A New Method For Diagnosing Parkinson’s Disease

by Sahil Rawal (’19) Parkinson’s disease is a condition that causes lower levels of dopamine in the brain, leading to neurodegeneration. Parkinson’s is commonly seen in older patients, and causes a loss of muscle control. Till now, there was no test for Parkinson’s that would guarantee its diagnosis; rather, physicians analyzed medical histories and conducted neurological tests to look for signs of Parkinson’s. However, Dr. … Continue reading A New Method For Diagnosing Parkinson’s Disease

The Effect of Acetaminophen on Pregnant Women

by Sahil Rawal (’19) Acetaminophen is a painkiller that is often used by pregnant women as an analgesic, as it is readily available over-the-counter. The CDC had previously deemed this drug safe, and it was shown to cause no major birth defects. However, there have been recent studies that have shown that acetaminophen may play a role in causing autism-like symptoms in children. As a … Continue reading The Effect of Acetaminophen on Pregnant Women

The Disadvantages of Opioids as Painkillers

by Sahil Rawal (’19) Opioids are one of the most commonly used painkillers in the United States. They have been shown to bind to opioid receptors and reduce the feeling of pain. However, there have been very few, if any, studies conducted that prove the negative aspects of opioids and how they may not actually relieve pain as well as we once believed. Dr. Grace … Continue reading The Disadvantages of Opioids as Painkillers

Aloe Vera May Be Beneficial For Diabetic Patients

by Sahil Rawal (’19) Diabetes mellitus is an epidemic that leads to many deaths every year. It is caused when a person’s blood sugars are too high, and can eventually lead to organ failure and death if left untreated. Billions of dollars each year are spent trying to find potential cures for this disease, but unfortunately most are to no avail. However, recent studies have … Continue reading Aloe Vera May Be Beneficial For Diabetic Patients

A New Vaccine For Alzheimer’s Disease

by Sahil Rawal (’19) Alzheimer’s disease is a debilitating disease that most often affects people of older age. A common trait within patients with Alzheimer’s disease is the accumulation of beta-amyloid proteins. These proteins eventually form plaques in the brain, which block nerve signaling and cause cell death. Although this is widely known, there have been very few successful treatments created within the last few … Continue reading A New Vaccine For Alzheimer’s Disease

Low-Density Lipoproteins May Affect Cognitive Function

by Sahil Rawal (’19) Cholesterol is a lipid in our body that is necessary for proper functioning. However, low-density lipoproteins, also known as LDLs, are a type of harmful cholesterol that can build up and cause problems in arteries, which can lead to heart attacks or strokes. Although there is an abundance of information about the harmful effects of LDLs, there is an ambiguity of … Continue reading Low-Density Lipoproteins May Affect Cognitive Function

New Imaging System May Help Remove Tumor Tissue

by Sahil Rawal (’19) Ovarian cancer is commonly treated by surgery to remove the tumor, but often, tumor tissue is still left behind after the surery. To remove the extra tumor tissues, surgeons have to go back and manually distinguish between malignant and benign tissue. This difficulty leads to malignant tumor tissue being left in the patient for long periods of time, which is a … Continue reading New Imaging System May Help Remove Tumor Tissue

A New Treatment for Blood Clots

by Sahil Rawal (’19) Blood clots, which prevent oxygen from reaching tissues, are the primary cause of heart attacks and strokes, and consequently lead to an enormous number of deaths each year. However, quick removal of blood clots can help prevent this. Currently, enzymatic formulations are the most efficient ways to treat blood clots, but they have many side effects that could be harmful to … Continue reading A New Treatment for Blood Clots

A Step Forward in Parkinson’s Disease

by Sahil Rawal (’19) Parkinson’s Disease is a very deadly condition with unknown origins, as scientists have been unable to pinpoint an exact explanation for its occurrence. Previous studies have shown that patients with Parkinson’s lack dopamine-producing cells, which causes attenuation of motor skills. Furthermore, it has been shown that mitochondrial toxicity causes mutations in PINK1 and PARKIN genes in patients with Parkinson’s. However, these … Continue reading A Step Forward in Parkinson’s Disease

A New Drug For Kidney Disease

by Sahil Rawal (’19) Type 2 diabetes is a serious disease that has been connected with organ failures throughout the body. One example of this is kidney disease, which has been shown to develop in 35% of people with Type 2 diabetes. Current treatments for kidney disease involve glucose-controlling systems and RAAS-blocking agents, but these therapies still leave patients at a high risk for death. … Continue reading A New Drug For Kidney Disease

Chromosomal Studies Lead to Advancements for Alzheimer’s Disease

by Sahil Rawal (’19) Alzheimer’s disease is a well-known neurodegenerative disease that commonly affects people of older age. Although scientists have been able to connect different lifestyle factors with the onset of Alzheimer’s, the basic molecular mechanisms are still not completely understood. Currently, there are many ongoing studies that aim to gain more information on Alzheimer’s disease and the etiologies behind the devastating disease. Studies … Continue reading Chromosomal Studies Lead to Advancements for Alzheimer’s Disease

Swimming Pools May Be Mutagenic

By Sahil Rawal (’19) Swimming pools are known to contain many disinfectant products such as chlorine to keep the water safe to swim in. However, studies have recently found that these disinfectants release byproducts that could eventually react with organic matter already present in the water, such as human urine or sweat. These released byproducts have already been found to cause cases of asthma and … Continue reading Swimming Pools May Be Mutagenic