Movement

By Fatin Chowdhury ‘19 The nuances of eye movements form an overlooked part of human vision. Dr. Grace Edwards at Istituto Italiano di Technologia in Italy examined the effect of peripheral information near a saccade target. Saccading is the completion of rapid eye movement by healthy human eyes while being fixated on differing spatial points. Edwards hypothesized that the neural interpretation of a postsaccadic visual … Continue reading Exploring Saccadic Eye Movement

Brain Cells Live and Die in the Process of Learning

By Marcia-Ruth Ndege ’21 For over a century, researchers have pondered the question of how the brain intakes, processes, and retains new information. Researcher Elisabeth Wenger and her team at the Max Plank Institute for Human Development in Berlin, Germany probed deeper into this process by examining the volumetric changes in human grey matter and linking them to the process of skill acquisition in humans. … Continue reading Brain Cells Live and Die in the Process of Learning

Figure 1. New research suggests that the long-term effects of high intensity exercise extend to memory.

High Intensity Exercise Stimulates Memory

By Meenu Johnkutty ‘21 New research suggests that the long-term effects of high intensity exercise may prove to be more beneficial than previously thought. Many studies have demonstrated that aerobic exercise improves the structure and function of the hippocampus, the region of the brain responsible for learning and memory. Scientists posit that neurotrophic factors like insulin growth factor (IGF) and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) are … Continue reading High Intensity Exercise Stimulates Memory

A Snapshot of the Memory Mechanism

By  Karis Tutuska Image Acquired from: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Internexin#/media/File:Microglia_and_neurons.jpg  Figure Caption: Neurons predisposed to joining networks that take place in learning may provide a visual of the memory mechanism Have you ever wondered what memories look like? A group of neuroscientists at Rosalind Franklin University of Medicine and Science have captured a visual of the memory mechanism by studying the swim motor program of Tritonia, a genus … Continue reading A Snapshot of the Memory Mechanism